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Espionage

Spies, Lies, Goodbyes and the Quest For Blue

in Thrillers by

The color blue—one of the rarest colors on earth. It is the color of the sky and sea, of eternity, of divinity. And sometimes the color of death. A color which proved to be at the heart of the race for the most coveted porcelain in the world. In The Blue (Endeavour Quill), Nancy Bilyeau uses the 18th century race to manufacture porcelain—adding spies from England and France—to create a historical thriller with an ingenious premise. Twenty-four-year-old Genevieve Planché is a passionate painter but may not pursue her art; historical painting is not appropriate for women in 1758 England. Although she paints flowers on silk dresses, and will soon become a decorator at Derby Porcelain Works, her work is almost…

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“Queen of Kenosha:” A Guitar-Playing, Nazi-Busting Heroine

in Pop Culture by

October is Graphic Novel Writing Month, and to celebrate, why not try reading a gem from this genre? Queen of Kenosha, (Animal Media Group) written by Howard Shapiro and illustrated by Erica Chan, is a vibrant tale featuring a heroine who is passionate about the work she does, both in the music industry and as a secret operative.  Want more BookTrib? Sign up NOW for news and giveaways! It’s 1963 New York City, and Nina Overstreet is anything but your typical recruit for an undercover mission to bring Nazis down. Primarily a singer trying to make it big with a record company with the help of her close friend and agent Christina, Nina also lends a hand at a karate class to make…

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‘The Woman Who Smashed Codes’: An Interview with Author Jason Fagone

in Nonfiction by

Journalist Jason Fagone has tapped into a little-known piece of history with his latest book, The Woman Who Smashed Codes.” Fagone’s book tells the story of Elizebeth Friedman, whose ability to crack codes in language and writings for the National Security Agency (NSA) during World War II made her an invaluable asset to the nation. Her husband, William had long been recognized by NSA as the “founder of the science of modern American cryptology,” but Elizebeth’s reputation as a master codebreaker is what bought them both the most notoriety. Taking place at a time in history where women’s contributions to STEM fields and other areas where the most intricate knowledge and skills must be applied, Elizebeth was often left out…

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Anthony Horowitz’s Trigger Mortis Contains Ian Fleming 007 Material

in Fiction by

This fall, James Bond is reporting for duty—in two different stories in two different media, and in two different eras. The man known as 007 will first appear in Trigger Mortis (HarperCollins, September 8, 2015) by Anthony Horowitz, the latest novel bearing the stamp of approval from the estate of Bond creator Ian Fleming. Fleming passed away back in 1964, shortly after the publication of You Only Live Twice, the 12th novel featuring the character who would, thanks to his cinema incarnation, become fiction’s greatest spy. After Fleming’s death, two of his Bond works would be published posthumously: 1965’s The Man with the Golden Gun and a collection of short stories titled Octopussy and The Living Daylights (1966). Over the…

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The Cold War Returns in the Man from U.N.C.L.E.

in Fiction by

Ever find yourself pining for the simpler time of the Cold War? Ah, those were the days. There were only two sides: Them vs. Us. Good vs. Evil. Spy vs. Spy. So there’s good news for those of you who liked your war cold: This week (which happens to mark the 54th anniversary of the construction of the Berlin Wall), The Man From U.N.C.L.E hits the big screen. And while the movie—a remake of the popular 1960s TV show—may not be an accurate representation of the world of professional espionage, it does represent a throwback to an era when spies were cool; their martinis were shaken, not stirred; and they all came equipped with awesome gadgets to help them foil…

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Gayle Lynds spins tale of intrigue in The Assassins

in Fiction by

When master spy Judd Ryder returns in The Assassins (St. Martin’s Press; June 30, 2015) the latest thriller from best-selling author Gayle Lynds, he’s not only doing battle with the Carnivore, an infamous Cold War killer. He’s fighting for his life, his reputation and his destiny—all the while conducting a delicate balancing act deciding whether and when to unleash his own deadly abilities. “Judd is a reluctant hero,” Lynds said in an exclusive interview with BookTrib. “He doesn’t like ‘the life’ in espionage because he’s really good at it, and that frightens him. He has a power inside him, as many of us do, but his is a darker power. So he’s always on that razor’s edge of when to…

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Video: Missed It? Live Interview with Jack MacLean, Author of Global Predator

in Fiction by

ABOUT GLOBAL PREDATOR High above the mountains of the North West Frontier, a Global Predator circles waiting to unleash its Hellfire missiles. The trail of Osama Bin Laden’s deputy, the elusive Egyptian terror master, Ayman al-Zawahiri has gone cold until a chance recording identified by a translator at the National Security Agency offers new clues. A special intelligence team assembles and plots to catch at him at a meeting with other high ranking al Qaeda leaders. In Pakistan’s beautiful Swat Valley, the local Taliban have been stepping up their attacks on anyone educating girls. English aid worker Sally is taken hostage while visiting one of her schools. When Wilkins, escaping his reckless trading mistakes at his London bank, is forced…

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