Tag archive

Parenting

Baby Teeth Proves It’s Dangerous to Play Favorites

in Thrillers by

If you are in need of a blood chilling thriller to make your heart pound, Baby Teeth (St. Martin’s Press) is for you!  It is clear that author Zoje Stage mastered everything dark and suspenseful when she created Hanna, a seven year old, and the only child of Suzette and Alex.  Suzette had a difficult childhood, poor mothering and a continual battle with Crones Disease. When she meets Alex in a professional environment, he saves her from loneliness and despair by respecting her design work and falling in love.  Alex, an architect, is a cheery Swedish man who desperately loves his wife, Suzette, and showers his very bright but mute daughter Hanna with love and attention.  Both parents want to be…

Keep Reading

BookTrib Exclusive: ‘All the Glittering Prizes’ by Pia de Jong

in Non-Fiction by

BookTrib.com is happy to welcome Pia de Jong, prize-winning Dutch literary novelist and newspaper columnist. Pia moved to Princeton, NJ in 2012 from Amsterdam.  Her memoir, Saving Charlotte: A Mother and the Power of Intuition, is her first book in English.  We hope you will find Pia’s stories as delightfully charming as we do. All the Glittering Prizes When I walk into my son’s room one afternoon at 5 p.m., his friend Justin is sprawled fast asleep on the bed, still wearing his shoes and coat. “He came to do his homework,” he explains, “but before he put down his bag he collapsed.” “What happens now?” I ask. “Let him sleep,” my daughter says. “Do not wake him up. He is…

Keep Reading

Pauline Lévêque and Florence Mars: The Culture of Raising Children

in Non-Fiction by

If you lived abroad for an extended period, even simply during a semester off while in college, you know that cultures are nothing alike. There is as much in common between Russian and Portuguese bread than between a whale and a tiger. That is what gives the world its colors and texture. There has been a bevy of books about raising children in foreign countries of late. France and Paris seem to be the major targets of this topic. A mother forced to live abroad because her husband’s multi-national has relocated the family to a distant land or simply a single mom in search of new adventures learn quickly that, in France, things are not quite the same as in…

Keep Reading

Parenting is Tough: ‘Listen’ Helps Build a Roadmap to a Happier, Healthier Family

in Non-Fiction by

Any parent will tell you, raising children is a lot of work and one of the most challenging jobs anyone could take on in life. The rewards, of course, highly outweigh the tough times, but it’s just not easy. That’s why there are books upon books dedicated to helping you raise your child(ren). Some are better than others, some are more effective for different types of families; it’s really all about what works for you and what doesn’t because every child is different. Enter Patty Wipfler and Tosha Schore, M.A., the authors of Listen: Five Simple Tools to Meet Your Everyday Parenting Challenges (Hand in Hand Parenting, August 23, 2016). Wipfler and Schore set up a fool-proof way to help…

Keep Reading

Video: Interview with Marguerite Elisofon and My Picture Perfect Family: What Happens When One Twin Has Autism

in Non-Fiction by

On December 26th, 1990 Marguerite Elisofon gave birth to premature twins: Samantha and Matthew. Marguerite and her husband soon noticed their daughter lagged behind her brother in ways that scared them. Samantha, they learned, was on the autistic spectrum. Most “experts” weren’t optimistic about her chances for leading a normal life and prepared the Elisofons for the worst. But Marguerite and her family refused to accept these limitations. Twenty-three challenging years later, Samantha graduated from Pace University . . . cum laude! In My Picture Perfect Family, Marguerite tells her family’s courageous story. At the end of the twentieth century, when the current supports for children on the autistic spectrum did not exist, Marguerite and her family pioneered their own…

Keep Reading

Video: Missed It? Watch Interview with Carolyn Carpeneti and Taking Flight: Mastering Executive Function

in Non-Fiction by

What should we do when our children struggle academically? Should we let them fail so they’ll learn from their mistakes and do better next time? Perhaps. But what if they lack the organizational tools to succeed? Carolyn Carpeneti’s son had effectively coped with learning differences through high school and was accepted into the university of his dreams. Only weeks into his freshman year, Carpeneti was stunned to discover that her son was flunking. The problem, it turned out, was not lack of intelligence, interest, or motivation but weak executive function—the ability to plan, organize, manage time, initiate action, and achieve goals, a skill set that often does not develop in the human brain until the late teens and midtwenties. Executive…

Keep Reading

Video: Missed It? Live Interview with Jeffrey Selingo and There is Life After College

in Non-Fiction by

From the bestselling author of College Unbound comes a hopeful, inspiring blueprint to help alleviate parents’ anxiety and prepare their college-educated child to successfully land a good job after graduation. Saddled with thousands of dollars of debt, today’s college students are graduating into an uncertain job market that is leaving them financially dependent on their parents for years to come—a reality that has left moms and dads wondering: What did I pay all that money for? There Is Life After College offers students, parents, and even recent graduates the practical advice and insight they need to jumpstart their careers. Education expert Jeffrey Selingo answers key questions—Why is the transition to post-college life so difficult for many recent graduates? How can…

Keep Reading

Video: Missed It? Interview with Rupert Isaacson and The Long Ride Home

in Non-Fiction by

When his son Rowan was diagnosed with autism, Rupert Isaacson feared they might never communicate. But when he discovered Rowan responded to horses, they traveled to Mongolia–the spiritual home of the horse–where shaman banished the tantrums, the incontinence, and the hopeless isolation. A year later, Rowan started regressing. Only then did Rupert remember the shaman had told him that they must make three more healing journeys. So they went: to the Bushmen of Namibia and Australia’s coastal rainforests, and to America’s Navajo reservation, discovering new ways of connecting with autistic children using nature, movement, and animals, unlocking children from their most severe symptoms and developing two internationally known programs: Horse Boy Method and Movement Method. The Long Ride Home is…

