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compassion

Spartan Up! ‘Born to Run’ Author Christopher McDougall on the Making of a Hero

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Author of the International best-seller, Born to Run, Christopher McDougall is constantly seeking out new challenges, pushing the limits and proving that most skills simply lie dormant within all of us, just waiting to be discovered. Here, McDougall talks with Spartan Up’s Joe De Sena, founder and CEO of Spartan Race, to answer some very important questions about success, compassion and what actually makes a hero. For more, watch the podcast above. ABOUT SPARTAN UP! THE PODCAST: Every day, Joe De Sena, founder and CEO of Spartan Race and a New York Times bestselling author, inspires millions of people all over the world to get off the couch and take on any obstacle, on an off the course. In Spartan Up! The…

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TED Talks: Bryan Stevenson on Identity and Injustice

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Black History Month ends in just a few days, so this week’s installment of TED Talks Tuesday is one of the most elegant examinations of race in America ever given on the TED stage. Human Rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson’s moving talk from TED 2012 paints a hard picture of America’s criminal justice framework – but he does more than illustrate the obvious problems with our current system. Stevenson urges people to become more aware of what he calls “the dark and difficult things” in today’s society, and argues that history judges societies by how they treat their most disenfranchised populations. It goes beyond the political, and moves into the realms of morality and cultural self-awareness with a grace, courage and…

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4 Ways Being a Writer Teaches You to be a Better Person

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I used to say, “I fooled people into thinking I was nice.” I’m not a classically “nice” person. I’m blunt, I’m impatient, I’m selfish and I’m judgmental. In short, I’m very, very human. I consider myself tremendously blessed to be a writer. Why? Because every day I spend writing is day I spend learning to be a better human. I can look around now, after years of writing, and realize—with more than bit of shock—that I’m really not fooling people anymore. The traits I used to pretend to have are now ones that come—more and more—with habitual ease, and all because the habits and mindsets I’ve developed in an effort to improving my writing have in turn improved all other…

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