Author

Matt Gillick - page 2

Matt Gillick has 38 articles published.

Matt Gillick is from Northern Virginia but still says he’s from the South. Occasionally he writes something decent. He went to Providence College and is quite proud to have the creepiest mascot in college sports, go Friars.

Author Paul Lisicky Answers One Question about ‘The Narrow Door’

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You are your own worst critic, but friends can be a close second. They know you better than most, aside from parents but even that can be up for debate. Going through a particularly rough time as a post-grad living in a new city where I know practically no one, I picked up Paul Lisicky’s The Narrow Door (Graywolf Press, January 19, 2016), a memoir about two relationships: one romantic, the other platonic. Lisicky weaves the narratives of life as a writer alongside his good friend and colleague Denise Gess and his troubled relationship with his ex-husband, poet Mark Doty. I highly recommend this fabulous book that so genuinely depicts the trials and selfish tribulations friendships evoke in us. Given…

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Visiting 3 of the Best Breweries in the U.S. and 2 Books To Get You Prepped

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“Good people drink good beer.” Hunter S. Thompson said that and while I agree with him I’m not at all opposed to a cool Pabst Blue Ribbon. So I guess in Dr. Gonzo’s eyes I’m the scum of the earth. But I also like IPAs which doesn’t bode well for me either seeing as some scientists would say I’m a psychopath. What do I do? Who the hell am I? Before going further down the rabbit hole of my drinking habits and existential paradox, let’s take a look at what I believe to be the three best breweries in the good ol’ U.S., baby! Devil’s Backbone Brewing Co. (Roseland, Virginia) The newest but also one of the best. Located in the…

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Review of ‘Harry Potter and the Cursed Child’: Does J.K. Rowling Break New Ground?

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Well, here we are. The “last” tale of the Harry Potter saga from J.K. Rowling and this time it hits the stage on London’s West End. Harry Potter and The Cursed Child (Arthur A. Levine Books, July 31, 2016) penned by Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany, continues the story of The Boy Who Lived and his friends now all grown up, approaching middle age with more adventures awaiting them, and their children. With Cursed Child being the first of the Potter series to break from the novel structure, I was interested to see how the Wizarding World would translate to the stage. But I guess I’m going to have to stay interested for a while because there’s just no way I can afford…

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Grilling 101: Sizzling Books For Your Next Barbecue

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Burgers sizzling on the grill. Close your eyes. Can you hear it? There isn’t a more satisfying, salivating sound in the world. Unless you’re a vegetarian and then it’s the worst thing that ever happened, ever. Burgers, hot dogs, steaks, brisket, spare ribs, baby back ribs, someone please stop me (clearly I am not said vegetarian). Barbecues and block parties are times that we can indulge. Every guy thinks they’re the guru of the grill like some Jedi master. Usually this so-called expertise ends up with overcooked burgers and steaks so underdone they look like they should still be grazing in the fields. I am guilty of this sin thanks to the time I tried tackling a big rack of…

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The Joy of the Food Truck: Books about the Best Traveling Restaurants

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Saturday night in Stamford, Connecticut. I had just walked out of Tiernan’s Pub with a sunny disposition at one in the morning. People from all over converged on Columbus Park to hear some independent boy band tear up the small stage. The bar scene was packed and uncomfortable after a while. I wanted to go back to my apartment and have a late-night snack that I’d regret in the morning. But then three horrible truths dawned on me: I can’t cook, I don’t have any food to cook with, and I only have five bucks. As I walked up Broad Street I lamented how I’d have no food. My morning was going to be a rough one. Oh woe is…

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A Summer Book List to Get You Excited for Exploring the Outdoors

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I know it’s July and it’s hot as blazes. Many of us just want to sit next to our cool, life-saving window unit, letting the days pass us by. But, come on. Just look outside. There’s a whole world to explore out there! Do you think Lewis and Clark let a little heat hinder their trek across the American West? You’re damn right, it didn’t. Summer really is the best season for going on outings and adventures. So get off your love seat, grab a Camelback, and go hiking/camping/skydiving — whatever makes you happy. And to get you in the mood, here are four books to give you that little extra push: Into the Wild by John Krakauer (Anchor Books, January…

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BookTrib’s Music Festival Survival Guide: Tips and Books to Get You Ready

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I recently went to the Firefly Music Festival in late June. Just to give you a taste and, I guess, a microcosm of the whole epic experience: it involved me throwing glow sticks into a crowd of 80,000 people and riding a large flamingo pool floatie while Blink-182 played ‘Dammit.’ Summer means it’s music festival season. They can be some of the wildest times of your life and you get to see great performances by incredible artists. What’s not to love? While I don’t have any regrets from the weekend, I feel I could have prepared a little better. Here are some essential tips for having an amazing time at your next music festival along with three books to get you ready:…

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Book Romances That Would be Your Perfect Summer Fling!

