Author

JeriAnn Geller

JeriAnn Geller has 78 articles published.

is a writer, editor and dabbler in arty stuff. A fourth-generation journalist (on her father’s side) and millionteenth-generation mother (on her mother’s side) she has written, edited, photographed and illustrated for newspapers, magazines, websites, blogs, videos and books. Known for her persnicketyness about grammar, she occasionally leaves in an error to delight people of similar inclination.

Amazon No. 1 New Release ‘The Cooking Gene’ Talks Food Traditions in the Old South

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Like the author himself, The Cooking Gene (Amistad, August 1, 2017) by Michael W. Twitty defies easy categorization. Not quite a memoir, nor historical nonfiction, nor a cookbook, it combines elements of all three to take us on a historical journey that shows how African foodways formed and informed the American diet and how the history of a people can be writ large in the food they ate. When Twitty approached publishers about his work as a culinary historian investigating the African-American roots of Southern cuisine, he was told that his identity was too complex and his work didn’t fit neatly into any one genre. But his unique, intersectional perspective as an African-American gay Jew brings insight to every facet of…

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Real-Life Indiana Jones Gary Vikan Reveals the Truth about World’s Art Treasures

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Anyone who has seen an Indiana Jones movie has regarded it with a sense of disbelief. Would an Ivy League scholar with a doctorate in ancient history really find himself in the middle of all kinds of shady characters, sketchy situations and stolen art? According to Gary Vikan Ph.D., an expert in late ancient and early medieval art who has helped collect priceless artwork for leading museums, duplicitous government officials and shady dealers are par for the course. In fact, it’s the art world’s dirty little secret—the glittering treasures on their pedestals and priceless paintings in their burnished frames that adorn museum walls are often either stolen or forged. How often? According to Newsweek, the U.S. Department of Justice and…

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So, You Want to be a Writer? Keep Reading!

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I’m sampling canapés at a party when someone walks up with a J.K. Rowling gleam in their eye. “I hear that you’re an editor. I have this great idea for a book, but I’m not sure how to get started. What do you recommend?” As I stifle the urge to fling the hummus in their general direction, I recommend those classics that I’ve long used for classes, writing workshops and myself: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction (Harper Perennial, 2006) by William Zinsser, Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott (Anchor, 1995), and Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within by Natalie Goldberg (Shambhala, 2005). For guys, I’ll usually toss in Stephen…

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Happy International Cat Day: The World’s Greatest Cat Fort and Jackson Galaxy’s Book to Solve Cat Rebellion

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As a human who has been owned by cats throughout my life (see what I did there?), I was totally enchanted when a friend sent me a link to BuzzFeed’s article on The World’s Greatest Cat Fort. I’ve long been tempted to create a cat habitat in my home, but I’m not blessed with the square footage of the young BuzzFeed staffers who made a castle worthy of Jenkins the cat. However, I love how creative and easy this DIY project looks and can see how a smaller fortress might come together with some PVC pipe, duct tape and a couple of boxes. Clearly I’m not alone in wanting a cat-friendly environment especially today, on International Cat Day. This video…

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Smart Reads: Get Lost in the World of the Graphic Novel

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Back in the day growing up meant you could read books without pictures. Now some of the smartest books not only have pictures, they’re the hybrid children of literature and comic books called graphic novels. These illustrated gems can go places where no print novel is able to tread—adding cinematic wonder and visual pacing and tone to a complex narrative. There’s a huge variety out there in every genre, but we’ve picked a few of our recent favorites for this Smart Reads column that are sure to make you a fan of the art form. Agatha: The Real Life of Agatha Christie by Anne Martinetti, Guillaume Lebeau and Alexandre Franc (SelfMadeHero, May 10, 2016) “Uncovering some of the hard truths…

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Romance Writers of America Takes a Stand for Diversity

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The folks who love to write about love are taking a stand for inclusivity. The Romance Writers of America released a statement on April 4, 2016 making it absolutely clear where they stand on the subject of inclusivity for members from the LGBTQ community. This is welcome news during a time when civil rights for people who identify as gay or transgender are being eroded in several states. Important Message Regarding 2005 “Definition of Romance” Survey At the November 2015 Board of Directors meeting, one of the issues discussed was an RWA survey conducted in 2005. Though this occurred eleven years ago, the ill effects of that survey still linger for many members. The survey was included in the Romance Writers…

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5 (Totally True) Historical Surprises in Steve Berry’s ‘The 14th Colony’

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We love Steve Berry’s novels; they’re like Cracker Jack boxes with a historical surprise inside. Who would have suspected the shocking twists in The King’s Deception (the first transgender royal) or The Columbus Affair (the explorer was looking for a Jewish sanctuary)? What you may not have realized is that 90 percent of what you read about history in a Berry novel is true. (The guy does need a little wiggle room to bring the thrills!) That being said, all of Berry’s ideas are the result of careful research, in person and through in-depth reading. “I read upward of 200 to 300 books before I put the first word on the page,” he says. Berry’s newest thriller, The 14th Colony:…

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Smart Reads: 6 Memoirs That Examine the Author’s Own History

