Author

Rachel Fogle De Souza

Rachel Fogle De Souza has 112 articles published.

Rachel Fogle De Souza
Rachel Fogle De Souza was born and raised in Connecticut, and traveled extensively throughout Europe, parts of Asia, and the United States, before attending college at the University of California, Davis, where she received a B.A. in Comparative Literature, with a double minor in Women, Gender and Sexualities studies, and Middle Eastern/South Asian studies. When she's not writing, she's reading, boxing, or thinking about traveling.

Pretty Little Liars’ Sara Shepard on Her Latest Adult Thriller, “The Elizas”

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One of the books at the top of our must-read list for this year was The Elizas (Atria Books), which just seemed to have every element you want out of a thriller: a narrator who isn’t quite sure what’s going on but whom no one will believe; a case of identity confusion; a beautiful location; and last, but perhaps most important, a writer who really knows what she’s doing. Sara Shepard has a talent for writing some of the most complex and layered plots to ever hit the page, but she does so with what seems like little to no effort, and manages to explain everything out in the end in a way that has you berating yourself for not seeing it before.…

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Ten’s Gretchen McNeil: How to Make Serial Killers Fun

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Gretchen McNeil is not only an incredibly talented author, she’s also a professionally trained opera singer, a natural performer, and one of the nicest people we’ve ever met. The hit YA author is probably best known for her book Ten, which won numerous awards before being turned into a Lifetime original movie. Then, just to cement her place in our hearts as the reigning queen of YA horror, she came out with with the two book Don’t Get Mad series, with Get Even being released in 2014, and the follow-up Get Dirty in 2015. Now, she’s back with a new YA horror novel, #MurderTrending. But this one’s doing something new, which is showcasing McNeil’s natural affinity for comedy. While we all know that comedy and horror together can…

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Gigged: Sarah Kessler on Future of the Job Market

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Uber, Lyft, TaskRabbit – these are only a few of the avenues available for people looking for work in the “gig economy.” Ten years ago, Uber wasn’t even heard of, but now it’s something used as commonly as an iPhone. Gigs are – or at least are advertised as – ways for people to make money on their own time, doing only the jobs that they want to. Sounds great, right? But that doesn’t mean that there aren’t serious drawbacks. With an increase in gigging over the past few years, it’s made some waves, not only in companies and company policy, but also, on certain occasions, in politics. Just a week or so ago, Uber won a 15-month license to…

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Riley Sager on Summer Camp and Stephen King

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Last year, there was one book at the top of everyone’s must-read list: Riley Sager’s Final Girls, which was so good, Stephen King himself called it “The first great thriller of 2017.” If that’s not proof enough that Sager knows his way around the thriller, then just know that his follow up to Final Girls has been lauded by the likes of The Woman in the Window‘s A.J. Finn, The Last Mrs. Parrish‘s Liv Constantine and The Perfect Stranger‘s Megan Miranda, just to name a few. The Last Time I Lied, Sager’s latest novel, was just released today, so make sure to carve out some time for yourself so you can head down to your local bookstore to pick up a copy. Not only does The Last Time I…

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Tara Isabella Burton’s Debut and Deadly Relationships

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This year, we’ve seen a lot of books that seem to just raise the bar on what we can expect from literature in terms of mesmerizing plots, spellbinding characters and twists no one ever saw coming. But debut novel Social Creature, with its eye-catching cover that stops you in your tracks may just have raised the bar above all the others. Equally hypnotic and provocative, the novel focuses on the friendship between two women: Louise living on her own, barely making rent with no real relationships with anyone, not even her own family; and Lavinia, living in an apartment on the Upper East Side, funded by her parents, and taking part in everything the high life in New York has to offer.…

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Debut Authors Amy Brewer and Patty Carothers on Collaboration and Writing a Happy Ending

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Rarely nowadays do we find books in the Young Adult genre that aren’t filled with death, murder, bullying, depression, and more. While books with these themes do hold an important place in literature, the market, after the success of books like 13 Reasons Why, has become saturated – if not over-saturated – with similar narratives and themes. Which is why reading the debut novel of friends and writing collaborators Patty Carothers and Amy Brewer feels like something of a breath of fresh air. Their debut work, Texting Prince Charming, as hinted at in the title, reads like a fairy tale – with a twist. After a tragic car accident, Shelby Ryan lost more than just her entire family – she’s also left…

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Joanna Cantor on Her Debut Novel, Yoga, and Writing About Grief

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This year, we’ve had some pretty standout books that have been published across the genres, but debut author Joanna Cantor’s novel Alternative Remedies For Loss has become one of the most talked about and beloved books, even though it was released just a few weeks ago. Though this is her debut, Cantor’s novel actually tackles some of the hardest things to write about clearly: the contradiction of life in your early 20s, where everything seems to be standing still yet happening too fast and all at once; grief and the feeling of permanent loss; and recovery, acceptance of our lives the way they are. And she manages to do all this effortlessly. Alternative Remedies For Loss focuses on 22-year-old Olivia, who, when…

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30 Books Perfect for Summer Reading

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Summer holds a special place in the heart of book readers: yes, fall and winter are both excellent for cozying up with the latest thriller, novel, or romance, but summer brings with it the heat that just makes you want to lie down on a beach somewhere with your sunglasses and the latest bestseller that just hit the bookshelves. The only problem? Finding the perfect book. We’ve compiled together a list of 30 books that we think are perfect summer reads. With publication dates ranging from April through July, your reading shelf is covered all summer long. Take a look at the books down below, and with a mix of everything from literary fiction and romance to thrillers and memoirs,…