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Summer is officially here! Teens and college students are home from school and they’re looking for fun and exciting things to spend their time doing every day. Some will go on road trips, others will most definitely go to the beach, while some will certainly fall in love. Ahh, summer flings. So, you’ve just bumped into someone who’s home for a few months and you start thinking they’re pretty cute and totally your type. You both make some memories that you’ll hold dear forever, even if you go your separate ways come September. Then it’s back to reality. There’s nothing wrong with that at all. But if you’re looking to make that summer fling as memorable as you can, you’ll want to take some…

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Author Yann Martel Answers One Question about ‘The High Mountains of Portugal’

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When you have the opportunity to ask one question to the Man Booker Prize-winning and international bestselling author of Life of Pi, Yann Martel, you better be damn sure it isn’t a stupid one. Martel’s The High Mountains of Portugal (Random House, 2016) follows three men in three different time periods who experience the profound loss of a loved one. They explore a myriad of subject matter pertinent to and beyond their respective eras searching for comfort like philosophy and religion. Based on all of this I think I found my question for this latest installment of our ‘One Question and Answer’ series. Here’s what Martel had to say: Question: You cover a wide range of topics in The High Mountains of Portugal, not…

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Independent Bookstores You Need to Visit on a Summer Getaway

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In a country of big corporations and homogenized megastores, the little shop down the street has become all too rare. Everywhere I go I try to find that bookstore where I can have my own little keepsake; My own memory of the places I’ve been to. Since Memorial Day Weekend is upon us, here are five independent bookstores that you should visit on a long weekend (like this one) or on a summer getaway. Mermaid Books: Williamsburg, VA On a Saturday morning after having a much needed breakfast by the William and Mary campus, I came across Mermaid Books. Resting below a flight of stairs leading to a basement, this little store sells all kinds of vintage used books. In a…

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PODCAST: Authors Marguerite Elisofon and Ann Martin Talk ‘Rain Reign’ and Autism Awareness

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Author of the memoir My Picture Perfect Family (Central Park Publishers, 2016) Marguerite Elisofon chronicles the true story of raising twins in New York City and the journey that takes place following their daughter’s diagnoses on the Autism Spectrum. She sat down in with novelist Ann Martin to talk about her book Rain Reign (ALA Notable Children’s Books, 2014), in which the story is narrated by a young girl on the spectrum.   About the Authors About Marguerite Elisofon: Marguerite Elisofon is a New York City writer and the author of My Picture Perfect Family, a memoir about how her family navigated life with a child on the autistic spectrum before the internet and support groups existed. She also blogs about parenting young adults and disability…

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From Comic Book to Small Screen: Is AMC’s Preacher the Next The Walking Dead?

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Blood, gore, conspiracy, apocalypse, and…God’s missing? In case you haven’t been on the internet in the past few months, AMC’s summer headliner Preacher premieres on Sunday, May 22 at 10 p.m. EST. The show will be based on the beloved comic book series created by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon. It ran from 1995-2000 and is credited for reinvigorating the comic book genre when sales were at an all-time low. (All issues are now available in trades as graphic novels.) Preacher stars Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter’s Dominic Cooper playing the disillusioned minister Jesse Custer with Ruth Negga as his ex-girlfriend turned hit woman, Tulip O’Hare. Comic book fans fondly remember the series for its excessive violence and profanity while also being a hilariously smart…

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Author Colin Atrophy Hagendorf Answers One Question about ‘Slice Harvester’

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Food has the power to save us or kill us. Chicken salad or fried chicken? Sliced apples or French fries? Yes, we should be eating healthy and live omnivore lifestyles with walnuts, granola and grapefruit but, dammit, if I want a bacon-wrapped grilled cheese meatball sandwich I’m going to have it. Whatever your nutritional values, food invokes our communal nature to come together as people with a common goal: getting a great meal. Fellow food lover Colin Atrophy Hagendorf took his infatuation for pizza and made it the centerpiece for his memoir, Slice Harvester: A Memoir in Pizza. While chronicling his life as a self-proclaimed punk wandering around New York City, Hagendorf sets out to have himself a slice at every…

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Author Sara Nović Answers One Question about ‘Girl at War’

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Hearing about the Syrian refugee crisis is unavoidable. It has become a part of our dialogue. You can’t change the channel or scroll away from one story on the heartbreak and prejudice refugees face without running into another. Once in a while, kindness does shine through in rough times like these–the Pope just took 12 Muslim Syrian refugees back to Rome with him. But what may be most important to note, is this may be a new crisis, but it is following a familiar pattern. People have been displaced and scattered through war and genocide for centuries. Media outlets just have a short memory. The same horrors occurred for the Croatians in the 1990s. Author Sara Nović covers that seemingly forgotten time in…

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An April Showers Playlist to Brighten Your Day!

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You’re sitting by the window in your living room and it’s raining outside. Such a bummer. You had all of these plans to fix up the yard, clean the gutters, maybe go for a jog, but now you’re stuck inside. The only good thing? You have an excuse to get started on that novel your friend lent you or a book you got for Christmas six years ago. Spring showers really are the perfect reading days and to make that experience even more enjoyable, here’s our April playlist. It has a little bit of everything. From epic slow jams such as Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On” to modern classics like Pentatonix’s “Can’t Sleep Love,” our April playlist will help you…

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Author Emily Schultz Answers One Question about ‘The Blondes’

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It’s a beautiful spring day in the city as people stroll through the parks. Families are buying fresh greens from the farmer’s market, workers are hustling up and down Main St. to get to work. All seems well and good, until every blonde woman becomes a homicidal maniac. No, seriously. Emily Schultz uses allegorical horror and dark humor to show that nothing is really as it seems in her novel, The Blondes (Picador, paperback, April 12). Named one of NPR’s Best Books of 2015, Schultz comments on social constructs placed on women, like the need to be attractive and docile to male counterparts. Because her novel has such a wild and disturbing premise, we asked Schultz where she thinks horror fits into popular culture. Here’s her thoughts: Question: While The…

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