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New York City

“Queen of Kenosha:” A Guitar-Playing, Nazi-Busting Heroine

in Pop Culture by

October is Graphic Novel Writing Month, and to celebrate, why not try reading a gem from this genre? Queen of Kenosha, (Animal Media Group) written by Howard Shapiro and illustrated by Erica Chan, is a vibrant tale featuring a heroine who is passionate about the work she does, both in the music industry and as a secret operative.  Want more BookTrib? Sign up NOW for news and giveaways! It’s 1963 New York City, and Nina Overstreet is anything but your typical recruit for an undercover mission to bring Nazis down. Primarily a singer trying to make it big with a record company with the help of her close friend and agent Christina, Nina also lends a hand at a karate class to make…

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“The Lost Family” Covers Marriage and Love Post-WWII

in Fiction by

Jenna Blum, author of the bestseller Those Who Save Us, is back with another novel, one that is equally heartbreaking and haunting. Covering topics of grief and love, Blum artfully and skillfully reminds us that the past never seems to stay there, and that the repercussions can still be felt decades and generations later. The Lost Family begins in 1965 Manhattan. World War II may be over, but the memories are always present for Peter Rashkin, who survived Auschwitz, but lost his wife and daughters. Now, trying to make a new life for himself, he becomes the owner and head chef of a restaurant called Masha, a namesake to his lost wife. People from all over come to eat and savor the…

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Why David Duchovny and I Should Be Friends

in Fiction by

I started out being really pissed at David Duchovny. On January 3, 2017, my agent sent the manuscript of my third novel, entitled Miss Subways, out on submission to publishers. On January 9, 2017, the “Publishers Marketplace Daily Deals” e-newsletter announced that David Duchovny’s novel, entitled Miss Subways, had been sold to Farrar, Straus and Giroux for publication in Spring 2018. Come again? I sent an email to my agent asking her if this title hiccup would be a problem. Meanwhile, I swore under my breath at Duchovny for stealing my title, which I realized I wouldn’t get to use despite the fact that my novel was about the historic Miss Subways contest and his wasn’t; it was a supernatural novel, for goodness sake. My agent reassured…

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Tara Isabella Burton’s Debut and Deadly Relationships

in Thrillers by

This year, we’ve seen a lot of books that seem to just raise the bar on what we can expect from literature in terms of mesmerizing plots, spellbinding characters and twists no one ever saw coming. But debut novel Social Creature, with its eye-catching cover that stops you in your tracks may just have raised the bar above all the others. Equally hypnotic and provocative, the novel focuses on the friendship between two women: Louise living on her own, barely making rent with no real relationships with anyone, not even her own family; and Lavinia, living in an apartment on the Upper East Side, funded by her parents, and taking part in everything the high life in New York has to offer.…

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Socialite Wannabe in Amber Brock’s “Lady Be Good”

in Fiction by

In 1924, George and Ira Gershwin wrote one of their most famous songs: I am so awf’ly misunderstood So, lady be good to me. . . The heroine of Amber Brock’s Lady Be Good is indeed a misunderstood young woman, tormented by desires both frivolous and serious. Beautiful and wealthy, the only daughter of a hotelier whose money is unacceptably nouveau, Kitty Tessler devotes much of her time to figuring out how to be welcomed into New York City’s Knickerbocker crowd. Her friendship with a former schoolmate Henrietta (“Hen”) Bancroft, whose patrician family is listed in the social register, has not yielded the entrée she craves. It is 1953 and American culture and society have been upended in the postwar…

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On Murder, the Gilded Age and Crime of the Century

in Non-Fiction by

It was the original crime of the century. On June 25th, 1906, a shot rang out in Madison Square Garden, leaving of one of the greatest architects and most famous of New York’s socialites dead. Stanford White, who designed New York’s Washington Square Arch, Madison Square Garden and the Rosecliff Mansion, was murdered by millionaire Harry Thaw as hundreds of people watched in horror. Years before his murder, White had fallen in love with a young actress named Evelyn Nesbit, who seemed to return his attentions. But White had two sides to him and one night, he assaulted Nesbit horribly. Despite the attack, Evelyn Nesbit remained committed to White, falling even more deeply in in love with him – even after…

