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Humor

No Plot, Just Lots of Laughs & Tips on Sex and Dating

in Save The World by

When I first heard about Lost the Plot, the innovative imprint publisher of Australian firm Pantera Press that is making its foray into the United States, I thought: cute name, cuter logo, and left it at that….until tasked with the assignment of reviewing two of its titles about dating and sex. Suddenly it all made sense. Consider: Just the Tip: Sex Tips for Chicks by Gay Dudes, and #Single: Dating in the 21st Century by nobody in particular. But first things first: let’s consider Lost the Plot. “Imagination unplugged. Prepare to enter a world that straddles the lines of art, luxury, gauche and gross,” their website reads. “Lost the Plot tackles topics that affect and engage the next generation of…

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Author Steven Gaines Tickles the Funny Bone and Tells His Truth

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Steven Gaines is the bestselling author of Philistines at the Hedgerow: Passion and Property in the Hamptons, The Love You Make: An Insider’s Story of The Beatles, and many others. As a journalist Gaines has written for many publications, most notably Vanity Fair, New York Times and New York Magazine where he served as contributing editor for 12 years. A native New Yorker and graduate of NYU Film School, Gaines’s background in film is what helps him to be such a graphic storyteller to where readers are witnesses to the movie in his mind he then so eloquently puts on paper. In his memoir, One Of These Things First, Gaines looks back at childhood in 1960s Brooklyn with a humor…

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The Two Funniest, Quirkiest Humor Books Coming This Fall!

in Potpourri by

In the midst of the latest crime novels, the new rom-com books, and the just-released dramas, it can be easy to miss the small, hardback, humor books at the bookstore. Because we don’t want you to miss out, here are two of the newest, funniest, quirkiest humor books coming this fall! If My Dogs Were A Pair of Middle-Aged Men,  The Oatmeal and Matthew Inman This is a satirical comic, depicting the classic and universal behaviors of man’s best friend, but re-imagined as if your dogs were a pair of middle-aged looking men. Shedding a whole new light on the behavior of dogs, this comic comes from author Matthew Inman, best known for creating The Oatmeal, a web comic and humor website,…

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ICYMI! Our Top Picks from the 2016 Goodreads Choice Awards

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It’s once again time for the annual Goodreads Choice Awards, where thousands of readers choose their favorite books of the year. The competition is stiff this go around, with three stages of voting and tons of awesome reads to choose from. Goodreads has always been about the readers, bringing together authors and their fans in a truly personal way. The Choice Awards are no exception, and is, according to Goodreads, “the only major book award decided by readers.” Which is why this is such a great chance for the book lovers of 2016 to let their voices be heard The Opening Round vote started on November 1 and goes until the 6, so if you haven’t voted yet, now’s the time!…

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Here’s This Week’s AuthorBuzz: Free Books and So Much More!

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Author Buzz - November 2

Dear Reader, See what this week’s authors have to say! In each AuthorBuzz note you’ll receive invitations to join contests, get free books, bookplates or bookmarks, read personal stories, and more. Dear Reader, In the early 1990s Austin, Texas two young lovers move in together and open a cafe and chase the American dream, only to be besieged by their own pasts, drugs, and New Orleans mobsters. As the plot unfolds the story becomes increasingly sinister. Over the course of little more than a week the couple must find a way to protect each other and all they are struggling for or lose everything. Kirkus Review called Riverside “A steamy tale and beguiling thriller, with plenty of local color and…

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Author Adam Ehrlich Sachs Answers One Question About ‘Inherited Disorders’

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Rarely do writers compose a great piece by sitting down and just doing it. Countless hours of thought and uncertainty go into writing a poem, story or novel before typing a single word. Writers are often inspired to create something but many just don’t know where to start. Our most recent addition to the One Question and Answer series features Adam Ehrlich Sachs’ Inherited Disorders: Stories, Parables, & Problems (Regan Arts, May 3, 2016). Written in over 100 vignettes this short, short story collection spans over thousands of years exploring the often absurd dynamic between fathers and sons. So, that begs the question of how Sachs came to write so extensively on this subject. Question: What did you find so fascinating…

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Video: Interview with Ryan Aldred and Rum Luck (A Bar on a Beach Mystery)

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Sand. Monkeys. Murder. Ben Cooper was supposed to be on his Pacific honeymoon. Not waking up in a Costa Rican prison cell with no memory of the night before.Then again, Ben never thought he would catch his fiancée with some clown – literally. Or that his friend Miguel would drag him to the surf paradise of Tamarindo before Aunt Mildred could ask why they cancelled the open bar reception. But surely his friend and lawyer Victoria didn’t need to fly down from Toronto overnight. After all, the police would let him go once he sobered up and paid his fine. Right? Except for the little matter of a murder. And Ben’s buying a beachside bar from the victim, hours before…

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Just Let It Happen: The Joy of Leaving Your Sh*t All Over the Place

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If you’ve been talking to your clothes while folding them lovingly in an attempt to make your life more “tidy,” you should take a long, hard look at yourself, according to author Jennifer McCartney. Her new book, The Joy of Leaving Your Sh*t All Over the Place: The Art of Being Messy (Countryman, May 24, 2016) is the perfect guide to free yourself from the shackles of over-organization. McCartney encourages you to give in to your messier urges because being too clean is a sure sign of a dreadfully boring and uncreative personality. This book is a too-real parody of Marie Kondo’s The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, which encourages readers to throw out old belongings to help declutter their…

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Video: Missed It? Interview with Samantha Jayne and Quarter Life Poetry

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The creator of the popular Quarter Life Poetry Tumblr and Instagram tackles real-life truths of work, money, sex, and many other 20-something challenges in this laugh-out-loud collection of poetry. Samantha Jayne knows that life post-college isn’t as glamorous as all undergrads think it’s going to be… because she’s currently living it. At 25, Samantha began creating doodles and funny poems about her #struggle to share with friends on Instagram. To her surprise, these poems were picked up by 20-somethings all around the world who agreed, “This is literally us.” At a time when it seems like everyone else is getting married, snagging a dream job, and paying off their student loans, Samantha’s poetry captures the voice of young people everywhere…

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Magical Giveaways!

