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#reading

Anne Leigh Parrish: When You Have To Put Down The Book

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Like all serious writers, I’m a serious reader. My love of fiction came from the books I read when I was young. As I got older, my tastes evolved. When I began to write, I sounded a lot like my favorite authors, though in time I was able to distance myself from their voices and listen only to my own. I’ve learned quite a lot from other authors and read many books. However, I have also learned that sometimes, it’s okay to put down the book. Over the last year or two, I’ve made myself take time to read. I write all the time, and reading for its own sake fell by the wayside. I wanted to change that, get…

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What “Little Fires” Author Celeste Ng Is Reading Now

in Pop Culture by

Celeste Ng has always had a special place in our heart and bookshelves, with her latest novel Little Fires Everywhere cementing her place as one of the literary greats (good news: it’s also being turned into a miniseries by Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington). Because there’s no better book recommendation than one recommended by your favorite author, we’ve got access to the books Celest Ng is reading right now! Watch the video below to find out what’s on her bookshelf. While Little Fires Everywhere is the book that’s on everybody bedside table right now, her debut novel Everything I Never Told You beat both Stephen King and Dame Hilary Mantel to win the Amazon Book of the Year Award in 2014, and remains one of the best…

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Books are the New Superheroes: Reading is the Antidote to Holiday Stress

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Barnes and Noble recently did an independent survey on reading habits, and it turns out that the day before Thanksgiving is the busiest reading day of the year! Many of us leaf through the pages of our favorite novels over the Thanksgiving holiday season to relax. Reading also makes traveling better, with over 75% of the American population finishing one book, magazine, or other literary publication over the holiday travels. If you thought reading couldn’t possibly get any better after all that, the survey also revealed that one-in-four Americans will bring along a book to avoid awkward family situations. We’ve all been there (let’s be honest here, folks), but admittedly, bringing along a book for that exact purpose might be a new…

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Is Chat-Fiction the Next Big Thing in Publishing?

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If you’ve ever heard of chat fiction, chances are, you’ve got a teenager. Think about it like this: e-books were the new alternative to paperbacks, and chat fiction is the new alternative to e-books. Instead of just putting paperbacks into digital format, chat-fiction are stories, but told in text message format. The idea is that because the text format is more familiar to the teenagers and pre-teens of today who grew up texting, then having a book or a story in text message format will encourage them to read more – and surprisingly, it’s working. The original chat-fiction app was Hooked, available for $2.99 per week. The app launched in 2015, and has remained popular since, with an ever-growing fan…

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Picture This: Graphic Novels We Love from Every Genre

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. There’s something special about graphic novels. Maybe it’s the combination of art forms. Maybe it’s the unusual formatting. Maybe it’s the pops of color. Whatever it is, here at Bookish, we can’t get enough of it. That’s why we’re encouraging readers to pick up a graphic novel for this month’s reading challenge. No matter which genres speak to you, we’ve got picks for every kind of reader. Fiction             Nonfiction           Mystery & Thriller           Science Fiction & Fantasy             Romance       Young Adult             Middle Grade    …

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To Be a Kid Again: Your Favorite Childhood Stories Get a Reboot

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No matter our age, we can all remember those childhood books that touched and moved us. These are the stories we return to again and again, reveling in the tales that helped inform us as we grew. Personally, I remember devouring The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, and rereading Anne of Green Gables so many times that my paperback fell apart. Even as an adult, I would do anything to get more of those books, or any continuations of my favorite childhood stories. If I found out that there was a long-lost sequel to The Secret Garden, for example, I’m pretty sure I would squeal out loud (who cares if I’m in my 30s?). So when I realized that…

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Biloxi Blues: School District in Mississippi Bans ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’

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This past weekend, the film Marshall opened in theaters starring Chadwick Boseman. Marshall chronicles one case in the early career of former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.  The case, prior to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education case Marshall presented before the high court and won, saw him defending a black man (played by Emmy winner and breakout star of ‘This Is Us’, Sterling K. Brown) falsely accused of raping a white woman in Connecticut in 1940. Watching this little-known case in Marshall’s career play out on film, one cannot help but to recall how similar cases of false rape accusations of black men by white women have been portrayed in film (Rosewood comes to mind) and in literature. While rape…