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We love history here at BookTrib, which is why we featured 5 Fascinating Books that Shed a Fresh Light on History in February. But when we sat down to plan our Women’s History Month Smart Reads, we decided to take a slightly different angle. We wanted to feature women who are telling contemporary stories about their own lives. So here are six memoirs that explore family dynamics, grief and loss, redemption, reinvention, violence and peace, and that enduring thing called love. Red Eggs and Good Luck: A Memoir by Angela Lam (She Writes Press; October 6, 2015) “Red Eggs and Good Luck is the kind of honest, beautifully written memoir that will have you staying up way too late turning…

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Listen: Steve Berry and Raymond Khoury Play Shadow Tag

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Ten years ago FBI agent Sean Reilly and retired Justice Department operative Cotton Malone had separate Templar adventures. Reilly, the popular sleuth from Raymond Khoury, and Malone, the brainchild of Steve Berry, have never had an adventure together—until now. In the e-book Shadow Tag Berry and Khoury have teamed up for a fast, furious and funny novella that brings the pair to England in search of two missing specialists and a plot that involves a couple of oddly familiar writer types. In this entertaining and enlightening podcast, New York Times bestselling authors talk about the art of collaboration, their beloved characters and how it feels to be a character in your own fiction. About Steve Berry STEVE BERRY is the New…

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5 Things We Need from Ruth Bader Ginsburg Book Publishing in 2017

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Trust me when I say this—Ruth Bader Ginsburg rocks. There’s a good reason why she’s affectionately known as The Notorious RBG. About a dozen years ago I had the great pleasure to meet the U.S. Supreme Court Justice and I’ve been a fan ever since. She’s brilliant, feisty, dedicated and outspoken. When she was asked when there will be enough women on the Supreme Court she shot back, “When there’s nine.” She pointed out that no one was shocked when there were nine men. Why shouldn’t there be nine women? You can imagine my delight when I learned that Ginsburg and her authorized biographers are preparing a book of her writings and speeches, My Own Words, due out from Simon &…

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Smart Reads: 4 Cookbooks Dedicated to Sustainable Eating

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Farewell, chunky soups. Adios, crockpot chili. Arrivederci, baked pasta. It’s 70 degrees in New England and I’ve got a hankering for something spring-y. As much as I love those hearty, cozy and  comforting, cold-weather meals and the way they make the house smell like every happy memory from childhood, it’s time for something light, bright, clean and green. Warmer temperatures make me want to indulge in those shimmering jewels newly emerging from the farm. Fortunately, we have the scoop on the newest books of the season—including a sneak preview of a couple of gems out in May. So get ready to savor these delectable cookbooks that will snap you out of the winter doldrums. The Plantiful Table: Easy, From-the-Farm Recipes…

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Jennifer Lee and Ava DuVernay to Bring ‘A Wrinkle in Time’ to the Big Screen

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A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle started all the trouble. I had never seen a book like it—a story that ventured into outer space that included siblings, science, stars, strange civilizations, tesseracts, angels and an awkward, intelligent girl who saves her father and brother. A girl like me was the heroine of a story! I was spellbound and racked up library fines as I reread it and reread it. It made me a science fiction fan and newly aware that a girl could be the hero of her own story. It was more foundational than any other book I read as a child. So it was no wonder that the interwebs thrummed with excitement when it was announced that…

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Smart Reads: 5 Fascinating Books that Shed a Fresh Light on History

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For some reason, late winter is the most historical time of the year. President’s Day. Martin Luther King Day. Black History Month. Women’s History Month. Maybe it’s because we need some really smart reads to tide us over until the daffodils bloom. If history, or fiction-driven retellings based on history, is your jam, we’ve got just the thing. Here are five fascinating books that will make you wish for a snow storm to give you a day off so you can curl up and read. Max Baer & The Star of David by Jay Neugeboren (Mandel Vilar Press; February 11, 2016) “Neugeboren has never been better than in this lush, joyful novel—as erotic and mysterious as The Song of Songs…

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The Mockingbird’s Voice is Stilled: Harper Lee Dies at 89

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Book lovers sensed Harper Lee’s secret—she was a fellow reader. In a way, her life after the astonishing overnight success of To Kill a Mockingbird was a reader’s dream. She kept a quiet existence dividing her time between her small Southern town and tiny New York City apartment, which must have allowed plenty of time to devour books without needing to interrupt a good story with such nuisances as a day job. The author, whose fame arose from what has been called the most important book of the 20th century, has passed at the age of 89. In 2006 she shared her love of books with Oprah Winfrey and readers of her magazine, O. She recalled her earliest reading experience:…

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WrestleMania Reading Challenge: What’s on the WWE Stars’ Reading List?

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There are some really smart people who have professionally wrestled for the WWE. Hardcore legend Mick Foley has written 10 books and counting. Xavier Woods is working on his Ph.D. Kofi Kingston graduated from Boston College and was an executive before his wrestling career (you know he loves books—his father is a university librarian). Glenn Jacobs, better known as Kane, actually has a degree in English literature. Michelle Callaway (aka Michelle McCool), the retired Diva’s champ, is a science teacher with a master’s degree. And David Otunga (also known for sweeping Jennifer Hudson off her feet) is a Harvard-trained lawyer. And this is just to name a few! So perhaps it’s no surprise that the WWE has teamed up with…

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