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Comment for a chance to win one of this week’s brand spanking new titles. This is Awkward by Sammy Rhodes Don’t waste your awkwardness. One of the saddest realities of life is that the things we need to talk about the most, we tend to talk about the least—from bouts with depression to sexual struggles to parent-wounds that never seem to heal. Raise these issues out loud, and wait for the awkward silence. But those awkward moments are precisely where we find connection with God and one another. In This is Awkward, Sammy Rhodes talks directly, honestly, and hilariously (because sometimes we need to laugh) about the most painfully uncomfortable subjects in our lives. In chapters like “Parents Are a Gift…

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Live Interview with Ellen Stimson and An Old-Fashioned Christmas: Sweet Traditions for Hearth and Home

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Celebrate the beauty and charm of the holidays with recipes for traditional food and drink, decorating ideas, and heartwarming stories. With its trademark snow, piney forests, sleigh rides and woodsmoke curling out of village chimneys, New England was practically invented for the Christmas postcard. It’s got your Christmas goose and the maple syrup you are gonna use to glaze it. It’s most of the reason author Ellen Stimson made Vermont her home. Here she shares recipes that have been in her family for generations, mixes up a cocktail or two, and invites readers to make their own traditions. 75 color photographs Leave a comment below to enter to win a copy of the book! Meet the Author ELLEN STIMSON is…

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Failed It/Nailed It: Which of these Fractured Fairy Tales Got it Right?

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Failed It: Ella Enchanted I first read Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine when I was 14 years old. I was immediately captivated by the story: it’s a loose retelling of Cinderella, but with way more mythical creatures and a headstrong heroine named Ella, who’s “blessed” as a child with the gift of obedience. But the gift—given by a clueless, but kind-hearted, fairy named Lucinda—is more of a curse, forcing Ella to agree to anything anyone asks of her. Because she can’t refuse, she puts herself and those she loves in danger and becomes prey to some truly nasty stepsisters. It’s not until she meets and falls in love with Charmont (or Char for short), the prince of Frell, that…

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Video: Missed It? Live Interview with Greg O’Brien and On Pluto: Inside the Mind of Alzheimer’s

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This is a book about living with Alzheimer’s, not dying with it. It is a book about hope, faith, and humor—a prescription far more powerful than the conventional medication available today to fight this disease. Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S.—and the only one of these diseases on the rise. More than 5 million Americans have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia; about 35 million people worldwide. Greg O’Brien, an award-winning investigative reporter, has been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s and is one of those faceless numbers. Acting on long-term memory and skill coupled with well-developed journalistic grit, O’Brien decided to tackle the disease and his imminent decline by writing frankly about the journey.…

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Christopher Moore Talks about Death, Demons and Secondhand Souls

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When it comes to the comically absurd, Christopher Moore wrote the book. Several of them, in fact. From his first novel, Practical Demonkeeping (1992), to his most recent, Secondhand Souls (William Morrow, August 25), Moore has spun tales featuring vampires, lust-lizards, a talking fruit bat, stupid angels, Shakespearean fools and Jesus Christ himself—all of which are not only played for plenty of laughs, but loads of social commentary, as well.               In Secondhand Souls, a sequel to Moore’s 2006 novel A Dirty Job, the stakes are nothing less than life and Death itself. In the new book, people are dying in San Francisco (hey, that’s life, right?), but their souls aren’t being collected as…

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Why she said “enough already!” to New Year’s resolutions

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New Year, new you. Wait, what’s wrong with the old me? Suddenly I’m not good enough? New Year’s resolutions used to be the stick with which I’d beat myself up annually. I wasn’t thin enough. Fit enough. Prolific enough. I wasn’t flossing after every meal. And what about that $200 microdermabrasian thingie I only used twice? It was a short list, but the stick grew longer with each passing year as: The five pounds I’d resolved to lose crept off and on. The excuses for not working out outnumbered the times I did. My daily word count refused to budge. The vicious cycle would begin again the following year. Then one year I thought, what if I resolved to make…

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From online to on the shelf: Vloggers turned authors

in Fiction by

This week, a novel called Girl Online gained national attention when it was named the fastest selling debut ever—selling 78,000 units in its first week. It’s a pretty incredible feat when you realize the author, Zoe Sugg, got her start by vlogging personal videos and beauty tutorials on her YouTube channel, Zoella. The novel tells the story of Penny, a blogger (write what you know!) who falls in love with an American musician. And while Sugg is currently facing backlash after admitting to using a ghostwriter, the numbers don’t lie—her book sales and YouTube views are through the roof.   But Sugg is just one of many video bloggers who are transitioning from YouTube to publishing. Here are three more…

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