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Author Fiona Davis Shares the Secrets to Her Writing Success

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Last year, author Fiona Davis published her wonderful debut, The Dollhouse, rich in history about the Barbizon Hotel in NYC. Keeping with iconic Manhattan landmarks, her fabulous new release, The Address is set in alternating timelines; in the late 1800s during the building of the Dakota, the architecturally stunning residence on the upper west side of Manhattan: Sara, a housekeeper at a fancy London hotel meets Theo, the talented NYC architect. He takes a job at the newly built Dakota, and craziness ensues. Their budding relationship remains hidden from his wife and children as they bond, it turns passionate and a crime is committed. In 1985, fresh out of rehab and penniless, designer Bailey, a descendant of the wealthy Dakota architect,…

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Bonding Over Books with Actress Sarah Jessica Parker

in Nonfiction by

The book world can be a kind and caring place. Authors are supportive to each other and many enjoy engaging with their readers. Book groups connect people to each other allowing them to discuss the stories authors write, current events and personal life. Books can bring people together from all over the world, highlighting issues, relationships and perspectives, binding us to each other. This appreciation of literature and the excitement over reading is what created an opportunity for me to spend some time bonding with Sarah Jessica Parker. I was thrilled to have the unique opportunity to discuss authors and books with her earlier this month and there was no shortage of words between us once we got down to…

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How Collective Readership Takes Us Deeper

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I’ve had a long history of questioning my true love for books ever since I had trouble enjoying the novels I was assigned in grade school. In fact, if I look at The Odyssey one more time, I’ll probably lose my mind. As someone who claimed to love books so much, I had to ask myself: ‘Why did I have such difficulty enjoying academically recommended books? Shouldn’t they appeal to the average bibliophile?’ It took me two years worth of college English classes to find my answer. This past semester, I took a class that felt like a weekly book club, except with college credit. Not only was I assigned to read books that have made it to my list…

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You Can’t Reboot a Book: The Beauty in Reading to Your Children

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It’s interactive, it will transport you from one time and world into the next, but most importantly, it builds lasting relationships. Today, getting children to focus is a challenge—there’s media everywhere. Lights, sounds, internet games; that’s enough to distract anybody, let alone a child who’s in the developing stages of life. We all know that children are sponges, but what is it that they are absorbing? Be it a cell phone, gaming console, or computer, the synergy is between the child and the machine. What is it that they are learning? Is this machine an extension of them? There are plenty of scifi novels and movies that tell us where that might get us. When you read a book to…

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Book Excerpt! Jessica Teich’s ‘The Future Tense of Joy’

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For a sneak peek of Jessica Teich’s memoir, The Future Tense of Joy, check out the excerpt below. INTRODUCTION Survivors remember the past in pieces. Not necessarily “before” and “after,” which would be easier. It’s more like time melts into Dali-like puddles, or convulses, slamming together faces and events. Psychologists often speak of a distortion in time afterward, as though the trauma occurred only moments before, but some- times the pain is so buried it ceases to exist. Then it springs up suddenly, like an allergy, even when it seems there’s no irritant. Or descends, like a fine but malevolent mesh. That was true for me, but I could never write about my experience as a “survivor.” Even the word seemed…

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So, You Want to be a Writer? Keep Reading!

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I’m sampling canapés at a party when someone walks up with a J.K. Rowling gleam in their eye. “I hear that you’re an editor. I have this great idea for a book, but I’m not sure how to get started. What do you recommend?” As I stifle the urge to fling the hummus in their general direction, I recommend those classics that I’ve long used for classes, writing workshops and myself: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction (Harper Perennial, 2006) by William Zinsser, Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott (Anchor, 1995), and Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within by Natalie Goldberg (Shambhala, 2005). For guys, I’ll usually toss in Stephen…

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