Tag archive

characters

Writer’s Bone Podcast: Kat Howard Talks Writing in This Friday Morning Coffee

in Podcasts by

BookTrib.com recently added Writer’s Bone to our weekly features. Daniel Ford and Sean Tuohy have been bringing us weekly podcasts of discussions they have with writers about the craft of writing and what motivates them to tell a good story. Today, you can enjoy a Friday Morning Coffee podcast featuring Kat Howard. Kat Howard, author of An Unkindness of Magicians and Roses and Rot, talks to Daniel Ford about crafting the memorable characters you meet in An Unkindness of Magicians and why writers need to find the writing process that works best for them. Kat Howard is best known for her fantasy, science fiction, and horror writing. Her work has been nominated for the World Fantasy Award. To learn more about Kat Howard,…

Keep Reading

Review: A Favorite ‘Sourdough’ Recipe Changes Everything

in Fiction by

Sourdough by Robin Sloan is the perfect blend of culinary secrets and technological experiments, filled with excitement and drama. Lois is a programmer who spends her endless days writing code and programming a robot arm. She resorts to drinking a Slurry (an unappealing nutritional concoction) for lunch during the day, and ordering delivery of spicy soup with delicious bread from a neighborhood hole in the wall at night. She falls into this comfortable routine and when the delivery guy tells her he and his brother, the chef, have to leave the country, she is distraught. Because she has become to them the “Number One Eater”, they are leaving her with a valuable secret…the special starter for the sourdough bread she adores,…

Keep Reading

PBS’s “Buried Alive” Unmasks the Truth About Edgar Allan Poe

in Non-Fiction by

The idea of “fake news” feels like a recent phenomenon, a term made popular in the past year thanks to the controversial 2016 election. But as it turns out, “fake news” has been happening for far longer than that, with victims of false reporting sprinkled throughout our history. One of those historical victims? The grandfather of horror himself, Edgar Allan Poe. Famous for his dark writing and haunting plots, Poe has become synonymous with gothic horror. But his private life is considered just as notorious as his work, with rumors about the author pervading our literary culture. Some say that he was just as mad as his characters, while others mention his sexual perversions and opioid addictions. Even his death…

Keep Reading

Trending Topics: #LegendsOfTomorrow Related MUST Reads!

in Fiction by

DC’s newest hit, Legends of Tomorrow, has just entered its riveting and action-packed third season and we’re already hooked! The series, based on the characters of some of our favorite DC comics growing up, follows a Time Master known as Rip Hunter, who goes rogue after his family is killed. We’re overly excited to hear about what this season of #LegendsOfTomorrow has to offer and we feel a connection with some of the familiar characters we have grown to love. We have four suggestions for new novels to add to your bookshelf based on some of your favorite characters, which you don’t want to miss: Atom: Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, Neil deGrasse Tyson Atom, also known as Ray Palmer on the show,…

Keep Reading

Tall Poppies Review: Past and Present Become Chaos in Amy Impellizzeri’s ‘The Truth About Thea’

in Fiction by

At BookTrib, we are constantly searching for the best ways to connect readers with writers, opening their eyes and worlds to fresh ideas! This is how we came across a wonderful group known as the Tall Poppies, who are not only avid readers, but extremely talented writers as well! This week we gain some insight on Amy Impellizzeri’s novel The Truth About Thea.  The Truth About Thea by Amy Impellizzeri is a page-turner that’s innovative, current, and thoughtfully rendered. When entrepreneur Thea is diagnosed with a pathological addiction to creating fake social media identities for her clients, she begins a court-mandated program of treatment with therapist Will Cann. Ordinarily, this is when things would begin to get better. But there…

Keep Reading

Adapting One Historical Novel to Another: How to Make It Work

in Fiction by

BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. We’ve all been there: We read a novel, and wonder “How did the author do that?!” Sophfronia Scott has written just such a novel. Her book Unforgivable Love is a retelling of Dangerous Liaisons that will enchant and entertain readers with its historical flair. Here, she tells Bookish readers just how she went about adapting the original. Ideas are a dime a dozen—they exist in multitudes and any creative thinker knows there is no shortage of good ideas. Still there’s a fascination with ideas and they are considered scarce—that’s why authors consistently get asked how they found the idea for their latest work. But the idea is only the beginning. Two writers can start…

Keep Reading

‘Life Is A Wheel… It Always Comes Back Around To Where It Started’: Stephen King’s Life in Books

in Fiction by

Stephen King has thrilled readers for more than four decades with a body of work that effortlessly combines scintillating fear and some very uniquely memorable characters.  King, who recently turned 70, is as unique and memorable as his characters and has lead a life that is just as interesting as his books. Check out these 6 facts about the unique talent that is Stephen King and great books that shed some light on the character of the man, himself. 1. Stephen King is a huge Red Sox fan (despite his disapproval of Fenway Park safety nets in the past). For those of you who can’t get enough of King or the Boston Red Sox, this fact is enough to get the blood flowing!…

Keep Reading

Mental Health and Family Relationships Come Together in Yoerg’s ‘All the Best People’

in Fiction by

At BookTrib, we are constantly searching for the best ways to connect readers with writers, opening their eyes and worlds to fresh ideas! This is how we came across a wonderful group known as the Tall Poppies, who are not only avid readers, but extremely talented writers as well! This week, Katie Pryal reviews Sonja Yoerg’s ‘All the Best People.’ The heart of Sonja Yoerg’s All the Best People is Carole LaPorte, one of the book’s narrators, a mother of three and wife to Walt, the owner of an auto shop in small-town 1970s Vermont. Carole’s world starts to fall apart when she begins to question whether she might be like her mother, Solange, who has been locked in Underhill, the…

