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Writing

The Inspiration Behind Brae’s “Eight Goodbyes”

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Eight Goodbyes by Christine Brae is one of the featured titles in BookTrib’s initial “Book Club Booster Program,” in which the book will be included as part of a gift package sent this month to 50 U.S. chapters of The Girly Book Club. My stories have always been spurred by actual events. Eight Goodbyes is no different.   The idea came to me after a chance encounter on a flight to New York two years ago. Since it started on an airplane, I decided to immortalize that one event and build a story around it. As with all my other books, this story incorporates many personal experiences. It highlights the wanderlust that is a huge part of my life, the…

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The Privileges and Difficulties of Editing Greatness

in Potpourri by

I’ve had the privilege of editing the work of writers who have published many books and have come to Delphinium later on in their careers. Editing a master is very different than editing a new writer. Established authors have managed to stay in the game for decades and beyond their sheer talent, they’ve had to develop a dogged perseverance to keep writing and publishing despite the success or failure of their previous books. Not to mention the fact that each of these authors have had bad experiences with editors who, while admiring their work enough to publish it, perhaps never digested it fully enough to be able to edit carefully and successfully. Being a writer myself and watching the relative…

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Life as a New Author: What to Expect from Your New Publisher

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Author and BookTrib contributor, Walt Gragg discusses life as a new author and the publishing process— from writing your manuscript to promotion your book and handling film/TV option requests. In this piece, Gragg discusses what new writers can expect from their publisher after they have signed their first book contract. Your editor will call shortly after you sign the contract. While you’re excited that things are moving forward, be aware that it can take anywhere from eighteen months to four years before your book will be released. Depending on the editor, you may be provided with a release date during the call. It takes the publisher’s legal department a month to hash out the terms of the detailed contract with your agent.…

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Steven Gaines: ‘At What Age Should a Writer Stop Writing?’

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Last week, I was in a book store when I overheard three young men in their late-twenties making fun of the photo of Tom Wolfe on the back cover of his book Back to Blood. Sacrilege. Alas, the photo was a little silly. It was typical showman Wolfe, dressed in his trademark white suit and tie, a snazzy hat in hand. He’s 84 years old now, and he looked a bit more like a geezer in a costume instead of his usual debonair self. But who cares what Tom Wolfe looks like as long as it’s another great book? “I didn’t know he was still writing,” one of the guys sniffed. “He’s too old.” Too old? For what? So, in a Larry David…

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Writer’s Bone Podcast: Novelist Marc Cameron on the Future and his Newest Tom Clancy Book

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Marc Cameron, author of the Jericho Quinn series and the recently published Tom Clancy Power and Empire, talks to Sean Tuohy about writing under a legend’s name, his “unplugged” writing process, and his future plans. Author of the New York Times bestselling Jericho Quinn Thriller series, Marc Cameron’s short stories have appeared in The Saturday Evening Post and BOYS LIFE magazine. In late 2016, he was chosen to continue the Tom Clancy Jack Ryan/Campus Thriller series. To learn more about Marc Cameron, visit his official website or like his Facebook page. Want to be a published writer? Take a look at our writing contest, where TWO Grand Prize winners will become Booktrib Contributors! Be a BookTrib Ambassador!  Sign up NOW for…

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Dawn Tripp on ‘Georgia,’ Framing Georgia O’Keeffe’s Legacy

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. Georgia O’Keeffe is one of the most remarkable artists in American history, but few know the intimate details of the woman behind the abstract masterpieces. In Georgia, author Dawn Tripp brings readers into O’Keeffe’s life and reveals the strength, ferocity, and drive this artist possessed. Earlier this year, Bookish editor Kelly Gallucci caught up with Tripp at the Newburyport Literary Festival to talk about the process of novelizing a true story, the importance of voice, and O’Keeffe’s legacy. Bookish: In most novels, the author creates the events, the timeline, the plot points. When you’re capturing a real person’s life, however, those elements are dictated to you. Was it a challenge to work within the…

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Wednesday Wisdom Amazing Tips for Writers from the Most Prolific of All Time

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People always ask me what my writing “process” is. If they knew, they wouldn’t believe me, most times it involves just sitting alone and listening to my own thoughts. Rrely does it ever involve me sitting in front of a blank screen on my computer; if I’m typing, it is already written, I am just transcribing the pages in my head. About 90 percent of what I write has been written in my dreams and that is because I spend about 90 percent of my time thinking about writing. My inspiration comes from a variety of sources, most are just random occurrences and rather than keeping my thoughts and opinions about these to myself, I share them with you. Writing…

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On Writing, Friendship and Healing: One Writer’s Journey to the Center of Self

in Non-Fiction by

I met my friend and co-writer 10 years ago. With every year that went by, our friendship quickly escalated from a simple friendship to a soulmate friendship. We talked about everything and anything and it was easy. We both felt no judgment from the other and it made us feel better knowing we had someone to lean on. We were each other’s rock. Our friendship grew stronger and stronger and as she listened to the stories of my marriage, she kept saying that these stories could become be a book and it has now become a reality. As we jotted down the things that had happened in my marriage, she was shocked that I had gone through so much. We…

