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America

Sorting Through Fiction and Non-Fiction Narratives

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At Delphinium, we often ponder the difference between fiction and non-fiction narrative, and it seems more and more that these two literary distinctions are being blurred. Even though the memoir genre is still thriving, it’s now generally understood that memoirs are embellished, truth laced with invention; and yet it’s also true that many memoirs could not be successfully published as novels. With a memoir, it’s the very idea—or in some cases, the illusion—of confession that makes a book saleable. The premise is that a memoir will attract a reader who can believe they have gone through an experience similar to the one they read about. For this reason, memoirists—and their publishers—may be reluctant to divulge whatever is actually invented. Could…

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Read, White, and Blue: Books About America

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. It’s the 4th of July, and this time of year, we’re reminded that so many authors have put pen to paper to write about life in the United States. Some have penned memoirs, others have written novels, and still others have produced nonfiction or even poetry. These books range widely in subject matter, tone, and content, but they’re all united by a common focus on life in America. If you feel like reading about the U.S.A., there’s a book for you on this list no matter what your reading preferences may be.   In this forthcoming book of essays, writers like Roxane Gay and Lin-Manuel Miranda share their stories about being Americans whose experiences and cultural identities aren’t…

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The Elegance and Beauty of a Struggling Family

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In her heartfelt and elegantly written debut of a beautiful, struggling family, it’s clear that Fatima Farheen Mirza is a gifted writer. She is more than able to make you feel every character’s emotions, while offering compassion for different views, gradually revealing different aspects of each story to create a multilayered tapestry. A Place For Us begins at Hadia’s wedding in California, where the family gathers to celebrate a marriage based on love, rather than one that was arranged. Huda, the middle child, is determined to be like her sister more and more, headstrong and bold. Lastly, Amar, Hadia’s younger brother who ran away three years earlier, has returned for the celebration, taking his place as the brother of the bride.…

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Writer’s Bone Podcast: Sam Quinones’ ‘True Tale of an American Epidemic’ in ‘Dreamland’

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Author and journalist Sam Quinones talks to Daniel Ford about what led him to journalism, his research and writing process for Dreamland, and his experience testifying in front of the Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions Committee about the opioid crisis in the United States.   Read a preview of Dreamland below:   To learn more Sam Quinones, visit his official website, like his Facebook page, or follow him on Twitter @samquinones7.       Sign up NOW for exclusive BookTrib news, interviews and giveaways!

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#AmericaRecycles: Our Picks for the Environmentally Conscious Reader

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For the past few decades, we have been celebrating #AmericaRecycles as a way for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to recognize our nation’s progress on recycling, making a better future for generations to come. Go green today and pick up one of these environmentally conscious reads… and don’t forget to recycle when you are done!   Silent Spring, Rachel Carson Silent Spring has come a long way, where it was first published as excerpts in 1962. The book itself changed the way we look at the environment, and actually spurred revolutionary changes in that laws that affect our air, land, and water in America today. And who better to talk about the future of our planet itself than Rachel Carson, who has…

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‘No Good Reasons At All’: A Literary View of the Full Implications of War

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Reckless saber-rattling with an unstable despot and growing nuclear power in North Korea, sixteen years of fighting in Afghanistan, insurmountable issues in the Middle East, irrational bigotry and hatred consuming far too many, an enemy power’s blatant interference with the sovereignty of our electoral process, terrorism both domestic and foreign, indiscriminately striking every corner of the world, American soldiers dying in far away places we didn’t even know we had a presence, an administration neither aware or concerned with the potential implications of entering into war and by all appearances far too eager to do so – all issues that take place in our country. We live in challenging times. Given the implications of modern warfare, if we make a…

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Historic Wonder and What-if’s Bring James Mauro’s ‘Twilight’ to Life

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I’m not a big fan of non-fiction… but with all those topics to choose from, surely I could find something I wanted to read about. I got the book at the library down the street. I needed to read Twilight at the World of Tomorrow because Mauro is a friend of mine. I was a little nervous because I didn’t know what I was going to say if I didn’t like it. I couldn’t imagine Jim writing anything mediocre – he was, after all, once an editor of the now defunct but iconic SPY magazine in Manhattan – but what if? The “what-if” went away pretty quickly- by the time I finished reading the author’s note at the beginning of the…

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Your Next TV Obsession: PBS’ ‘The Great American Read’

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BookTrib is partnering with Early Bird Books to bring you more great content, including this article on the latest and greatest television series on PBS: “The Great American Read.” In an announcement that set our bookish hearts a-flutter, PBS revealed the latest addition to their television line-up: “The Great American Read.” Slated to air throughout the summer of 2018, the show will explore our beloved literary treasures (as chosen, in part, by a committee of literary professionals) as it leads a nationwide search for America’s favorite read. In other words: it’s the bookworm’s answer to the Super Bowl. Kicking things off is a two-hour premiere that will feature notable figures—from famous literati and Hollywood stars to newscasters and sports icons—as they champion the titles that…

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13 Books You Absolutely Must Read Before Seeing Kathryn Bigelow’s ‘Detroit’

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The Summer of ’67 was a unique time in America’s history that some fondly remember as a season full of love, music and flower power. Still, for others in major American cities, that summer was awash in civil unrest, where waves of injustice led to rebellion and social change. A new film directed by Kathryn Bigelow and starring John Boyega, Anthony Mackie, Will Poulter and Algee Smith re-enacts the 1967 incident at Algiers Motel in Detroit that left three young men dead. This event marked a turning point in the civil rights movement when lost innocence gave way to a revolution now undeterred by fear. The youth of the day had seen the worst and they were ready to fight so in…

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Amazon No. 1 New Release ‘The Cooking Gene’ Talks Food Traditions in the Old South

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Like the author himself, The Cooking Gene (Amistad, August 1, 2017) by Michael W. Twitty defies easy categorization. Not quite a memoir, nor historical nonfiction, nor a cookbook, it combines elements of all three to take us on a historical journey that shows how African foodways formed and informed the American diet and how the history of a people can be writ large in the food they ate. When Twitty approached publishers about his work as a culinary historian investigating the African-American roots of Southern cuisine, he was told that his identity was too complex and his work didn’t fit neatly into any one genre. But his unique, intersectional perspective as an African-American gay Jew brings insight to every facet of…

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Author Imbolo Mbue Answers One Question about “Behold the Dreamers”

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The white picket fence with a rose garden out front; a four-bedroom home with 2.5 children and a quarter-acre backyard, including enough room for a swing and a grill; A stable job with a 20-minute commute into town and enough to pay off the mortgage. To many, this is the “American Dream.” To others, like myself, I think of the opening scene of David Lynch’s Blue Velvet. It might seem hunky-dory but there’s something festering and just not right underneath. I’m not knocking people if they have those aspirations — I’m simply saying they’re imperfect. Imbolo Mbue takes the nature of the American Dream to task in her debut novel, Behold the Dreamers (Random House, August 23 2016). Two families are…

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Here’s Why Edgar Allan Poe Still Matters

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Celebrating the death rather than the birthday of the master of the macabre, is only fitting. On this day October 7, 1849 Edgar Allan Poe died at the age of 40 after he was found in a gutter on a side street in Baltimore, Maryland. Some people say he died from an opium overdose, others say it was alcohol poisoning, some believe it was pneumonia, or murder? No one knows. The circumstances surrounding his death intensifies his mystique. It’s eerie and strangely perfect at the same time that a man famous for composing the scariest stories ever would die under a shadow of mystery and suspicion. I had the fortune of being introduced to Poe when, at 9 years old, I…

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