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Charlie Donlea’s Fictional Answer to Crime Docu-Dramas

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Over the past few years, podcasts and television shows like Serial and Netflix’s Making A Murderer have taken over the country, if not the world. Thousands of people tune in every day to find out what happened next in these real-life cases where the question of did they or didn’t they pervades throughout the entire trial and beyond. Now, in a thriller unlike any other out there, Charlie Donlea has provided us with the book we didn’t even know we could have. Don’t Believe It is basically the literary answer to those true crime dramas: Sidney Ryan is a filmmaker, whose on-going docu-drama The Girl of Sugar Beach has taken over the country. Ten years previous in St. Lucia, Grace Sebold was arrested and convicted…

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The Hype About New Psycho Thriller And Its Debut Author

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It’s one of the most talked about books, included on every list of recommendations, no matter what the occasion. Tangerine, the psychological thriller by debut author Christine Mangan, is not only beautifully written prose, but electric in imagery. Taking place in Tangier, Morocco, in the 1950s, the novel is vivid and full of heat, winding the characters up tighter and tighter as events around them begin to fall apart, only adding further to the feelings of claustrophobia and anxiety that are the hallmarks of every great thriller. Alice and Lucy used to be best friends and roommates, practically inseparable. But after an accident, the two haven’t spoken in over a year – which is why Alice is so startled when Lucy shows…

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Happening This Week: Best, Must-Attend Literary Events In and Around New York City

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If you were on the east coast this weekend, storms, heavy winds, down trees and power outages kept many of us indoors.  As book lovers, we really don’t mind because it just gives us a chance to pick up that new Spring read we’ve been meaning to get to or return to one of our favorite classics. But, that was last week. This week, we’re getting out of the house and so should you! If you are in or around New York City, here are some of he best literary events happening this week in the Big Apple: Monday, March 5, 2018: Bard College Professor and bestselling author Daniel Mendelsohn will be reading from his new memoir, An Odyssey: A Father, a Son, and an…

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BookTrib Review: ‘Summer Hours at the Robbers Library’ Is Worth Checking Out

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Libraries are here to stay. Long after your corner coffeehouse has been turned into a drug store, your local library will be there to embrace you with an ever-changing community of avid readers. Summer Hours at the Robbers Library (Harper Perennial) by veteran author and journalist Sue Halpern offers an introspective and poignant look at the lives of people who frequent libraries and the unlikely relationships that form between the pages. For Kit, the head librarian at the Robbers Library, libraries offer a sense of peace. No one expects her to talk about the problems that shook her out of the settled, quiet suburban life she thought she’d have forever. Kit’s peaceful life is headed for a surprise, however, with the arrival of 15-year-old,…

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‘The Great American Read’ Premieres in PBS in May

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What book changed you the moment you read it? Maybe it’s a book like Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, where you fell in love with her ability to create witty banter; or maybe, that book is something of a shocking, gripping tale, full of anger that draws you back in like Richard Wright’s Native Son. Either way, books play a fair part in helping us shape who we are – and, if we re lucky, they can change us for the better. Thankfully, PBS seems to get that. This spring, PBS will premiere their 8-part television and online series, The Great American Read, which explores 100 of the most beloved books in America, and how they’ve inspired and changed social life. The first show airs…

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New York Times Best Seller Laura Lippman is Back with ‘Sunburn’ an Intriguing and Provocative Literary Noir Novel

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There’s nothing quite like a thriller that embodies everything we love about the noir genre: the mind games, cat-and-mouse-like chases, forbidden desires, dark pasts and even darker secrets. Literary noir is in a whole realm of its own. The latest and most anticipated addition to the genre is Laura Lippman’s Sunburn.  Lippman is best known for her Tess Monaghan Series about a Baltimore reporter-turned-accidental Private Investigator. Sunburn, however, promises to be a dark, provocative and heady new addition to Lippman’s resume. Polly and Adam meet randomly at a tavern in Delaware, both strangers just passing through. Polly’s headed out West, and Adam’s leaving to go somewhere else, too. Yet somehow, they both end up staying, winding into a summer-long affair, full of romance and sex.…

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Review: ‘Look For Her’ Sees the Thrilling Return of Keene and Frohmann in a Brand New Mystery

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Psychological thrillers are all the rage! These books, especially by our favorite writers in the genre, are staples on best sellers lists,  raising the bar for the next author to thrill us even more. With the release of Look For Her, author Emily Winslow not only raises the bar, she kicks it out the park. Look For Her is Winslow’s latest Keene and Frohmann Mystery Series and bears all the classic hallmarks of those books: the lush, beautiful scenery of Cambridge and the surrounding countryside, a complex and twisted plot and haunting mind-games that raise the hair on your arms. This time, Winslow brings us to an idyllic English village where decades ago, a girl named Annalise Wood went missing on her way home from school.…

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Modesty Blaise: Clever, Cunning, Daring and Kick-Ass

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Modesty Blaise was first introduced as a comic-strip in the middle of the 1960s by author Peter O’Donnell. Not only was she beautiful, she was clever, cunning, daring and she knew how to kick ass. For me, she was the heroine I wanted to be. For those who don’t know who Modesty Blaise is, please allow me to introduce you: Modesty Blaise is the anti-James Bond James Bond. That is, yes, she occasionally went on missions for the British Secret Intelligence Service, but that was only after she retired from being the head of The Network, her own international criminal organization. Along with her sidekick, second-in-command and trusted friend Garvin (they debuted in 1963 and still never really got together, by…

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