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reviews

Tall Poppy Review: “The Tiger in the House” and Kidnap

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The Tiger in the House

The Tiger in the House (Kensington Publishing) by Jacqueline Sheehan introduces Delia Lamont, who is wrapping up the last month of work at Portland, Maine’s child services agency. She’s ready to open a seaside bakery with her younger sister and start a quieter life. But first, she has one last case to deal with – a five-year-old girl was found wandering along the side of the road, partially dressed and covered in blood. Every clue leading to her family takes Delia deeper into a shadowy web of danger that includes murder, heroin trafficking, and kidnapping. Jacqueline Sheehan has crafted a story that mixes family drama with a healthy dose of suspense and takes the reader on an emotional journey they won’t…

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The Best of 2017: Booktrib’s Weekly Countdown to the End of the Year

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As the year is winding down to a close (there are only six weeks left!), we’re looking back at 2017, and everything it’s brought us. There have been some pretty crazy moments, some terrible moments, but also some great moments: Colin Kaepernick took taking a knee to a national level; we had a complete solar eclipse in the middle of August; and the first American woman won the women’s division of the NYC Marathon since 1977. These are just a few of the memorable moments from the best of 2017 that we’ve had, and that’s not even including the books. The books of 2017 have covered a variety of genres  and topics; some are older, and some brand new: Margaret Atwood’s The…

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VMA Week: Photographer Afshin Shahidi Gives BookTrib a ‘Private View’ of Icons Prince, Beyonce in an Exclusive Interview

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  One of my favorite pictures of Prince is the cover photo of Afshin Shahidi’s forthcoming book, Prince: A Private View. One of the reasons I am so enamored of this picture is due to the striking contrast of black and white in Prince’s clothing against the simplistic set— what appears to be a plain hallway. What is even more endearing to me as a 30+ year fan is that Prince, who was of a smaller stature, even in the most ordinary of spaces was ginormous. He was a larger than life figure in life and in his passing his absence has left a chasm that no artist now or in the future will be able to fill.  Through his…

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5 Back to School Feel Good Reads for the Entire Family

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Between Comic Con and the fall movie season kicking into high gear, we’ve been hearing about a lot of awesome new films lately. But one we’re especially excited about is the family film Wonder, based on the bestselling novel by R. J. Palacio. Just try to not get goosebumps from the touching trailer: The book tells the story of Auggie Pullman, a 10-year-old boy who was born with a facial anomaly. After being homeschooled all of his life, Auggie starts 5th grade at a new private school. The experience has far-reaching consequences – not just for Auggie, but for everyone in his orbit. At times, Wonder can be a tough read, forcing us to confront the anger and fear that often…

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DIY MFA: Character Relationships that Resonate with Jane Green

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This week, Gabriela Pereira interviews New York Times bestselling author Jane Green about her latest novel The Sunshine Sisters, a story with such intricate character relationships that it’s far more than a beach read. Jane Green is the author of eighteen novels, seventeen of which are New York Times bestsellers. Her novels have been published in over 25 languages, with over ten million books in print worldwide. In the past, she joined the ABC News Team to help write their first enhanced digital book about the history of Royal marriages, and then joined as a correspondent covering the wedding between Prince William and Kate Middleton. Not only has she spent her time writing books and blogs, but she has also contributed…

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Review: ‘The Underground Railroad’ is the Best Book of the Year — Maybe the Decade

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Decades before the Civil War, a slave woman named Cora risks her life and runs off a cotton plantation in Georgia. Colson Whitehead’s hero in The Underground Railroad is afraid to take a gamble on so much until she realizes she wouldn’t be risking that much to begin with. Being a slave is not a life anyone would want to live; her livelihood is no livelihood at all. In bondage, Cora merely exists. She must take that ultimate risk: liberty or death. In his novel, Whitehead successfully gets to the heart of how slavery reduces a person to a point beyond recoverable humanity with this masterful, weaving tale of America’s nefarious past. Blending history with fictional innovation, Whitehead breathes life…

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Smart Reads: Get Lost in the World of the Graphic Novel

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Back in the day growing up meant you could read books without pictures. Now some of the smartest books not only have pictures, they’re the hybrid children of literature and comic books called graphic novels. These illustrated gems can go places where no print novel is able to tread—adding cinematic wonder and visual pacing and tone to a complex narrative. There’s a huge variety out there in every genre, but we’ve picked a few of our recent favorites for this Smart Reads column that are sure to make you a fan of the art form. Agatha: The Real Life of Agatha Christie by Anne Martinetti, Guillaume Lebeau and Alexandre Franc (SelfMadeHero, May 10, 2016) “Uncovering some of the hard truths…

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Smart Reads: 6 Memoirs That Examine the Author’s Own History

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We love history here at BookTrib, which is why we featured 5 Fascinating Books that Shed a Fresh Light on History in February. But when we sat down to plan our Women’s History Month Smart Reads, we decided to take a slightly different angle. We wanted to feature women who are telling contemporary stories about their own lives. So here are six memoirs that explore family dynamics, grief and loss, redemption, reinvention, violence and peace, and that enduring thing called love. Red Eggs and Good Luck: A Memoir by Angela Lam (She Writes Press; October 6, 2015) “Red Eggs and Good Luck is the kind of honest, beautifully written memoir that will have you staying up way too late turning…

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