Author

Katie Hires

Katie Hires has 96 articles published.

Katie Hires is a book lover, pop culture nerd, and graphic designer. When she's not researching Game of Thrones fan theories, she's either reading or at home making pasta.

Presenting: The Real Housewives of Classic Literature!

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Everyone loves The Real Housewives! OK, to be fair, not everyone is aware of how magical the Real Housewives can be on occasion. While a lot of people find them irritating, where else are you going to find crazy moments where weird rich women debase themselves like insane animals in a menagerie for we the people to marvel at? No matter what your opinion is on The Real Housewives franchise, it’s hard to deny that they’re a bonafide cultural phenomenon. Love them or hate them, their hilarious quips, wild cat fights and generally unblinking attitude towards affluence are here to stay. So, if we were to cast a new season of Real Housewives, populated by some of the most desperate…

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A Demonic Book List for Fox’s The Exorcist Miniseries!

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Halloween is coming early! Lately, it feels like everything is being remade for television, from Lethal Weapon to the Divergent movies (apparently). So, when we heard that Fox was remaking The Exorcist as a miniseries, we were a bit dubious. Seriously? You’re remaking what is thought to be the greatest horror film of all time, based on one of the scariest novels of all time, which was inspired by a real-life case of demonic possession in 1949? You’ve got to be kidding. Then, we saw the trailer:   Wait, was that Geena Davis? And Cameron from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off? And spooky child exorcisms in orangey-lit settings? And weird birds crashing into windows?? And the old-school theme music from the…

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Review: The Weird Greatness of Nathan Hill’s “The Nix”

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A lot of people have called Nathan Hill’s debut novel, The Nix (Knopf, August 30, 2016), one of the best of the year. They’re absolutely right. This willfully sprawling, imperfectly ambitious novel contains so many shades of other books that I love that, upon reflection, it’s startling to consider the unique sort of excellence Hill has been able to achieve. To inadequately sum up a massive, 620 page novel, the story follows the relationship between an aloof son and his estranged mother. Samuel Andresen-Anderson, a 30-something college English professor obsessed with “World of Elfscape,” starts researching the life of his mother, Faye, after she gets caught on camera throwing rocks at a horrible politician. She had abandoned him without warning…

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The Books on Bridget Jones’s Imaginary Bookshelf

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It’s hard to fully encapsulate the amazingness that is Bridget Jones’s Diary. Helen Fielding’s book is fantastic, and the movie is even better. (Seriously, come at me). Between the most relatable female heroine ever, the objectively least-crazy-most-sensible-while-still-being-attractive leading man, and quite possibly the greatest, least graceful fight scene in movie history, 2001’s Bridget Jones’s Diary is my favorite romantic comedy film. It will never be beaten. It will never be surpassed. It is flawless. The sequel was bitterly disappointing. Let’s not talk about it. However, whether we like it or not, Bridget Jones is having a baby. Preliminary reviews for the new film are fairly positive, which I’m taking as a good sign. It’s being directed by the original film’s…

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These Emmy Award Nominees Exist Thanks to 6 Amazing Books!

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The 68th Emmy Awards are right around the corner! Television is pretty easy to love, but it’s even easier to love when it comes attached to a little reading material. Plus, you know that here at BookTrib, we are completely obligated to only root for shows that are based on books (sorry Mr. Robot). So, without further ado, here are our favorite shows up for an Emmy (and the books they’re based on)!   A Game of Thrones, George R.R. Martin (Bantam Reprint, 2011) This first one is no secret. In fact, the divergences between HBO’s hit show and Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire book series have caused alternating bouts of outrage and curiosity from fans of the…

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Review: Captivated by the Harrowing and Heartfelt ‘Shelter in Place’

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Have you ever felt like a giant black bird is clawing at your heart, or like your body is completely immobilized by black tar flowing through your veins? It may be hard to imagine what that really feels like, but for the protagonist of Alexander Maksik’s latest novel, Shelter in Place (Europa Editions, September 13, 2016) it’s a state of being that’s nearly inescapable. Those two images are the main descriptors Maksik uses to characterize his narrator Joe’s Bipolar symptoms, that are further complicated by the hectic story of Joe’s life, which Maksik traces from the early ’90s to the present day in a nonlinear design. Set in a few different cities in the Pacific Northwest, the meat of the story…

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It’s Not Over! Extend Your Summer with These Beachy Novels

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Even though it’s still sunny out, tree leaves are still green and the beaches are still open, autumn is clearly rearing its head. It’s just a little bit cooler in early mornings and kids have gone back to school — but never fear! Instead of lamenting summer’s death throes, do what people have always done since the dawn of time: completely deny something is happening until it’s here! We intend to keep reading beachy, summery reads until most of the leaves are off the trees, anyway. So, in honor of endless summers, here’s a book list to help you keep the feeling of these long, warm days!   Love Her Madly: A Novel, M. Elizabeth Lee (Atria Books, August 16, 2016)…

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A Drug Cartel-fueled Book List for All Narcos Lovers!