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Review: ‘The Waters & The Wild’ is a Stunning Exploration of Human Character

in Fiction by

Daniel Abend lives a comfortable life as a successful psychotherapist on the Upper West Side of New York City. He is a single father raising a teenage daughter. When one of his patients commits suicide Daniel receives a note that has him start to ask questions about his patient’s death. Provided with a mysterious set of clues in the form of an old key, a haunting photograph and a veiled poem, Daniel is left struggling to solve the mystery before him. But suddenly, his daughter disappears. In a desperate search for his daughter and the truth, Daniel finds himself swept back to when he was a young man living in Paris. As each day passes, the trail gets colder and…

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Happening This Week: Best, Must-Attend Literary Events In and Around New York City

in Potpourri by

If you were on the east coast this weekend, storms, heavy winds, down trees and power outages kept many of us indoors.  As book lovers, we really don’t mind because it just gives us a chance to pick up that new Spring read we’ve been meaning to get to or return to one of our favorite classics. But, that was last week. This week, we’re getting out of the house and so should you! If you are in or around New York City, here are some of he best literary events happening this week in the Big Apple: Monday, March 5, 2018: Bard College Professor and bestselling author Daniel Mendelsohn will be reading from his new memoir, An Odyssey: A Father, a Son, and an…

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‘Laura Meets Jeffrey’: An X-Rated ‘Literary’ Love Story

in Non-Fiction by

James Wolcott in “Vanity Fair”: “Jeffrey Michelson’s reflections on fighting and fucking are like a bolt of bourbon, a careening chronicle of orgies, S&M, hanging and banging with the stars, and related calisthenics.” Anka Radakovich in “British GQ”: “Laura Meets Jeffrey” is a fascinating nonfiction “erotic memoir.” Jeffrey Michelson chronicles the wildest, most intense sexual scene in New York City’s history. This book is raunchy, dirty and disgusting. I couldn’t put it down.” Norman Mailer from his foreword: “Objective, funny, salacious, and perversely—dare I say it—uplifting!” For Valentine’s Day, I offer you “Laura Meets Jeffrey,” a hot, wild, real-life memoir. I do so, however, with a warning. Reviewers have called it “undeniably brilliant” and Norman Mailer called it “literature,” but this…

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Layered with Sex, Lies and Glamour, ‘She Regrets Nothing’ is Utterly Captivating

in Fiction by

Rarely do we find a book that boasts of intrigue and mystery that’s as sly as it is sexy and just plain fun; but author Andrea Dunlop is a rare talent. Dunlop’s latest novel, She Regrets Nothing: A Novel is a multi-layered story where the themes of power, sex and glamour make this novel so utterly captivating. Our protagonist, Laila Lawrence, is made an orphan at age 23, following the death of her mother. Raised in Grosse Point, Michigan, Laila’s quiet, settled life takes a sharp turn with the unexpected arrival of her three wealthy and glamorous cousins from Manhattan for her mother’s funeral. Laila’s cousins are part of the family that her father had once belonged to and become estranged…

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Mikkel Rosengaard’s Debut, ‘The Invention of Ana’ is a Surreal Reinvention of Classic Literary Fiction

in Fiction by

Having spent the majority of his writing carer focusing on short stories and non-fiction pieces, Mikkel Rosengaard is finally making the jump from writer to novelist. His debut work, The Invention of Ana, is a uniquely stunning novel with a surreal dreamlike quality— reminiscent of a distant memory that only adds to the reader’s enjoyment of this work. On a Brooklyn rooftop in spring, our narrator, freshly arrived from Copenhagen and working as an art intern who wants to be a writer, meets Ana Ivan.  Ana is a mathematician and artist who is as intriguing and fierce as she is independent, but, as Ana confesses, she’s also bad luck— she comes from a cursed Romanian lineage. Soon the intern finds himself enthralled…