Keep Reading

5 Best Word Games for Vacation Family Fun

in Potpourri by

My family is a Scrabble family. Every holiday or vacation, we bust out our board, extra trays, and our battered Scrabble dictionaries. We know how to stack words like pros, we have strange rules we’ve adapted over the years, and at least one person uses all of their letters per game. There are no “cats” in our games – try “qat.” Or “oi.” Or “aa.” Scrabble and other word games have become honored parts of our family vacations. Rarely do we just sit on the beach and relax—going to the lake is really just an excuse to play a word game in the sunshine. So for the rest of you linguistically inclined families, here are five of the best to…

Keep Reading

Dwayne Johnson rocks it in San Andreas

in Fiction by

I can tell you from personal experience that the bond between a father and daughter is unique, profound and indelible. Is it strong enough to make a father miss the big game in order to attend a dance recital? Yes. Will it convince a father to wear a frilly pink hat and take part in a tea party with a bunch of stuffed animals? Sure. But the real question is this: will it send a dad across the length and breadth of a fiery landscape riddled with collapsing buildings, shattered highways and shifting tectonic plates in order to save his little girl? You’re damn right it will. That unbreakable bond between dad and daughter lies at the heart of San…

Keep Reading

9 Ways parents can connect with their “iTeen”

in Non-Fiction by

How does a parent stay emotionally connected to the plugged-in teen? The authors of How to Connect With Your iTeen: A Parenting Roadmap  by Susan Morris Shaffer and Linda Perlman Gordon have the answer. How we define connection with our children has changed because of social media. This is particularly true for teens. Social media is how teens relate to their world and each other. However, some needs don’t change. Connection and understanding the world our teens live in can create a secure attachment for them and is beneficial to developing satisfying relationships. Communication with boys and girls may be different but the need for connection remains the same. 1. Tolerate your teen’s sadness and frustration. Listen to your teen’s…

Keep Reading

On Mother’s Day, two moms can be better than one

in Non-Fiction by

Mother’s Day is here and we need to remember that some individuals in fact have two mothers. Many still contest the idea and claim that young children may be confused. However, there are plenty of positive ways to celebrate Mother’s Day if a lesbian couple is involved; just ask Susan Smith Kuczmarski, Ed.D, a professor at Northwestern University and Loyola University Chicago. An award-winning author of five books, including the recently released Becoming A Happy Family: Pathways to the Family Soul, Kuczmarksi has also appeared on the Today Show, and is considered a leading expert on “issues devoted to the contemporary family.” What kinds of special challenges do two moms face on a daily basis? We all share in the…

Keep Reading

Kid won’t eat veggies? Sneak in the greens with soup

in Non-Fiction by

When it comes to eating, children usually fit two types: one, the free-wheeling, adventurous type who will eat anything, including stuff that may or may not even be intended for human consumption. And two, the kind who won’t eat anything that isn’t covered with fake cheese and doesn’t come in the shape of a cartoon character (just how many shapes can macaroni and cheese take, anyway?). And if you’re like me, you get lucky (SARCASM ALARM BLARING), and you get one of each. It isn’t that I don’t love both my kids, and it’s not that I don’t love the adventure of raising each of them (because I do). The most frustrating time, though, is around mid-afternoon, when I’m trapped…

Keep Reading

Oscar’s Best Animated Motion Pictures — and one that was overlooked

in Potpourri by

We here at BookTrib are huge fans of Designer Daddy (a.k.a. Brent Almond) who graces our site with his knowledge of popular culture and blogs about (among other things) his preschooler, superheroes and the adventures of parenting. One of the pleasures of Brett’s work is his “Super Lunch Notes,” the colorful and wonderfully geeky slips of paper he sneaks into his kid’s lunch before he heads off to school. And these notes aren’t just “Have a nice day,” or “I’m so proud of you!” These are notes full of fun, flair and all the magic today’s magical pop culture renaissance. Recently, Almond was kind enough to share with us some of his latest Super Lunch Notes, which are based on…

Keep Reading

Haul-a-Day 24: Better Parenting

in Potpourri by

Many a parent has lamented the lack of a user’s manual — your children are born and all you have to go on is instinct and the desire to do better, or at least as well, as your own parents did. And while the number of dirty diapers that need changing decreases as your children get older, the complexity of the problems with which you have to deal only increases. Here, for those stressed out parents out there, are five books that come as close to users’ manuals as you are going to find. A picture book that illustrates just how frustrating being a parent can be. Here’s an author who feels your parental pain Ever feel like your teenager…

Keep Reading

Hickory Daiquiri Dock: A toast to parenting

in Non-Fiction by

After a long day of playgrounds, finger painting, diapers and a couple of rounds of the world’s favorite backseat games of “But Why?” and “Stop Touching Me!” anyone who has had the joy of being a new parent (or babysitter) can understand the allure of Mother’s Little Helper. (If you do not know what that is or never felt the compulsion to imbibe, please do not tell me. Just let me sip the tea of old age and poor child-rearing skills.) Since Valium seems to have fallen out of favor, Tim Federle’s Hickory Daiquiri Dock: Cocktails with a Nursery Rhyme Twist (Running Press, $15.00) gives parents and parent sympathizers a 21st-century alternative. Disguised cleverly as a picture board book, Hickory…

Keep Reading

Go to Top