Author

Matt Gillick

Matt Gillick has 38 articles published.

Matt Gillick
Matt Gillick is from Northern Virginia but still says he’s from the South. Occasionally he writes something decent. He went to Providence College and is quite proud to have the creepiest mascot in college sports, go Friars.

Rion Amilcar Scott ‘Unapologetically’ Broaches Racism and Oppression in ‘Insurrections’

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Last night I was walking down Prospect St. in Stamford, Connecticut and I found myself trailing behind a black man wearing a black hoodie. My pace was significantly quicker than his. As I was about to turn to the front door of my apartment building, I was almost on the guy’s heels. I saw his shoulders tense up and he slowly turned around to look at me. I gave him a blinking nod. There was relief and frustration written all over his face. His eyes said, “Really? You got me all worked up like that for nothing.” He turned around as I pulled out my keys. I didn’t think much of this encounter until I realized that I was white…

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‘The Can Opener’s Daughter’ is Unlike Anything You Have Ever Read

in Fiction by
can opener's daughter review

It’s the most inventive graphic novel since Watchmen. Rob Davis’ The Can Opener’s Daughter disorients and intrigues, rolling itself into a pent-up coming of age thriller set in a dystopian landscape you’d find in a teenage schizophrenic’s fever dream. Let me clarify, I’m not saying this graphic novel is as good as Alan Moore’s superhero magnum opus. What I am saying is that there are few artists that have singlehandedly changed the game. Watchmen invoked that comic book heroes could have a deeply literary element. Rob Davis shows graphic novels can delve into a surrealistically absurd stratosphere that even sounds ridiculous for a comic book. His work has the potential to turn the genre on its head. Here’s the premise, the…

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Author and Thought Leader Nicolas Cole Talks about the Struggles of the Millennial Writer (Interview)

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Gone are the days when a writer can hide behind their work and live in a thatched roof cottage sipping a stiff glass of bourbon. Legendary authors like Thomas Pynchon who became just as famous for their literary work as for their notorious reclusiveness are a thing of the past. There hasn’t been a picture of the Inherent Vice author since the 1960s! We live in a new era where in order to stay relevant the writer AND their work needs to be front and center. Because let’s be honest, outside of the literary elites, do you even know who Pynchon and J.D. Salinger are? I spoke with Nicolas Cole, an entrepreneur and the author of Confessions of a Teenage…

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Author and Entrepreneur Peter Kozodoy Fills BookTrib in on Publishing’s Millennial-Driven Future

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Since Gutenberg’s printing press, the book world has been in constant flux. But never have we seen such a drastic change in platform, genre, subject matter, and style than we have these last 15 years. Instead of the paperback, you get the Kindle format. Or, instead of the tablet, you get the audio book. Millennials. We’re making everything go so fast. We want it now, all the time, every time. Now. Now. Now. So, how do books fit into this world when we all feel like we don’t have enough time to enjoy our coffee, let alone read a 300-page novel? According to entrepreneur Peter Kozodoy, the publishing industry is in a great position to move with the times precisely…

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Trailblazing Author Mike Bond Answers One Question about ‘Assassins’

in Thrillers by

Mike Bond writes with an urgency few other authors have been able to maintain. Mailer was able to do it to some degree. Tom Wolfe and Hunter Thompson had their ears to the ground. But Mike Bond has assumed this mantle for the 21st century. His writings have covered the most war-torn corners of the world to the familiar, rugged shores of Maine. Assassins (Mandevilla Press, December 8, 2016) covers a war that continues to define generations and it’s his most ambitious novel yet. With the Middle East being a melting pot of complicated strife, Bond maps a decades-long war through a military and cultural lens over several generations and characters. For our ‘One Question and Answer’ series I asked…

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Leon Wildes Answers One Question About ‘John Lennon vs. The U.S.A.’

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John Lennon was and continues to be an icon in music, counterculture, popular culture, fashion, and self-expression. But would you guess that he was also the face of the most high-profile deportation case in U.S. history? Yep, me neither. The Nixon administration hated the countercultural movement, or as WASPs called them: “hippies.” In Tricky Dick’s cloud of paranoia, he sought out anyone who could bring about an upheaval. John Lennon was foreign, anti-war, had a large platform with his music and wasn’t afraid to speak out. A dangerous combination. Nixon saw him as Public Enemy No. 1 and tried to kick him out of the country. Leon Wildes intimately knows the case because he was Lennon’s lawyer! Finally giving his…

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Review: ‘The Underground Railroad’ is the Best Book of the Year — Maybe the Decade

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Decades before the Civil War, a slave woman named Cora risks her life and runs off a cotton plantation in Georgia. Colson Whitehead’s hero in The Underground Railroad is afraid to take a gamble on so much until she realizes she wouldn’t be risking that much to begin with. Being a slave is not a life anyone would want to live; her livelihood is no livelihood at all. In bondage, Cora merely exists. She must take that ultimate risk: liberty or death. In his novel, Whitehead successfully gets to the heart of how slavery reduces a person to a point beyond recoverable humanity with this masterful, weaving tale of America’s nefarious past. Blending history with fictional innovation, Whitehead breathes life…

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Author Cate Holahan Answers One Question about ‘The Widower’s Wife’

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The opening lines to Cate Holahan’s The Widower’s Wife (Crooked Lane Books, August 9, 2016) solidified my perpetual refusal to go on a cruise ship. Her newest thriller follows the investigation of a young wife gone missing on a cruise and she just so happens to have a lofty inheritance. Ryan Monahan, a character I’m dying for Holahan to feature in future work, is on the case to find out what happened to Ana Bacon. Her follow-up to her debut novel, Dark Turns, took me on a weaving narrative to the aftermath and the events leading up to the mysterious woman’s disappearance. Perspective is reality, as the tired, ever-relevant saying goes. For the One Question and Answer series, I asked her about the…

