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Religion

‘Anatomy of a Miracle:’ Too Good to Be True?

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After returning to Biloxi, Mississippi a veteran paraplegic from a horrific event in Afghanistan, Cameron Harris lives with his sister Tanya and spends a lot of time drinking, while managing to get around in a wheelchair. From the death of his mother, to the damaging hurricane and the war, Cameron has suffered his share. But one day while waiting for Tanya in the convenience store parking lot, he just stands up and starts to walk.  Was it a miracle, or was there a medical explanation? After a Facebook post about what had taken place goes viral, the local and national media bombard Cameron with questions related to his recovery. Christians believe this was a miracle and proof of God and…

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Trailblazing Author Mike Bond Answers One Question about ‘Assassins’

in Thrillers by

Mike Bond writes with an urgency few other authors have been able to maintain. Mailer was able to do it to some degree. Tom Wolfe and Hunter Thompson had their ears to the ground. But Mike Bond has assumed this mantle for the 21st century. His writings have covered the most war-torn corners of the world to the familiar, rugged shores of Maine. Assassins (Mandevilla Press, December 8, 2016) covers a war that continues to define generations and it’s his most ambitious novel yet. With the Middle East being a melting pot of complicated strife, Bond maps a decades-long war through a military and cultural lens over several generations and characters. For our ‘One Question and Answer’ series I asked…

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Author Yann Martel Answers One Question about ‘The High Mountains of Portugal’

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When you have the opportunity to ask one question to the Man Booker Prize-winning and international bestselling author of Life of Pi, Yann Martel, you better be damn sure it isn’t a stupid one. Martel’s The High Mountains of Portugal (Random House, 2016) follows three men in three different time periods who experience the profound loss of a loved one. They explore a myriad of subject matter pertinent to and beyond their respective eras searching for comfort like philosophy and religion. Based on all of this I think I found my question for this latest installment of our ‘One Question and Answer’ series. Here’s what Martel had to say: Question: You cover a wide range of topics in The High Mountains of Portugal, not…

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Interview with Vishen Lakhiani and The Code of the Extraordinary Mind

in Non-Fiction by

PODCAST COMING SOON! What if everything we think we know about how the world works―our ideas of love, education, spirituality, work, happiness, and love―are based on Brules (bullsh*t rules) that get passed from generation to generation and are long past their expiration date? This book teaches you to think like some of the greatest non-conformist minds of our era, to question, challenge, hack, and create new rules for YOUR life so you can define success on your own terms. The Code of the Extraordinary Mind, a New York Times bestseller, is a blueprint of laws to break us free from the shackles of an ordinary life. It makes a case that everything we know about the world is shaped by…

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Anne Lamott discusses grief and forgiveness in Small Victories

in Non-Fiction by

Anne Lamott has become known for her ability to write about such diverse topics as becoming a single mother after recovering from addiction, her son as a teenaged father, the craft of writing, and her faith with openness, grace and self-deprecating humor. In the 35 years since her first book was published, Lamott—a winner of the Guggenheim Fellowship and an inductee to California’s Hall of Fame—has become one of America’s most beloved and celebrated writers. Her newest book, a collection of essays titled Small Victories: Spotting Improbable Moments of Grace (Riverhead, 2014) offers a message of hope and stories of triumph over hardship. BookTrib sat down with Lamott recently to discuss her views on the forgiveness and grief, which underscore…

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