Author

JeriAnn Geller - page 3

JeriAnn Geller has 78 articles published.

is a writer, editor and dabbler in arty stuff. A fourth-generation journalist (on her father’s side) and millionteenth-generation mother (on her mother’s side) she has written, edited, photographed and illustrated for newspapers, magazines, websites, blogs, videos and books. Known for her persnicketyness about grammar, she occasionally leaves in an error to delight people of similar inclination.

Smart Reads: Real Life Heroes, Villains and Monsters

in Non-Fiction by

Villains and monsters are so much more frightening in the world of non-fiction. While we can reassure ourselves that the horrors of fiction aren’t real and sleep with the lights on, the comfort in non-fiction lies in the books themselves. By shining a light on the darkest hearts we lessen their hold upon us. At the same time, heroes are burnished in the spotlight’s glow, reminding us that good can ultimately prevail. This week we have five Smart Reads about the heroes, villains and monsters who have walked among us: My Life on the Road by Gloria Steinem (Random House, October 27, 2015) “Rarely do women have the opportunity to travel as Steinem has done—living a life full of radical…

Keep Reading

Novel Concept Episode 7: Angela Palm

in Podcasts by

Writing can be a solitary experience, which is why so many authors tend to form writing groups as sources of support both for their writing and themselves. In this episode of Novel Concept, host Rachel Carter speaks with nonfiction author Angela Palm, an occasional BookTrib contributor, about the writing group they share. It’s an intimate look into their own experiences as working writers, what they look for in a support system, and the ways writing groups have shaped their work. Palm is the author of Riverine: A Memoir from Anywhere but Here, which won the Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize and is due to be published in August 16, 2016. Her writing has appeared in Brevity, Diagram, The Pilgrim, and Little Fiction.…

Keep Reading

Shonda Rhimes Inspires Positivity with a Year of Yes!

in Non-Fiction by

Shonda Rhimes just reminded me what happens when you spend a year saying, “Yes!” to life’s possibilities. In 2008 this became my mantra. It had been a bad year—major surgery, my employer cheated out of $90 million by Bernie Madoff, massive layoffs (including me), the end of a valued relationship. My son, who was in middle school at the time, dragged me to see Jim Carrey in Yes Man. Inspired, I decided to try to turn my life around by saying “yes” for a year. As Rhimes points out in her new memoir, Year of Yes: How to Dance it Out, Stand in the Sun and Be Your Own Person (Simon & Schuster; November 10, 2015), life takes on an…

Keep Reading

Smart Reads: 7 Scrumptious New Cookbooks for You to Savor

in Non-Fiction by

Here at the BookTrib office, the cookbooks arrive in the mail about mid-morning—just in time to start our stomachs rumbling. We can’t help but be inspired to kick up our cooking game as we flip through the gorgeous photos and mouth-watering recipes. This week we have cookbooks that serve up the kind of food many of us grew up with—red velvet cake and fried chicken from Savannah, bisque and jambalya from the Big Easy, garlic-and-pepper infused pastrami from Jewish delis, and porchetta and lasagne just like your nonna used to make. And to top it all off—a cookbook from the restaurant that has all the celebrity chefs raving. Hungry yet? This is Camino by Russell Moore and Allison Hopelain with Chris…

Keep Reading

Carrie Brownstein Pauses During Book Tour to Perform a Wedding

in Potpourri by

We’re very familiar with book tours here at BookTrib; many of our writers are published authors and we work with authors every day. But this was a first for us—Carrie Brownstein paused during a speaking event for her new memoir, Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl (Riverhead Books; October 27, 2015) to marry sweethearts Kendall Oshiro and Genevieve Hernandez. Guest moderator Amy Poehler reportedly yelled out, “You gotta do it!” to applause and cheers when the couple made the request during the Q&A session. There may have been a teeny, tiny bit of planning involved on the fiancées’ part—they just happened to know that Brownstein was an ordained minister (something she did to marry a couple of friends), they had…

Keep Reading

Move Over Breaking Bad, Here Comes Jessica Jones on Netflix

in Fiction by

Is America ready for a superheroine whose story might make Breaking Bad look like a family sitcom? As someone who was lucky enough to see the first episode of Marvel’s Jessica Jones at New York Comic Con, the answer is an unequivocal, “yes!” Recently I mused as to whether Jessica could escape the Strong Female Character trope where she’s just there as a foil for the male hero. Well, the brand new trailer should leave little doubt that Ms. Jones (as well as Krysten Ritter) is a badass in her own right.   Kevin Feige, president of Marvel Studios, has frequently expressed his plan to create unique movies that just happen to contain superheroes, rather “superhero movies.” With Jessica Jones…

Keep Reading

Kitchen Bursting with Produce? Time for Home Canning!

in Potpourri by

Are your counters like mine—overflowing with the last of the tomatoes, squash from your in-laws and those plum and apple “seconds” that were too good a deal to pass up at the farmer’s market? As you survey your bounty one question keeps going through your mind, “How the heck are we going to eat all this before it spoils?” Never fear! Canning books are here. We’re not the first humans to want to preserve the sun-drenched lusciousness of summer for the colder months. Fortunately, preserving has been honed to a science and raised to a fine art. In my family we used to do old-fashioned kettle canning every August. It was a hot, sweaty affair but the sheer pleasure of…

