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Children

Interview with Maxine Rosaler, Author of “Queen for a Day”

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It is bold work to invite us into the world of children who are eligible for special education—and their long suffering parents. Maxine Rosaler does this in her novel, Queen for a Day, through her main character, Mimi Slavitt and her young son, Danny. We, the audience, are alongside Mimi as she attempts to accept and comprehend her autistic son’s world. In the process, Mimi — and so we the readers — are introduced to the other mothers and their children, whom she encounters along the path, and the social system that provides aid. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2015-2016, 6.7 million students between the ages of three and 21 received special education services. Among the…

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Women’s History Month: 3 Heroines to Share With Your Daughter

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It’s Women’s History Month and we are looking forward to all the events and books that celebrate the impact that women have on the world. In addition to bringing you the latest pop culture news and reviews where women are the focus, this month, we are also going to share with you some of the best BookTrib articles of the past that celebrate women and diversity.  Today, we feature this piece from March 11th, 2015 about three heroines you can share with you daughter. When it comes to books, my 8-year-old girl is a reader with a broad palette. She loves princesses. Then again, she loves super heroes. She loves magic, adventure and inanimate objects that come to life (I’m looking at you, Olaf…

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New ‘A Wrinkle in Time’ Trailer is Meg-nificent

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During the American Music Awards on November 19th, Disney debuted the second trailer for the upcoming movie of Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time. Like our first look at the film, this latest trailer highlights the battle of light vs. darkness that young Meg Murry (Storm Reid) is thrust into while trying to find her absent father. This time around, we also get to hear more from Meg herself and see her fantastic brain and heart in action. RELATED: The Re-Read: A Wrinkle in Time A Wrinkle in Time looks aesthetically stunning, and I’m confident that the movie, like the book, will help young girls realize they can be capable heroes like Meg — always a nice change of pace…

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‘He Never Deserved Me’: Marrying for Culture, Not Love is a Recipe for Disaster

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Sometimes, things are not exactly what they seem to be. When we were writing He Never Deserved Me, the subject came up of how I ended up marrying my husband. My best friend kept on saying that it was an arranged marriage and I would explain to her that it wasn’t. Why don’t you be the judge of that? In my society, it was understood and never questioned by anyone that a potential husband should be from a specific social class, the same as mine or higher and of the same ethnic group as me. He also had to be older than me because that meant he was financially settled and had the capabilities to support me in the way I…

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‘No Good Reasons At All’: A Literary View of the Full Implications of War

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Reckless saber-rattling with an unstable despot and growing nuclear power in North Korea, sixteen years of fighting in Afghanistan, insurmountable issues in the Middle East, irrational bigotry and hatred consuming far too many, an enemy power’s blatant interference with the sovereignty of our electoral process, terrorism both domestic and foreign, indiscriminately striking every corner of the world, American soldiers dying in far away places we didn’t even know we had a presence, an administration neither aware or concerned with the potential implications of entering into war and by all appearances far too eager to do so – all issues that take place in our country. We live in challenging times. Given the implications of modern warfare, if we make a…

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Disney Pixar’s ‘Coco,’ Not Just for Kids

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For the past few years, Disney has been turning our favorite classic stories into live-action films.  These revivals remind us that sometimes, kids movies aren’t just for kids. In theaters this holiday season is Disney Pixar’s Coco, a beautifully animated film that takes place in Mexico. Lucky for us, the companion book Coco: A Story about Music, Shoes, and Family, has been released for us, as well! Twelve-year old Miguel Rivera just wants to be a famous musician, like his idol Ernesto de la Cruz, the most famous musician and film star in Mexico’s history. But Miguel’s family has a generation-old ban on music, and tell him to focus on the shoe-making shop that family runs, instead. A desperate attempt to prove his musical…

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Abduction and Raw Emotion in ‘The Atlas of Forgotten Places’

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Don’t let this exceptional new novel fall under the radar! Based on war-torn Africa and the innocent people caught in the middle, the stunning debut of The Atlas of Forgotten Places by Jenny D. Williams takes us to Uganda where a young girl, Lily, goes missing. The authorities are hard to come by and disorganized, so her aunt Sabine, a former aid worker, travels from Germany to the village where she was last seen. She intends to trace Lily’s steps and try to understand if she was in danger and kidnapped, or if she had a motive to disappear. At the same time a Ugandan woman, Rose (who was previously kidnapped and abused by the Lord’s Resistance Army but now back in…

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13 Authors on Banning Books and Censorship

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. It’s Banned Books Week, an annual celebration of the right to read. Launched in 1982, Banned Books Week was a response to an increase in the number of books being challenged by groups and individuals. Here, we’ve rounded up the perspectives of thirteen authors—from Roxane Gay to Kurt Vonnegut—on challenged books, book banning, and censorship. “I don’t believe that books, even bad books, corrupt us. Instead, I believe books challenge and interrogate. They give us windows into the lives of others and give us mirrors so that we can better see ourselves. And ultimately, if you have a worldview that can be undone by a novel, let me submit that the problem is not…

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‘A House Among the Trees’ is Chock Full of Eccentric, Detailed Characters