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Elegant and Poetic, Carrie La Seur’s ‘The Weight of an Infinite Sky’ Draws Inspiration from Shakespeare

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The second novel from environmental lawyer Carrie La Seur, The Weight of an Infinite Sky is a stunning story about family, murder, betrayal, and love, drawing in elements of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Set in the unforgiving, open land of Montana, La Seur easily captures the essence of the West in her writing, making each reader feel the soul of the Montana earth around them. Elegant, poignant, and poetic, The Weight of an Infinite Sky is a beautiful addition to La Seur’s works. Anthony Fry rebelled against the family expectations that, as the only son, he would take over the cattle ranch from his father; a business that had been in the family for generations. Instead, Anthony dreamt of leaving Montana for the city, hoping for…

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BookTrib Q&A: Andrea Dunlop ‘Regrets Nothing’ about Her Love of The Big Apple

in Fiction by

In 2017, books with a strong female protagonists were super popular: Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl and Liv Constantine’s The Last Mrs. Parrish are just two of the books that had everyone in love with a strong female lead last year. This year, we are about to see another wave of bold women in literature and one of those will come from Andrea Dunlop, author of Losing the Light: A Novel, and the novella Broken Bay. She Regrets Nothing: A Novel, is Dunlop’s latest work that combines complex characters, intrigue and the lights and sounds of the Big Apple. Leila Lawrence from the quiet town of Grosse Point, Michigan, becomes an orphan at the age of 23. At her mother’s funeral, three of her wealthy, albeit estranged cousins from New…

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2018 Grammys: Carrie Fisher, Bernie Sanders and Bruce Springsteen Contend for Best Spoken Word Album

in Potpourri by

Nominees for the 2018 Grammys were announced today and people are still talking about how this is quite possibly the most diverse list of nominees with women and people of color dominating the top categories.  Leading those nominations in all the music categories is no surprise to many: Jay-Z for his 2017 release 4:44, with eight.  While many of us tune in to the Grammys for the performances and to see if our favorites will walk away with the trophy, there are other categories that we don’t often see televised, but garner awards as well. Of interest to us is the category where books are mentioned! Audiobooks! The official category title since 1998 is “Best Spoken Word Album,” but the…

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Writer’s Bone Podcast: Friday Morning Coffee with Author Kathleen Hill

in Podcasts by

BookTrib.com recently added Writer’s Bone to our weekly features. Daniel Ford and Sean Tuohy have been bringing us weekly podcasts of discussions they have with writers about the craft of writing and what motivates them to tell a good story. Today, you can enjoy a Friday Morning Coffee podcast featuring Kathleen Hill.  Kathleen Hill, author of the recently published memoir She Read to Us in the Late Afternoons: A Life in Novels, talks to Daniel Ford about how stories she heard in her youth led her to becoming a writer, why she decided to write a memoir, and why writers need to make room within themselves for their impressions. Kathleen Hill has been teaching others her whole life. In her twenties, her husband…

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‘A Private View’: Afshin Shahidi’s New Book Gives a Rare Glimpse into Prince’s Private Life

in Non-Fiction by

One of my favorite pictures of Prince is the cover photo of Afshin Shahidi’s book, Prince: A Private View, which was released today. One of the reasons I am so enamored of this picture is due to the striking contrast of black and white in Prince’s clothing against the simplistic set— what appears to be a plain hallway. What is even more endearing to me as a 30+ year fan is that Prince, who was of a smaller stature, even in the most ordinary of spaces was ginormous. He was a larger than life figure in life and in his passing his absence has left a chasm that no artist now or in the future will be able to fill.…

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