Keep Reading

Zahav: Michael Solomonov Presents the Diverse Flavors of Israel

in Non-Fiction by

When it comes to Israeli food, sublime is usually simple. Take Shakshouka for example. I first tasted Shakshouka one summer on a family vacation. My sister had invited her Israeli neighbors to join us and after a few days of our cooking, our guests said they wanted to cook us the quintessential Israeli dish. We had no idea what that might be. Our culinary heritage was limited to the Eastern European Jewish dishes we had grown up with such as chicken soup with matzo balls, and a few well-known Middle Eastern foods—chopped salad, falafel and hummus. We were surprised when the kitchen started releasing the fragrance of sautéing onions, garlic and peppers and they brought to the table a huge…

Keep Reading

Top 5 Reasons Why We Wish Empire’s Cookie Lyon was our Mom

in Fiction by

If you’re not watching Empire, get yourself over to FOX On Demand ASAP, because you’re seriously missing out. For the few people who have been living in caves, Empire is the beloved bedazzled primetime soap Dynasty (1981-1989) reimagined for the 21st century. (It’s probably no surprise that show creator Lee Daniels was a huge fan of Dynasty growing up.) Empire brings all the drama, conflict and bling, minus the shoulder pads and big hair, with an updated twist. This sudsy treat is about an African-American family who owns one of America’s biggest (fictional, of course) recording enterprises. During Season 1 Cookie Lyon (Taraji P. Henson) was released from prison, where she went to take the fall for her husband, hip-hop titan…

Keep Reading

James Patterson Wants You to Nominate an Indie Bookseller for a Holiday Bonus

in Potpourri by

Know an independent bookstore employee who could really use a holiday bonus? Santa, er, James Patterson is going to make sure that their hard work to help keep indie bookstores alive is rewarded. He’s donating $250,000 to indie booksellers by partnering with the American Booksellers Association to distribute the funds among as many of the 2,200 affiliated bookstores as possible. Why is he doing it? “Every holiday season I get the chance to pick out books to give my son, Jack,” says Patterson.  “I think hard about what he’ll love reading—what will excite him? What will inspire him? Of course, every day booksellers ask these questions on behalf of the people in their community. And I think they should be…

Keep Reading

Smart Reads: 3 Books for Banned Books Week

in Non-Fiction by

We’re closing out Banned Books Week (September 27-October 3) by honoring three of the most challenged and banned books in 2014 as this week’s Smart Reads. Even though our right to read anything we like is guaranteed by the First Amendment of the American Constitution, there have always been members of the community who take exception to the content of certain books. Reasons for banning books have varied. Most frequently cited are offensive language, sexually explicit content, violence, controversial issues (a highly subjective term) and being unsuitable for its targeted age group. But as any book loving parent knows, much of this depends on the individual reader. And what budding adolescent hasn’t read a forbidden adult novel under the covers…

Keep Reading

Exclusive! Lily & Val’s Valerie McKeehan Talks the Art of Chalk Lettering

in Potpourri by

The motto on Valerie McKeehan’s website, Lily & Val, says: “Hand-drawn lovelies” and indeed they are. Her gorgeous greeting cards, thank-you notes, posters, wrapping paper and other cheery and graceful designs use a medium familiar to anyone who went to school in the 20th century—chalk on a blackboard. But even my second-grade teacher’s impeccable cursive couldn’t hold a candle to the McKeehan’s lettering designs. Fortunately for us, she’s making it possible to get in on the fun with her new book, The Complete Book of Chalk Lettering: Create and Develop Your Own Style (Workman; September 22, 2015.) Before you declare your handwriting atrocious, McKeehan makes it easy for a beginner to learn the art of chalk board lettering. BookTrib recently…

Keep Reading

Review: Ruth Reichl Shares the Recipes that Saved Her Life in My Kitchen Year

in Non-Fiction by

What is it about Ruth Reichl that makes her feel like an old friend? If anyone else had lost what might have been the most amazing job in the world—editor-in-chief of Conde Nast’s Gourmet magazine—we might have greeted the announcement with a little schadenfreude. Really, who among us has a job that allows us to get into, and eat for free, in any restaurant in the world? Not to mention working with the most gifted chefs, designers, writers and photographers on one of the world’s great food publications. And winning six James Beard Awards. Who wants to hear some overly privileged person whine about losing that? As it turns out, I did. Because Reichl doesn’t whine, in fact the memoir…

Keep Reading

Smart Reads: 4 Books to Inspire Awe, Insight and Laughter

in Non-Fiction by

School is back in session and we’re craving the sort of books that fill us with awe and inspiration. As the days cool down we want to curl up with a steaming mug and a book that gives us a feast for thought. We’ve got four great books that are brimming with insight, humor and fresh ideas. Check out the grades next to each book to see how we rank our selections in this new column for nonfiction books called Smart Reads. The Road to Character by David Brooks (Random House, April 2015) “[The Road to Character is] a hyper-readable, lucid, often richly detailed human story. . . . In the age of the selfie, Brooks wishes to exhort us back to…

Keep Reading

Looking for Inspiration? Time to Conjure Up Elizabeth Gilbert’s Big Magic

in Non-Fiction by

After reading Elizabeth Gilbert’s new mind-shifting book on creativity and inspiration, forcing my offspring to listen to yet another revelation, and adding so many page flags that the book now looks like a mass of sticky notes, I was stumped about what to say. Ironic, no? Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear (Riverhead Books/Penguin; September 22, 2015) is all about the spark of inspiration with which we all struggle. Clearly I wasn’t sparking. As you know, ideas don’t always come when we need them. What’s that you say? You don’t think of yourself as creative? Gilbert says this is nonsense. All humans have the potential for creativity; we just have to open ourselves up to letting ideas come visit us.…

Keep Reading

Go to Top