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If you haven’t watched Netflix’s Narcos yet, you need to rectify that situation immediately. It follows the story of history’s most infamous drug kingpin, Pablo Escobar, whose Colombian cocaine empire made him one of the richest men in the world in the early 1990s. Season 1, which premiered in 2015, followed Escobar’s life from the late ’70s through the ’90s, in addition to the stories of DEA agents who pursued him. Season 2 picks up right where the first part of the story left off – with a daring and ultimately vulnerable prison escape.   While we’re waiting for the return of Wagner Moura’s chilling portrayal of Escobar on September 2, we put together a reading list to give you…

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Who Run the World?! 7 Books for Women’s Equality Day

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First thing’s first – here’s the soundtrack for this article:   On this glorious day, August 26, in the glorious year of 1920, the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was certified as law. For anyone not up on their Constitutional Amendments (YOU SHOULD BE), that’s the one that gave women the right to vote. So, to commemorate the date, we have Women’s Equality Day, a holiday that celebrates ladies getting a right we should have had from the very beginning. Women’s Equality Day is a well-intentioned holiday that’s still a bit touchy, mainly because the subject of women’s equality is still about as frustrating and divisive as it was in 1920. The gender wage gap is still a…

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Summer Reading: Books for Firefly Evenings

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It is a truth universally acknowledged that fireflies are one of the best things about summer. They’re the beautiful glowy harbingers of lazy evenings that you stay outside to watch, even if the mosquitoes are getting at your ankles.    So, as summer dwindles down, let’s take a moment to appreciate one of nature’s most hypnotizing and lovely creatures! Well, actually, we’ll need more than a few moments, because we’ve picked out the perfect firefly-themed books for you to read during summer evenings before the season ends. Firefly Summer, Nan Rossiter (Kensington, July 26, 2016) This moving novel of love and loss is a really contemplative read that’s perfect for peaceful summer evenings. It tells the story of the four…

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In Case You Missed It: You Can Physically Walk into This Amazon Bookstore!

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In the world of OMG-I-had-no-idea-this-existed, Amazon has an actual brick-and-mortar bookstore in Seattle, WA. Located in the same city as the Amazon headquarters, the store actually opened in November 2015! It doesn’t matter if this is kind of old news, this bookstore looks pretty awesome. The books are displayed face-out to make shopping more pleasant on the eye, and books aren’t just sorted by category — they’re sorted by their Amazon ranking/reviews! Plus, the books are pretty cheap; if they’re on sale online, then they’re on sale in the store as well. While you might not have the quirky selections you can get in an independent bookstore, the books are organized according to what’s popular based on rank and ratings,…

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The Other, Other George R.R. Martin Series Comes to Television: Wild Cards

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Superheroes are clearly super hot right now. So is the hit HBO television series Game of Thrones, based on George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire fantasy novels, which is hot off its extremely well-received sixth season. “Hmm, if only there was a way to capitalize on the success of both these franchises…” one lonely television executive wondered wistfully. Well, some wishes do come true. As it turns out, Universal Cable Productions has acquired the exclusive rights to adapt Martin’s Wild Cards series for television. What is Wild Cards, you ask? Well, to call it Game of Thrones with superheroes would be an unfair boiling-down of a truly unique and fantastic tapestry of heroic science fiction-y novels and…

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Review: Dive Into Psychological Mystery on Peregrine Island

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Tolstoy said that every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. Diane B. Saxton, the debut author of Peregrine Island (She Writes Press, August 2, 2016), would probably agree. Her new novel dives into a memorably dysfunctional family, the Peregrines, living on the titular private island on Long Island Sound. Three generations of women live there: Winter, the calculating matriarch, her rebellious adult daughter, Elsie, and her child daughter, Peda. The novel alternates between these three very distinct viewpoints – giving readers the impression of an isolated family wrapped up in years of internal angst. This serves to heighten the sense of mystery when the main story comes into play. It’s hard to describe what’s going on in Peregrine…

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Who the Hell Are These People? A Suicide Squad Breakdown!

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There’s a lot of hype around the new Suicide Squad movie — and it’s not hard to see why. The cast looks ridiculous, the posters have been delightfully comic-y, and the trailers have been straight up awesome:   Comic book fans seem to be happy about a movie that looks fun and excitable, rather than aping the whole edgy-to-the-point-of-dour vibe that The Dark Knight series started. However, I humbly offer a completely fair question: who exactly are these people? Despite how entertaining this movie looks, it’s weird that people are so excited for a movie featuring what amounts to (mostly) B-squad supervillains. OK, they get sent into high-risk missions for the government because, as criminals, they’re expendable. Got it. Sure,…

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Go Team USA: Inspiring Books to Get You in the 2016 Summer Olympics Spirit!

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Ahhh, the Olympics: the magical time of year when you’re allowed to chant “USA! USA! USA!” un-ironically with your face painted like Old Glory. But while this week marks the kick off of the 2016 Summer Olympics, this year’s Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro seem a little different, amidst controversy about the water in Rio, concerns about the Zika Virus, debates about nation-wide bans due to doping and anxiety over event security, these Games seem more than a little hectic and apprehensive. Despite the (valid) trepidations many have over the Summer Olympic Games, fundamentally, the Olympics are a time to celebrate. The world is already pretty crazy, so it’s helpful to remember that people are, in fact, capable of coming…

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Take a Time Out: Happy National Dance Day!

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July 30 is National Dance Day! Instead of sitting on your bum and chillin’ on the couch, put that book to the side for just a few minutes and get in some good exercise — the fun way. Get down and boogie to celebrate this happiest of American holidays (which you probably didn’t hear about until right now). Whether your’re a jitterer, a gyrator, a ballerina, or a stand-with-your-hands-in-your-pockets-and-nod kind of dancer, everyone can crack a smile and do a little jig. Enjoy this fantastic high-energy playlist put together by the BookTrib writers for your dancing pleasure! Dance Move Examples:             Main Image: Courtesy ABC, via Bigstock.

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