Keep Reading

Gaynor and Webb’s ‘Last Christmas in Paris’ Mixes Relationships and Tragedy

in Fiction by

At BookTrib, we are constantly searching for the best ways to connect readers with writers, opening their eyes and worlds to fresh ideas! This is how we came across a wonderful group known as the Tall Poppies, who are not only avid readers, but extremely talented writers as well! This week’s Tall Poppies review of Last Christmas in Paris relays a beautifully crafted story love and dreams in the wake of war human tragedy. War changes everything–individuals, relationships, priorities, dreams– so it’s not surprising that stories set in wartime are so popular and, in this case, so engrossing. In Last Christmas in Paris, best friends Will and Tom head off to fight the Germans, leaving behind Will’s sister, Evie, and, soon…

Keep Reading

Creating Characters That Readers Love: 3 Tips for Writers

in Potpourri by

Walt Gragg, author of ‘The Red Line,’ shares with us and you his tips for creating unforgettable characters readers will surely love. One of the great things about being a writer is that you get to meet so many other writers along the way. From the extremely famous to the highly obscure, the chance to interact and talk about the trade with others who are a part of this business happens for most of us at least a couple of times each year. Something you soon learn is that none of us goes about the process of creating a novel in exactly the same way. There are as many approaches to this craft as there are people writing. No one…

Keep Reading

Abduction and Raw Emotion in ‘The Atlas of Forgotten Places’

in Fiction by

Don’t let this exceptional new novel fall under the radar! Based on war-torn Africa and the innocent people caught in the middle, the stunning debut of The Atlas of Forgotten Places by Jenny D. Williams takes us to Uganda where a young girl, Lily, goes missing. The authorities are hard to come by and disorganized, so her aunt Sabine, a former aid worker, travels from Germany to the village where she was last seen. She intends to trace Lily’s steps and try to understand if she was in danger and kidnapped, or if she had a motive to disappear. At the same time a Ugandan woman, Rose (who was previously kidnapped and abused by the Lord’s Resistance Army but now back in…

Keep Reading

Common Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them: Advice for Writers of Fantasy

in Fiction by

Where do you get your news? If you’re like me, it’s a combo of Twitter, Colbert, and as little TV as I can get away with. (And then, the shower-crying.) As we continue to build and populate our fantasy world, it’s worth thinking about where your beekeepers, wenches, and princesses get their information. Does your agrarian worker’s paradise have the internet? (Trick question: by definition paradise has no internet.) Is your steampunk city (so many gears!) equipped with a brass and glass version of telephones? Does your underwater domed kingdom communicate with its neighbors by courier-fish? As always, that’s one of the pleasures of a DIY world–there aren’t any wrong answers. However, there must be answers. (And some of them will…

Keep Reading

Jon Land’s ‘Dark Light Dawn’ Comes with a Vengeance

in Fiction by

Navy Seal Max Younger emerges from the shadows with a strange luck and an unnatural ability to kill. Plagued by fits of rage and bloody visions of his own future, Max is never certain whether he is man or monster. But when dark forces unleash an otherworldly pathogen, the monster comes out with a vengeance. Max Younger may be part angel or part demon. The line between the two runs terribly thin. In Dark Light Dawn, Jon Land and Fabrizio Boccardi, the team that brought the Tyrant to life, return with a new dark hero that instantly hits blockbuster status. Intense military combat and paranormal thrills slam together like peanut butter and chocolate. The two, it seems, were made for…

Keep Reading

‘A House Among the Trees’ is Chock Full of Eccentric, Detailed Characters

in Fiction by

In author Julia Glass’s latest character-driven novel, A House Among the Trees, Mort Lear, a famous children’s author, vaguely reminiscent of Maurice Sendak, unexpectedly falls to his death off the roof of his Connecticut home in a fluke accident. His longtime, live-in assistant Tomasina (Tommy) is left to pick up the pieces, address his fortune, complete unfinished business and come to terms with their co-dependent relationship. In addition, surprising details of Morty’s past surface, causing Tommy to question how well she actually knew him. When Tommy was a child she saw an eccentric man sketching pictures of her little brother as she watched over him on the playground. She gave the man the O.K. to continue as long as her…

Keep Reading

Just the Right Book! Episode 35: Colm Toibin on ‘House of Names’

in Podcasts by

Just the Right Book! Podcast, hosted by Roxanne Coady of Connecticut’s acclaimed, award-winning, independent bookseller R.J. Julia, is now available on BookTrib.com, the premier website where readers meet writers. The podcast and BookTrib are both dedicated to helping readers find their next favorite read and this pairing will open up a world of great possibilities. In this week’s episode, Roxanne Coady hits the stage to speak with Colm Toibin, the award-winning author of seven novels, including The Master and Brooklyn. Colm Toibin joined Coady to speak with her and the audience about his newest novel, House of Names, which is a retelling of the Greek myth of Clytemnestra, Agamemnon, and their children. He shares a lot of insight on the plot…

Keep Reading

How ‘A Horse Walks Into a Bar’ Sheds Light on Advocacy

in Fiction by

A Horse Walks Into a Bar, the 2017 Man Booker International Prize Winner, is a stunning account of a middle aged, washed up comedian’s stand up show, but there is so much more. Taking place in the Israeli city of Netanya, Dovaleh Greenstein has invited a high school friend from military camp, Avishai Lavar, to watch the performance and then let him know what he sees…the person he really sees. In the audience, in addition to Lavar, now a retired judge, there is an unusual woman from Dov’s old neighborhood in attendance; a little person who endured bullying all her life, and throughout the show interjects comments and contributes her recollections from childhood. This book takes a hard look at…

Keep Reading

Go to Top