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From ‘First Blood’ Until Now, David Morrell Shares His Journey

in Thrillers by

David Morrell shakes his head when someone tells him he was an overnight success. Yes, he had a book contract signed shortly after submitting his thriller, First Blood, to his agent, Henry Morrison. And within a year his fame was worldwide. Many dream, but few accomplish what he did. But his route to success was long and winding. He dedicated 12 years of his life, trying to learn to write and complete his first novel—much of it, he admits, was wasted. For eight of those years, he was a university student (undergrad and grad) and learning to write the wrong way, he says. After much rejection, he discovered he had to re-learn what he thought he already knew. It all…

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Tips You Need to Know in Time for NaNoWriMo

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It’s almost November 1st, and for thousands of writers across the world that only means one thing: it’s time for NaNoWriMo! Short for National Novel Writing Month, NaNoWriMo challenges authors to try and finish an entire novel throughout November. The goal is to produce 50,000 words by the end of the month, kick-starting the writing process in an organized and immersive way. Writing a book is never easy, and it’s certainly not any easier to cram it all into just 4 weeks. But NaNoWriMo isn’t necessarily about creating a perfect draft – it’s about making your writing a priority and finally diving headlong into a big project. The month-long event has only grown and grown over the years, swelling up…

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The Return of Bailey Weggins: Author Kate White Talks About Her Latest Book, ‘Even If It Kills Her’

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Bailey Weggins is not your typical heroine. She started out as a writer for a major women’s magazine, before becoming an amateur sleuth with a brief moment of work for a celebrity gossip publication, and then turned true crime journalist. But rather than being the tortured lead character who often thinks that the people she loves would be better off without her in their lives, Bailey is actually relatable: sometimes she makes mistakes, but she tries to put them right; she has good relationships, and people she loves. She’s smart, bold, and pretty gutsy – a character that we can not only relate to, but want to read about. Similarly, the author of the Bailey Weggins Mystery Series, Kate White,…

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Writer’s Bone Podcast: Melanie Padgett Powers Shares All: Freelancers and Journalism

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Writer’s Bone Podcast, hosted by Daniel Ford and Sean Tuohy, gives insight into the world of writing and sheds light on some of your favorite writers every week! In this episode of Friday Morning Coffee, Melanie Padgett Powers shares all. In this episode, Melanie Padgett Powers, owner of MelEdits, joins Daniel and Sean live from Chatter in Washington, D.C. to discuss a variety of subjects related to writing. Some of these include why “freelancers” need to think of themselves as small business owners, the differences between introverts and extroverts, her path from Indiana to Washington, D.C., and the current state of journalism. Melanie Padgett Powers started her career as a newspaper reporter in Indiana and grew from there. She uses…

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Creating Characters That Readers Love: 3 Tips for Writers

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Walt Gragg, author of ‘The Red Line,’ shares with us and you his tips for creating unforgettable characters readers will surely love. One of the great things about being a writer is that you get to meet so many other writers along the way. From the extremely famous to the highly obscure, the chance to interact and talk about the trade with others who are a part of this business happens for most of us at least a couple of times each year. Something you soon learn is that none of us goes about the process of creating a novel in exactly the same way. There are as many approaches to this craft as there are people writing. No one…

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‘The Last Ballad’ Author Wiley Cash Talks Writing and More

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BookTrib.com recently added Writer’s Bone to our weekly features. Daniel Ford and Sean Tuohy have been bringing us weekly podcasts of discussions they have with writers about the craft of writing and what motivates them to tell a good story.  We hope you enjoy this series as much as we do. Today on Writer’s Bone, we join Daniel Ford as he speaks to the beloved Wiley Cash, author of the new novel, The Last Ballad (which is set for release today!) Wiley Cash is also the author of other well-loved novels like A Land More Kind Than Home and This Dark Road of Mercy. They discuss some very informative subjects including how he established his storytelling work ethic, chasing Ella May’s ghost while writing The Last Ballad, what his writing students…

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Writer’s Bone: Eric Rickstad Returns with ‘The Names of Dead Girls’

in Thrillers by

 BookTrib.com recently added Writer’s Bone to our weekly features. Daniel Ford and Sean Tuohy have been bringing us weekly podcasts of discussions they have with writers about the craft of writing and what motivates them to tell a good story.  We hope you enjoy this series as much as we do.   This week’s podcast features New York Times Bestselling Author Eric Rickstad who returned to the podcast! Rick chats with Sean Tuohy about his new novel The Names of Dead Girls (out Sept. 12).   “You don’t really know what you know until you start writing.” — Eric Rickstad   “You have to reign it in and be present in your own life sometimes.”     “I’ve learned to trust my organic writing process.” BookTrib will…

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When Hollywood Comes Knocking: Turning a Thriller Into a Major TV Event

in Fiction by

Now that my military thriller The Red Line has reached the bookstores and people are becoming aware, Hollywood is working on turning it into a major television event.  Since then, I’ve been frequently asked: ‘what gives a thriller the potential to become a great movie or television series? From what I can see, the answer is actually a simple one— the same thing that makes it a novel people can’t put down. Relentless, edge-of-your-seat action and interesting, compelling characters are what draw in reader; the same will also draw in viewers. Fortunately, at least according to the critics, that’s exactly the book we’ve written.  The Red Line contains characters you fall in love with and exceptionally visual action that never stops. So we’re…

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