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Part One: BookTrib Q&A with Bestselling Author Lisa Gardner

in Thrillers by

There’s something great about reading the next book in a series – it’s like an exciting new adventure with an old friend. You know all their secrets, passions and dreams; and, even though some time has passed since you were last together, when you open that book cover it’s as though you’d never been apart. This is what bestselling author Lisa Gardner accomplishes in her Detective D.D. Warren series: she has made it her specialty to take us to places we never thought we’d go. Look For Me, sees the return of both beloved Detective D.D. Warren and Flora Dane, the victim-turned-vigilante from Find Her and takes them on a case involving the brutal deaths of an entire family, with one teenager missing. It may…

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“Survivors Guide to Prison” Director Matthew Cooke

in Non-Fiction by

Matthew Cooke, whose credits include ‘How to Make Money Selling Drugs’, ‘Confinement,’ and ‘Deliver Us From Evil,’ talks to Sean Tuohy about his latest documentary “Survivors Guide to Prison.” To learn more about Matthew Cooke, like his Facebook page or follow him on Twitter and Instagram. Also watch the trailer for “Survivors Guide to Prison.” Sign up NOW for exclusive BookTrib news, interviews and giveaways!

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Writer’s Bone: My Old Faithful Author Yang Huang

in Potpourri by

In 2013, Sean Tuohy met Daniel Ford at a Halloween party and they immediately hit it off. The Writer’s Bone podcast wasn’t born on that exact night, but they were able to discuss some of their favorite things like writing, screenwriting, books, movies, comedy, and comic books. Daniel and Sean feel that they are in the middle of something very big and wonderful and BookTrib is happy to be a partner in this endeavor.  Author Yang Huang talks to Daniel Ford about her short story collection My Old Faithful. To learn more about Yang Huang, visit her official website, like her Facebook page, or follow her on Twitter @yangwrites. Join the author for a book launch party! On April 10th at The Bindery in San Francisco, from 7:30…

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‘Shallow Graves’ Author on a Case That Haunted Her

in Thrillers by

In 2013, Sean Tuohy met Daniel Ford at a Halloween party and they immediately hit it off. The Writer’s Bone podcast wasn’t born on that exact night, but they were able to discuss some of their favorite things like writing, screenwriting, books, movies, comedy, and comic books. Daniel and Sean feel that they are in the middle of something very big and wonderful and BookTrib is happy to be a partner in this endeavor.  Maureen Boyle, author of Shallow Graves: The Hunt For The New Bedford Serial Killer, talks to Daniel Ford about writing and researching a case that has haunted her and the killer’s victims. To learn more about Maureen Boyle, visit her official website, like her Facebook page, or follow her on Twitter @MaureenEBoyle1. Want more…

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WWII Drama, the Romanov Family and a Deadly Mystery

in Pop Culture by

Dear Reader, The Silent Woman takes place during the summer of 1937. King Edward had abdicated to marry Wallis Simpson, and Adolf Hitler was building planes and conscripting an army—in violation of the Treaty of Versailles—with barely a hint of this activity being reported in the newspapers. England was headed to war, but her citizens didn’t know it. An interesting time, indeed! My hope is The Silent Woman will transport you back to this tumultuous time for Britain and for the world. I’m giving away five copies of The Silent Woman.   Write to me at [email protected] for a chance to win. Please mention Author Buzz Contest in the subject line. The Silent Woman Dear Reader, Did one of the…

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On Murder, the Gilded Age and Crime of the Century

in Non-Fiction by

It was the original crime of the century. On June 25th, 1906, a shot rang out in Madison Square Garden, leaving of one of the greatest architects and most famous of New York’s socialites dead. Stanford White, who designed New York’s Washington Square Arch, Madison Square Garden and the Rosecliff Mansion, was murdered by millionaire Harry Thaw as hundreds of people watched in horror. Years before his murder, White had fallen in love with a young actress named Evelyn Nesbit, who seemed to return his attentions. But White had two sides to him and one night, he assaulted Nesbit horribly. Despite the attack, Evelyn Nesbit remained committed to White, falling even more deeply in in love with him – even after…

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Scholastic Releases Harry Potter Collectible Covers

in Pop Culture by

BookTrib’s latest partnership is with The Mary Sue, a site with “intense passion for… fan trends, social issues, geek fashion and art, innovative gadgets, and beyond.”  This week, The Mary Sue shares with our readers the new covers celebrating the 20th anniversary of Harry Potter. Harry Potter is celebrating 20 years this September, and as part of a year-long celebration, Scholastic/Arthur A. Levine Books have released a new set of beautiful collectible covers. Illustrated by Brian Selznick, Caldecott Medal-winning illustrator and author of The Invention of Hugo Cabret, each cover of all seven books stand alone, but also connect to form a larger image. You can check out the full effect in the video above!   It’s hard to believe that Harry Potter is 20 years old! Then…

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Jon’s Picks: Spring’s Best New Thrillers with a Twist

