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Neil Nyren

Neil Nyren has 8 articles published.

Neil Nyren
Neil Nyren retired at the end of 2017 as the Executive VP, associate publisher and editor in chief of G.P. Putnam's Sons. He is the winner of the 2017 Ellery Queen Award from the Mystery Writers of America. Among his authors of crime and suspense were Clive Cussler, Ken Follett, C.J. Box, John Sandford, Robert Crais, Jack Higgins, W.E.B. Griffin, Frederick Forsyth, Randy Wayne White, Alex Berenson, Ace Atkins, and Carol O'Connell. He also worked with such writers as Tom Clancy, Patricia Cornwell, Daniel Silva, Martha Grimes, Ed McBain, Carl Hiaasen, and Jonathan Kellerman. He is currently writing a monthly publishing column for the MWA newsletter The Third Degree, as well as a regular ITW-sponsored series on debut thriller authors for BookTrib.com; and is an editor at large for CrimeReads.

Ancient Truths, Modern Evil, in Hearts of the Missing

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The spirit of Tony Hillerman hovers over every page of Carol Potenza’s debut novel Hearts of the Missing (Minotaur), so it’s no surprise that, when still unpublished, it won the 2017 Hillerman Prize for the best first mystery set in the Southwest. Hillerman’s spirit is far from the only ghost that haunts it, however. The book features Nicky Matthews, a woman police sergeant for New Mexico’s Fire-Sky Pueblo, the Tsiba’ashi D’yini. She is also a Bureau of Indian Affairs-trained federal agent often brought in as a liaison with the Office of Medical Investigation on matters of cultural sensitivity. But Nicky is not a Native. She is white, and she knows that her training is no replacement for all she has yet…

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Opium and Identity: 19th Century Woman Battles Crime

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Port Townsend, Washington, 1887. An ex-Pinkerton agent named Alma Rosales is hunting for opium stolen from her employer, criminal boss Delphine Beaumond, one of the most dangerous women in the Northwest. Also on the hunt is a dockworker named Jack Camp, a rough brawler with his own plans for the opium. Neither knows for sure whom to trust, for each knows all too well that in Port Townsend, nobody is who he or she seems to be. One peculiarity, for instance, is that Alma Rosales and Jack Camp are the same person. The Best Bad Things  (MCD) is a terrific historical crime novel, filled with action, atmosphere, twists, and glorious writing, but it is also a direct challenge to the…

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Vanished Lives-Secrets in “Find Me Gone”

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Find Me Gone  (Harper) is unusual in many respects — in its story, its author, and the creation of the book itself. Belgian author Sarah Meuleman says it is the sum of everything she has been and done in her life: a singer-songwriter, a journalist, a television host, a writer and managing editor at Vogue magazine. “I used to sing [her album More Than Meets the I, under the name SAM, was released in 2003], and sound is pivotal to me: how sentences flow, rumble, and roll. My background in journalism strengthens me in weaving the story, and the acting and presenting helps tremendously with writing dialogue. I feel that each sidestep I’ve ever made has added significantly to the…

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Stuart Turton’s Intricate Plot Bends Minds and Genres

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This may very well be the twistiest, most intricate crime novel you’ll read this year. A tall order, I know, given the competition, but trust me on this. The author, Stuart Turton, calls it “an Agatha Christie mystery in a Groundhog Day loop, with a bit of Quantum Leap.” Others have invoked Gosford Park, Inception, and “Downton Abbey with a body count.” They are all correct. The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle (Sourcebooks Landmark) opens with the narrator waking up in a remote forest, wearing someone else’s dinner jacket and, he realizes, someone else’s body. Making his way to a large country house, he discovers a party in full swing, and a masked figure who informs him that a murder…

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Howard Michael Gould’s Hollywood Thriller “Last Looks”

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“What a world the man lived in: Phony friends with phony laughter, phony police walking phony streets, phony adversaries throwing phony punches after phony kisses from phony lovers.” Those are the thoughts of Charlie Waldo, an ex-cop who’s gotten sucked into a Hollywood murder case, in Howard Michael Gould’s first novel, Last Looks (Dutton). A one-time super-cop who spectacularly messed up a triple-murder investigation, he reacted to it all by burning his life down and retreating to the woods, where he lives alone in a tiny cabin and owns exactly one hundred possessions – if anything new is added, something else has to go. Alone, that is, until an old girlfriend and PI named Lorena drives out to recruit his help…

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Caged: A Serial Killer Novel With a Difference

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Caged is not your typical serial killer novel. “A few years ago,” says Ellison Cooper, “I was looking for something to read and jokingly told my partner that I wished there were a crime thriller that incorporated neurology, archaeology, and dogs. It was like being struck by lightning. I couldn’t boot up my computer fast enough.” The book features an FBI Special Agent named Sayer Altair, a woman with the FBI’s Critical Incident Response Group, responsible for investigating such events as school shootings, random gunmen, and serial killings. But her interest in the latter is very particular – she is also a neuroscientist studying the neurology of violence. Is it possible to pinpoint something specific in the brain? Is there any way to predict…

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Jeremy Finley Debut Journeys into the Unimaginable

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Jeremy Finley is a hard-nosed professional. As the chief investigative reporter for the NBC-affiliated television station in Nashville, he’s spent more than 15 years exposing corruption, financial abuse, and criminal activity, and won some of the highest honors in journalism, including multiple Emmys, Edward R. Murrow awards, and IRE (Investigative Reporters and Editors) awards. It’s also led him down some very unexpected paths: “My day job is so rooted in proof – in verifying facts and seeking documentation of everything – I’m a bit obsessed that we still haven’t been able to come to a true conclusion about alien abductions and strange lights in the sky. And the Loch Ness monster. And Bigfoot. This is why I don’t sleep at…

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*NEW COLUMN* Chasing Phantoms: Copenhaver’s Debut, ‘Dodging and Burning’ is an ‘Hommage to Pulp Fiction’

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One of the things that makes BookTrib special is our commitment to connecting readers to writers, editors and experts in the business of books! That is why we have partnered with the International Thriller Writers (ITW) to help discover debut thriller writers. Our new column features reviews by veteran editor, Neil Nyren. Nyren retired at the end of 2017 as the EVP, Associate Publisher, and Editor-in-Chief of G.P. Putnam’s Sons (a division of Penguin Random House). He is the winner of the 2017 Ellery Queen Award and over the course of his career,  has edited 294 New York Times bestsellers, including books by Larry King, Andy Rooney, Tom Clancy, Senator Harry Reid and Wayne Gretzky. We are thrilled to have Neil bring…

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