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In author Julia Glass’s latest character-driven novel, A House Among the Trees, Mort Lear, a famous children’s author, vaguely reminiscent of Maurice Sendak, unexpectedly falls to his death off the roof of his Connecticut home in a fluke accident. His longtime, live-in assistant Tomasina (Tommy) is left to pick up the pieces, address his fortune, complete unfinished business and come to terms with their co-dependent relationship. In addition, surprising details of Morty’s past surface, causing Tommy to question how well she actually knew him. When Tommy was a child she saw an eccentric man sketching pictures of her little brother as she watched over him on the playground. She gave the man the O.K. to continue as long as her…

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Pauline Lévêque and Florence Mars: The Culture of Raising Children

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If you lived abroad for an extended period, even simply during a semester off while in college, you know that cultures are nothing alike. There is as much in common between Russian and Portuguese bread than between a whale and a tiger. That is what gives the world its colors and texture. There has been a bevy of books about raising children in foreign countries of late. France and Paris seem to be the major targets of this topic. A mother forced to live abroad because her husband’s multi-national has relocated the family to a distant land or simply a single mom in search of new adventures learn quickly that, in France, things are not quite the same as in…

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You Can’t Reboot a Book: The Beauty in Reading to Your Children

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It’s interactive, it will transport you from one time and world into the next, but most importantly, it builds lasting relationships. Today, getting children to focus is a challenge—there’s media everywhere. Lights, sounds, internet games; that’s enough to distract anybody, let alone a child who’s in the developing stages of life. We all know that children are sponges, but what is it that they are absorbing? Be it a cell phone, gaming console, or computer, the synergy is between the child and the machine. What is it that they are learning? Is this machine an extension of them? There are plenty of scifi novels and movies that tell us where that might get us. When you read a book to…

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Parenting is Tough: ‘Listen’ Helps Build a Roadmap to a Happier, Healthier Family

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Any parent will tell you, raising children is a lot of work and one of the most challenging jobs anyone could take on in life. The rewards, of course, highly outweigh the tough times, but it’s just not easy. That’s why there are books upon books dedicated to helping you raise your child(ren). Some are better than others, some are more effective for different types of families; it’s really all about what works for you and what doesn’t because every child is different. Enter Patty Wipfler and Tosha Schore, M.A., the authors of Listen: Five Simple Tools to Meet Your Everyday Parenting Challenges (Hand in Hand Parenting, August 23, 2016). Wipfler and Schore set up a fool-proof way to help…

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Video: Missed It? Interview with Rupert Isaacson and The Long Ride Home

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When his son Rowan was diagnosed with autism, Rupert Isaacson feared they might never communicate. But when he discovered Rowan responded to horses, they traveled to Mongolia–the spiritual home of the horse–where shaman banished the tantrums, the incontinence, and the hopeless isolation. A year later, Rowan started regressing. Only then did Rupert remember the shaman had told him that they must make three more healing journeys. So they went: to the Bushmen of Namibia and Australia’s coastal rainforests, and to America’s Navajo reservation, discovering new ways of connecting with autistic children using nature, movement, and animals, unlocking children from their most severe symptoms and developing two internationally known programs: Horse Boy Method and Movement Method. The Long Ride Home is…

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Eyes on the Prize! Giveaways!

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Comment for a chance to win one of this week’s brand spanking new titles. A Thousand Miles from Nowhere by John Gregory Brown Fleeing New Orleans as Hurricane Katrina approaches, Henry Garrett is haunted by the ruins of his marriage, a squandered inheritance, and the teaching job he inexplicably quit. He pulls into a small Virginia town after three days on the road, hoping to silence the ceaseless clamor in his head. But this quest for peace and quiet as the only guest at a roadside motel is destroyed when Henry finds himself at the center of a bizarre and violent tragedy. As a result, Henry winds up stranded at the ramshackle motel just outside the small town of Marimore,…

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Video: Missed It? Interview with Meredith Scott Lynn and Write Brain Books

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WRiTE BRAiN BOOKS are richly illustrated, textless books, with lines on the pages, ready for any writer’s content. They are designed to ignite and inspire creativity and imagination in kids of all ages. Our books enable kids to write their own stories, publish beautiful hardcover copies, and build a personal library of self-authored books. From President & CEO Meredith Scott Lynn One early September morning, I was in San Francisco visiting my sister Marcy and her family for a long weekend of “Auntie M” time with my ten-month-old niece Lila, a.k.a. “LilaBean”. Marcy asked if I would read to Lila so that she could take a long shower, something new moms don’t get enough of. I leaned over to reach…

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TED Talks: Andrew Solomon on Parents, Children and the Search for Identity

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Thanksgiving is all about family and the stress and joy that come with reconnecting. Family is also the theme of Andrew Solomon’s “Love No Matter What” talk from TEDMED 2013, in which he explores the ways family and identity develop in the face of extraordinary circumstances. Solomon shares the deeply personal stories of parents whose children are different from them in surprising and poignant ways—children living with what society views as disabilities, gifted children, troubled children, children whose inner identities pushed cultural norms. The result is a touching look at how families negotiate love and acceptance for their children, and the importance of embracing identity. Solomon’s sometimes funny, sometimes heart-wrenching talk is one of the most inspiring TED has to…

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