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BookTrib columnist and bestselling author Jon Land returns with a new set of “Jon’s Picks,” the best new thrillers and suspense novels you should be reading this season. Filled with dark secrets, villainous plot twists and startling encounters with killers make this one of Jon’s best lists yet! After Anna, Lisa Scottoline (St. Martin’s Press) Lisa Scottoline never shies away from confronting her characters with hard choices and life-changing predicaments, both of which are powerfully on display in After Anna (St. Martin’s Press). Talk about your familial nightmares! Widower Noah Alderman has finally put his life back on track, thanks to a new marriage and fresh dedication to his career as a doctor.. All is well, until his new wife’s…

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Liam Callanan on Bookstores, Travel and Magic of Paris

in Fiction by

Who doesn’t love Paris? Whether it’s the language, the culture, the food, or just that element of je ne sais quoi, there’s something magnetic about the city. With so many different words that could be used, it’s telling that perhaps the most common word to describe the city is magic. And no one, it seems, understands that better than author Liam Callanan. His latest novel, Paris by the Book (Dutton), is set in city and thoroughly explores the ways that Paris not only changes you, but allows you to change within it. When Leah’s husband disappears, leaving behind only airplane tickets to Paris for her and their two daughters, Leah makes a spur of the moment decision and puts them all on the plane. There,…

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A Child’s Front-Row Seat to History and the Cold War

in Non-Fiction by

Among the array of photographs in Grace Kennan Warnecke’s new memoir is a picture of her standing with Ted Kennedy and his family in Leonid Brezhnev’s office. “The trip was highly unusual – and I knew it at the time,” recalls Warnecke. Warnecke calling something unusual? How unusual, given a life lived so close to one historical moment after another and captured in detail in her work, Daughter of the Cold War (Russian and Eastern European Studies, University of Pittsburgh Press), released today. Chatting with Warnecke reminds me of how arduous a path it has been for women. When she describes her mother at home and her father, George Kennan, as one of the most important diplomats of the 20th…

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A Child’s Front-Row Seat to History and the Cold War

in Non-Fiction by

Among the array of photographs in Grace Kennan Warnecke’s new memoir is a picture of her standing with Ted Kennedy and his family in Leonid Brezhnev’s office. “The trip was highly unusual – and I knew it at the time,” recalls Warnecke. Warnecke calling something unusual? How unusual, given a life lived so close to one historical moment after another and captured in detail in her work, Daughter of the Cold War (Russian and Eastern European Studies, University of Pittsburgh Press), released today. Chatting with Warnecke reminds me of how arduous a path it has been for women. When she describes her mother at home and her father, George Kennan, as one of the most important diplomats of the 20th…

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‘Anatomy of a Miracle:’ Too Good to Be True?

in Fiction by

After returning to Biloxi, Mississippi a veteran paraplegic from a horrific event in Afghanistan, Cameron Harris lives with his sister Tanya and spends a lot of time drinking, while managing to get around in a wheelchair. From the death of his mother, to the damaging hurricane and the war, Cameron has suffered his share. But one day while waiting for Tanya in the convenience store parking lot, he just stands up and starts to walk.  Was it a miracle, or was there a medical explanation? After a Facebook post about what had taken place goes viral, the local and national media bombard Cameron with questions related to his recovery. Christians believe this was a miracle and proof of God and…

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Orly Konig Deftly Balances the Ebb and Flow of Grief

in Fiction by

People talk a lot about the different stages of grief and how you have to go through one after another until you finally come out on the other side of it, ready to face the world again. But what happens when life stalls at one of those stages? Carousel Beach (Forge Books) by Orly Konig takes readers deep beneath the surface of that question, navigating through the murky layers of fear and guilt and, ultimately, to the hope that lies at the heart of this touching novel. The story centers on Maya Brice, a restoration artist, and the beloved carousel she is painstakingly bringing back to life one animal at a time. A year after losing her grandmother and her unborn child,…

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Amy Spalding on a Fat Character Who’s Not the “Before”

in Fiction by

BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. Readers looking for a fun and summery YA rom-com won’t want to miss The Summer of Jordi Perez (and the Best Burger in Los Angeles). The novel follows Abby Ives, a gay girl and plus-sized fashion blogger on a mission to find the best burger in LA and to score a paid position at the boutique where she interns. Along the way, she falls in love with another girl interning at the shop, photographer Jordi Perez. Here author Amy Spalding writes about her connection to Abby and the importance of fat narratives that don’t treat characters like before and after photos. Like most writers, I have a constant list of book ideas taking up space in my…

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How to Recognize Emotional Abuse: A Chat with Avery Neal

in Non-Fiction by

Emotional abuse is tough. Damaging on every level, emotional abuse, also called psychological abuse, doesn’t just take a toll on our mental state and our self-esteem, but it also impacts how we feel about ourselves and our relationships with other people. As we have seen in the media from victims who are coming forth in the wake of #MeToo, sometimes people in emotionally abusive relationships don’t actually realize that they’re in one, because the most common hallmarks we associate with abuse just aren’t there. There are no physical scars, the abuser relying on verbal and psychological attacks instead, which can be just as damaging in the long run.  Avery Neal, a psychotherapist and founder of the Women’s Therapy Clinic has…

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