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Author Imbolo Mbue Answers One Question about “Behold the Dreamers”

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The white picket fence with a rose garden out front; a four-bedroom home with 2.5 children and a quarter-acre backyard, including enough room for a swing and a grill; A stable job with a 20-minute commute into town and enough to pay off the mortgage. To many, this is the “American Dream.” To others, like myself, I think of the opening scene of David Lynch’s Blue Velvet. It might seem hunky-dory but there’s something festering and just not right underneath. I’m not knocking people if they have those aspirations — I’m simply saying they’re imperfect. Imbolo Mbue takes the nature of the American Dream to task in her debut novel, Behold the Dreamers (Random House, August 23 2016). Two families are…

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Here’s Why Edgar Allan Poe Still Matters

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Celebrating the death rather than the birthday of the master of the macabre, is only fitting. On this day October 7, 1849 Edgar Allan Poe died at the age of 40 after he was found in a gutter on a side street in Baltimore, Maryland. Some people say he died from an opium overdose, others say it was alcohol poisoning, some believe it was pneumonia, or murder? No one knows. The circumstances surrounding his death intensifies his mystique. It’s eerie and strangely perfect at the same time that a man famous for composing the scariest stories ever would die under a shadow of mystery and suspicion. I had the fortune of being introduced to Poe when, at 9 years old, I…

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If You’re Going to Desert Trip, You Want to Read Chris Formant’s ‘Bright Midnight’

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Author Chris Formant has a crazy theory: what if the 27 Club’s Brian Jones, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Ron “Pigpen” McKernan and Jim Morrison were all murdered? His upcoming novel, Bright Midnight (Highline Editions, November 9, 2016) takes readers on a journey with an aging rock journalist coming across explosive evidence behind the truth of the Myth of 27. His book transports us to a period in time saturated in mystery and modern American mythology. Much of the mystique of the wandering troubadour lives on in the souls of today’s aged rockers. Rock ‘n’ roll music has changed drastically with the emergence of punk, grunge, emo and alternative. Millennials like myself remember the days listening to the biggest hits of the…

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MTV Suspect’s iO Tillett Wright Answers One Question about ‘Darling Days’

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The crap we go through while establishing our identity (shakes head back and forth). We often face ridicule for being different or criticized for being too much like Joe Shmoe walking down Park Avenue. You can’t win. Oftentimes people assimilate to the status quo or to what society labels as “normal.” Yeah, these people might lead fulfilling lives but do they change the trajectory of history? No, because never has an average person with average ideas and average goals ever changed the world. Nonconformists move society forward, or at least lead it down a different path. Activist, actor, writer, poet and MTV host iO Tillett Wright is one of those nonconformists. Wright’s debut memoir, Darling Days (Ecco Press, September 27, 2016) chronicles his…

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The Books Are Better: ‘Snowden’ is a Failure, at Least by Oliver Stone’s Standards

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Who would have thought that Oliver Stone would play it safe? I certainly wouldn’t think the JFK and Platoon helmsman would decide to pull back when exploring one of the most important stories of the early 21st century regarding our privacy. But I’m here to tell you, Stone played it too close to the vest. Snowden stars the multifaceted Joseph Gordon-Levitt as the titular Edward Snowden, who at his personal expense exposed how the National Security Agency is able to spy on anyone with a cell phone or internet connection. Many historians think this revelation was more impactful than Daniel Ellsburg’s ‘Pentagon Papers’ revealing the impending failure of the Vietnam War. The movie is based on two books, The Snowden Files (Vintage, 2014) by…

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Comedian Amber Tozer Answers One Question about Her Memoir ‘Sober Stick Figure’

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Truman Capote once said about drinking, “I drink because it’s the only time I can stand it!” Along with being a quick-witted sassafras and a fabulously talented writer, Capote was a notorious alcoholic. Drinking stifled his creativity and eventually contributed to his death at the age of 59. In the beginning, drinking can open windows of thought and possibility, but too often people rely on it to get them through the day, i.e. Ernest Hemingway, Jack Kerouac, Patricia Highsmith, Tennessee Williams, need I go on? Stand-up comedian Amber Tozer gives us her story about a life-long affinity for alcohol in the sharply honest memoir Sober Stick Figure (Running Press, May 31, 2016). Having been an alcoholic since her teenage years (but…

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Welcome Back: Already Stressed from School? Read More!

in Potpourri by

Move-in day, back-to-school day, whatever you call it, people are going back to class. That essentially means: books on books on books. Regardless of the subject or your major, you’ll be assigned to read 45 books for four courses within the first two weeks (we’re thinking this number is basically accurate!). The horror, the horror. Stressful times like these are perfect opportunities for us to read more. Yes, you read that correctly. ‘Now wait just a second, Matt,’ is probably what you’re saying to yourself, ‘I’m knee deep in schoolwork. There’s just no way I’ll have time to read anything else.’ Well, hypothetical person, hear me out on this. Let me tell you about some of the benefits: You’ll be reading something…

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Author Adam Ehrlich Sachs Answers One Question About ‘Inherited Disorders’

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Rarely do writers compose a great piece by sitting down and just doing it. Countless hours of thought and uncertainty go into writing a poem, story or novel before typing a single word. Writers are often inspired to create something but many just don’t know where to start. Our most recent addition to the One Question and Answer series features Adam Ehrlich Sachs’ Inherited Disorders: Stories, Parables, & Problems (Regan Arts, May 3, 2016). Written in over 100 vignettes this short, short story collection spans over thousands of years exploring the often absurd dynamic between fathers and sons. So, that begs the question of how Sachs came to write so extensively on this subject. Question: What did you find so fascinating…

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