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Video: Missed It? Interview with Carla Neggers, Author of Cider Brook

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NEW YORK TIMES Bestselling Author Carla Neggers joins BookTrib this month to talk about her new book, where she delves into a 300-year-old mystery lurking in a New England Cider Mill. Don’t miss your chance to chat live with Carla, and enter to win a copy of Cider Brook! CARLA NEGGERS Previously AIRED February 25, 2014 at 4:00 PM (ET) Cider Brook Being rescued by a good-looking, bad-boy firefighter isn’t how Samantha Bennett expected to start her stay in Knights Bridge, Massachusetts. Now she has everyone’s attention—especially that of Justin Sloan, her rescuer, who wants to know why she was camped out in an abandoned old New England cider mill. Samantha is a treasure hunter who has returned to Knights…

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Spinning whale vomit into gold

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by Elisabeth Elo The first seed of North of Boston was planted when I read an article about ambergris – whale excrement or vomit that floats in the sun, washes up on beaches, and eventually becomes a substance that was highly prized in ancient times for its healing and aphrodisiac qualities and that was—and in some cases, still is—used as a base of perfumes.  I loved the paradox, the fusion of opposites.  To think that something so disposable could be transformed through natural processes into something so valued.  Yet its essence was the same. It reminds me of the fairytale Rumpelstiltskin. (I digress, I know, but isn’t that a writer’s prerogative?)  The heroine is given the impossible task of spinning…

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Video: Missed It? John P. Davidson follows the twisted and melancholy path to assassination

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Author and journalist John P. Davidson joined BookTrib to talk about THE OBEDIENT ASSASSIN: A Novel Based on a True Story. Based on 10 years of meticulous research, Davidson recreates the story of a man at a crossroads of modern history. Viewers came question ready, and you can also enter to win a copy of his latest novel. JOHN P. DAVIDSON Aired LIVE February 5, 2014: 4:00 PM (ET) Ramón Mercader was plucked from the front of the Spanish Civil War by the Soviets and conscripted to murder the great in­tellectual, Leon Trotsky, a leader of the Bolshevik Revolution who was exiled in the 1920’s for opposing Joseph Stalin. As Ramon is trained for the task and assumes a new…

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Loved Jennifer Lawrence in WINTER’S BONE? You love Daniel Woodrell, too.

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Remember the teenage Jennifer Lawrence—pre-Katniss, pre-Hustle—who burst on to the scene in the grittier than gritty Winter’s Bone in 2010? That was thanks in large part to author Daniel Woodrell, who established himself as the voice of the hardscrabble South with the 2006 novel of the same name. Although it was not his first book, and Woodrell has long been admired in the crime fiction community, the public definitely took more notice of him after Lawrence’s portrayal of Ree Dolly earned her an Oscar nomination for Best Actress. The film also earned nods for Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Supporting Actor for John Hawkes. Woodrell has a superior ear for dialogue and rural argot, and his depiction of…

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Trouble brews in Knights Bridge: Carla Neggers talks CIDER BROOK

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by Carla Neggers Take pirates, treasure, autumn in New England and mix in a treasure hunter and a taciturn firefighter, and we have the ingredients for Cider Brook, my latest Swift River Valley novel. Trust me, no one is more surprised than Samantha Bennett when she’s caught in a burning, abandoned nineteenth-century cider mill and it’s Justin Sloan—the man who got her fired two years ago—who saves her. And Justin? He’s convinced Samantha is up to no good in little Knights Bridge. Like fictional Knights Bridge, my hometown is one of the pretty, classic villages that dot the borders of the Quabbin Reservoir, a beautiful and very real place in the middle of Massachusetts. When I was seven, we moved…

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Catching stories and fried corn

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Danger approaches 16-year-old Shelly Parker’s doorstep in Black Mountain, North Carolina, so she takes off for Georgia’s Lowcountry in Ann Hite’s The Storycatcher (Gallery Books, September 2013). The Appalachian girl—urged by the spirits who dwell in the shadows and forests surrounding her small mountain community to take precautions to avoid the disaster that is imminent—will see and experience things in the island village of Darien that she never imagined. One thing she is familiar with, from her life as the daughter of a serving woman, is fried corn. At the request of her hostess, she sets to work preparing it in the kitchen of her home-away-from-home, just the way her mother, Nada, taught her. I was curious, when I read this portion…

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When Downton Abbey meets things that (might) go bump in the night

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If gothic suspense—“one part mystery, one part ghost story, one part love story and one part thriller”—is your cup of tea, you won’t want to miss this latest tale from the practiced pen of Wendy Webb. A Midwest indie bookstore darling, Webb’s previous two books, The Fate of Mercy Alban and The Tale of Halcyon Crane, were both chosen as IndieNext and Midwest Connection picks. Her third novel, The Vanishing (published this January by Hyperion), offers readers a chance to go from the normal to the paranormal via a mansion in the Minnesota wilderness that might contain much more than drafty halls, with a heroine who might be getting glimpses into the past, and twists and turns that will keep readers guessing…

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SheReads January book club pick

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For months, we’d been calling Jennie Shortridge’s Love Water Memory the “book that got away.” Only choosing one book per month can often feel restrictive, and means that there are books we can’t pay proper attention. Love Water Memory fell into that category when it was published in April 2013. It was a novel we read and fell in love with immediately. A traumatized woman. A secret buried within the folds of her unreliable memory. A man desperate to hold on to her, even as she slips away. And above all, the tender hope of second chances and genuine healing. There was nothing neat and tidy about this novel. It was real and gritty and beautiful. We walked with Lucie and Grady…

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Go to the post office or write a novel?

in Fiction by

Let’s guess what you did today. Did it involve long lines at a) the post office, b) any store that sells items that are gift-able (not gift-worthy, just physically able to be purchased, wrapped, and presented as a holiday token) or c) both? Perhaps the only lines you accrued were the number of purchases now pending on your credit card statement, after you spent the day surfing the Internet and buying things for other people (and yourself, because, well, you deserve it after all that website navigation). Now, let’s take a look back at what some familiar names accomplished on this date in years past . Because, really, the holidays are all about comparing how cool your new toy is versus…

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Tattoos are forever

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Remember that Swedish girl, the one with the tattoos? She’s back. Or at least she will be in 2015. No one needs to be reminded how many copies the dearly departed Swede Stieg Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy have sold (millions) or in how many languages you can read about the adventures of star hacker Lisbeth Salander and occasionally disgraced journalist Mikael Blomkvist (here’s a hint: how many states are in the Union?). Don’t forget the film versions, bringing audiences Scandinavian moodiness in two languages and deeply dividing book fans into competing (Swedish) Noomi Rapace and (American) Rooney Mara camps. A decade after The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo came out in Sweden, back when Larsson was an unknown (and, unfortunately, also…

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Love life got you down? Cheer up! At least you’re not married to a writer

in Non-Fiction by

We’ve all heard, and told, our share of dating horror stories. Even for those who’ve found “the one,” maintaining relationships can be a struggle. If you’re feeling down about your latest bad date or marital spat, nothing can cheer you up quite like hearing about someone else’s disasters in love. And no one seems to have it quite as bad as those with the misfortune to fall for a writer. In Writers Between the Covers, authors Shannon McKenna Schmidt and Joni Rendon dish on the scandalous, appalling, and heart-wrenching love lives of some of the world’s most famous writers. Compared with the experiences of these spurned, used, and jilted lovers, your latest dating misfortune probably doesn’t seem so rotten. No…

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