Tag archive

society

“Where the Crawdads Sing” Examines Isolation

in Fiction by

Just as a troop of baboons, a herd of elephants, or a pride of lions, human females tend to travel in groups, play, eat and sleep together. There are many benefits of having time in isolation, but how much is too much? Isolation can change a person, as readers can clearly see in Kya, the protagonist in Delia Owens’ first fiction work, Where the Crawdads Sing (G.P Putnam’s Sons). The character is based on many women the author knows, and we can see how being alone can have major impact on an individual through her story. Want more BookTrib? Sign up NOW for news and giveaways! In a recent conversation prior to a speech at the Fairfield (CT) Library, Owens discussed this theme…

Keep Reading

Socialite Wannabe in Amber Brock’s “Lady Be Good”

in Fiction by

In 1924, George and Ira Gershwin wrote one of their most famous songs: I am so awf’ly misunderstood So, lady be good to me. . . The heroine of Amber Brock’s Lady Be Good is indeed a misunderstood young woman, tormented by desires both frivolous and serious. Beautiful and wealthy, the only daughter of a hotelier whose money is unacceptably nouveau, Kitty Tessler devotes much of her time to figuring out how to be welcomed into New York City’s Knickerbocker crowd. Her friendship with a former schoolmate Henrietta (“Hen”) Bancroft, whose patrician family is listed in the social register, has not yielded the entrée she craves. It is 1953 and American culture and society have been upended in the postwar…

Keep Reading

‘He Never Deserved Me’: Marrying for Culture, Not Love is a Recipe for Disaster

in Nonfiction by

Sometimes, things are not exactly what they seem to be. When we were writing He Never Deserved Me, the subject came up of how I ended up marrying my husband. My best friend kept on saying that it was an arranged marriage and I would explain to her that it wasn’t. Why don’t you be the judge of that? In my society, it was understood and never questioned by anyone that a potential husband should be from a specific social class, the same as mine or higher and of the same ethnic group as me. He also had to be older than me because that meant he was financially settled and had the capabilities to support me in the way I…

Keep Reading

Wonderland: Steven Johnson on How Play Shaped the Modern World

in Nonfiction by

What you are reading now is made possible by either a computer or mobile device that connects to WiFi or a hotspot. With little thought, you may check your text messages, email and social media for updates.  None of this was possible 25 years ago as these things did not exist or were in their infancy and only afforded to the super-rich. Still, we are so dependent on these modern marvels that to be away from them, even for just a moment, is difficult. We all take the world around us— the advances and accomplishments— for granted some of the time. Of course Google is a thing, everyone knows what Google is (honestly, it’s just almost all the information in the…

Keep Reading

Julie C. Dao: ‘Women I Write Should Never, Ever Be Underestimated’

in Fiction by

BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content.  Bookshelf, bookshelf, on the wall. What is the most anticipated fall release of all? To be fair, there are quite a few. But Julie C. Dao’s Forest of a Thousand Lanterns has been at the top of our list for a while. It’s a dark fairy tale retelling that reimagines the Evil Queen from “Snow White” rising to power in a world inspired by Imperial China. To celebrate the book’s release, we chatted with Dao about writing a villain, the power of beauty, and why you should never, ever underestimate any of her female characters. Bookish: Forest of a Thousand Lanterns is a retelling/origin story for the Evil Queen from “Snow White.” Which…

Keep Reading

DIY MFA Radio Episode 134: Literature as a Reflection of Society – Interview with Dr. Sally Parry

in Potpourri by

In this week’s timely episode on DIY MFA, Gabriela Pereira interviews Dr. Sally Parry, Executive Director of the Sinclair Lewis society. They discuss Lewis’ novel It Can’t Happen Here and talk about the role of literature in activism and how books can be more than simply a reflection of society.

Keep Reading

Author Emily Schultz Answers One Question about ‘The Blondes’

in Fiction by

It’s a beautiful spring day in the city as people stroll through the parks. Families are buying fresh greens from the farmer’s market, workers are hustling up and down Main St. to get to work. All seems well and good, until every blonde woman becomes a homicidal maniac. No, seriously. Emily Schultz uses allegorical horror and dark humor to show that nothing is really as it seems in her novel, The Blondes (Picador, paperback, April 12). Named one of NPR’s Best Books of 2015, Schultz comments on social constructs placed on women, like the need to be attractive and docile to male counterparts. Because her novel has such a wild and disturbing premise, we asked Schultz where she thinks horror fits into popular culture. Here’s her thoughts: Question: While The…

Keep Reading

TED Talks: Bryan Stevenson on Identity and Injustice

in Nonfiction by

Black History Month ends in just a few days, so this week’s installment of TED Talks Tuesday is one of the most elegant examinations of race in America ever given on the TED stage. Human Rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson’s moving talk from TED 2012 paints a hard picture of America’s criminal justice framework – but he does more than illustrate the obvious problems with our current system. Stevenson urges people to become more aware of what he calls “the dark and difficult things” in today’s society, and argues that history judges societies by how they treat their most disenfranchised populations. It goes beyond the political, and moves into the realms of morality and cultural self-awareness with a grace, courage and…

Keep Reading

Introducing TED Tuesday: Amanda Palmer Discusses ‘The Art of Asking’

in Nonfiction by

Welcome to the first installment of our new weekly nugget of inspiration—TED Tuesday! Every Tuesday BookTrib will feature a TED Talk of the Week to inspire you to see the world with a new perspective. If you don’t know what TED is, stop what you’re doing right now and check out their website. TED, short for “technology, entertainment and design,” is a nonprofit organization devoted to “ideas worth spreading” by hosting annual conferences where an eclectic mix of speakers—innovators, philosophers, artists, scientists and more—discuss their experiences and share their insight. They are also affiliated with local TED talks, called TEDx conferences. Watching TED talks is a great way to get those brain juices flowing, so this week we’re featuring, “The…

Keep Reading

Go to Top