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Paris

Previously Unpublished Hemingway Story

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Having just celebrated the 74th anniversary of the Liberation of Paris, another celebration of Paris took place earlier this month when The Strand Magazine ran a previously unpublished story by Ernest Hemingway with post-war Paris as the focal point. A Room on the Garden Side is “an earthy, poignant sketch that takes place in Hemingway’s favorite hotel in Paris, the Ritz, at the end of World War II,” writes Strand Managing Editor Andrew F. Gulli.  “The narrator, Robert (also nicknamed Papa) and a group of irregular soldiers who fought their way into the city, newly liberated from the Nazis, are due to leave Paris the next day.” The narrator, explains Gulli, is in a room chatting books, life, love, death,…

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Tara Isabella Burton’s Debut and Deadly Relationships

in Thrillers by

This year, we’ve seen a lot of books that seem to just raise the bar on what we can expect from literature in terms of mesmerizing plots, spellbinding characters and twists no one ever saw coming. But debut novel Social Creature, with its eye-catching cover that stops you in your tracks may just have raised the bar above all the others. Equally hypnotic and provocative, the novel focuses on the friendship between two women: Louise living on her own, barely making rent with no real relationships with anyone, not even her own family; and Lavinia, living in an apartment on the Upper East Side, funded by her parents, and taking part in everything the high life in New York has to offer.…

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Liam Callanan on Bookstores, Travel and Magic of Paris

in Fiction by

Who doesn’t love Paris? Whether it’s the language, the culture, the food, or just that element of je ne sais quoi, there’s something magnetic about the city. With so many different words that could be used, it’s telling that perhaps the most common word to describe the city is magic. And no one, it seems, understands that better than author Liam Callanan. His latest novel, Paris by the Book (Dutton), is set in city and thoroughly explores the ways that Paris not only changes you, but allows you to change within it. When Leah’s husband disappears, leaving behind only airplane tickets to Paris for her and their two daughters, Leah makes a spur of the moment decision and puts them all on the plane. There,…

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Review: ‘The Waters & The Wild’ is a Stunning Exploration of Human Character

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Daniel Abend lives a comfortable life as a successful psychotherapist on the Upper West Side of New York City. He is a single father raising a teenage daughter. When one of his patients commits suicide Daniel receives a note that has him start to ask questions about his patient’s death. Provided with a mysterious set of clues in the form of an old key, a haunting photograph and a veiled poem, Daniel is left struggling to solve the mystery before him. But suddenly, his daughter disappears. In a desperate search for his daughter and the truth, Daniel finds himself swept back to when he was a young man living in Paris. As each day passes, the trail gets colder and…

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Seduced by Trotsky’s Assassin: John P. Davidson tells the inside story

in Non-Fiction by

Paris, 1938. A young social worker from Brooklyn, Sylvia Ageloff was in the French capitol to study the language. And as a member of Leon Trotsky’s inner circle, she was also an American delegate to an organizational meeting of the Russian revolutionary’s followers. And, marked by Josef Stalin’s secret agents, Sylvia was about to become a pawn in the plot to kill Trotsky, as John P. Davidson depicts in The Obedient Assassin: A Novel Based on a True Story (Delphinium Press, February 2014). Bookish, bespectacled, and Jewish, Sylvia was swept off her feet by a handsome, mysterious aristocrat. “She fell in love,” says Davidson, “and because she was in love, she missed clue after clue, and turned a blind eye…

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Writer’s Bone Podcast: A Talk with Diane Ratican, Author of ‘Why LA? Pourquoi Paris?’

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Writer’s Bone Podcast, hosted by Daniel Ford and Sean Tuohy, gives insight into the world of writing and sheds light on some of your favorite writers every week! Diane Ratican, author of Why LA? Pourquoi Paris?, talks to Daniel Ford about what she loves most about Los Angeles and Paris, the gems her research process uncovered, and where the Writer’s Bone crew can find a good cup of coffee in both cities. Diane Ratican, educated at University of California Berkeley in History and Sociology, then at UCLA with a Masters in Sociology and Education, started her career educating gifted children, and then moved on to become a risk-taking entrepreneur. This background uniquely prepared her to engage in this latest endeavor,…

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A Life in Books: Author Kathleen Hill Talks About the Power of Words and Writing Her New Book

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Before I spoke with Kathleen Hill for the first time, I had been talking with a friend about aging and watching the adults in our lives, some who’ve passed away, struggle with memory in their later years. We were both saying how we wished they had written down some of the stories of their lives, memories of events that would have given us and our children a bit more insight into family histories and reveal how certain events in the lives of those who are connected to our pasts ultimately impact who we are in the present. So we both committed to writing our own memoirs. I became keenly aware, early in the process, that everything I wrote was linked…

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Pauline Lévêque and Florence Mars: The Culture of Raising Children

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If you lived abroad for an extended period, even simply during a semester off while in college, you know that cultures are nothing alike. There is as much in common between Russian and Portuguese bread than between a whale and a tiger. That is what gives the world its colors and texture. There has been a bevy of books about raising children in foreign countries of late. France and Paris seem to be the major targets of this topic. A mother forced to live abroad because her husband’s multi-national has relocated the family to a distant land or simply a single mom in search of new adventures learn quickly that, in France, things are not quite the same as in…

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Video: Missed It? Interview with Leslie Meier, Author of French Pastry Murder

in Fiction by

  We have a FRENCH PASTRY MURDER on our hands! (Book 21 in the Lucy Stone Mystery series by Leslie Meier) ABOUT FRENCH PASTRY MURDER Tinker’s Cove is abuzz with excitement when Norah, the queen of daytime TV, comes to town and selects Lucy and her pals to be featured in her “Women Who Make a Difference” episode. In recognition for their charitable work, the ladies and their husbands are awarded a dream vacation in Paris, complete with classes at Le Cooking School with renowned pastry chef Larry Bruneau. But their bon voyage is cut short when Lucy discovers the chef in a pool of blood on the second day of class… If she’s going to enjoy her vacation, she’ll…

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What would Hemingway eat? A menu for a Moveable Feast

in Fiction by

I realized, as I worked my way through Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast, that he titled it so because his time in Paris was an ongoing banquet of social activities, incessant writing, and literal feasting and imbibing from one café to the next. It was also most apparent to me that, though he had already fallen into the arms of another woman when he wrote this memoir, he had truly loved his first wife, Hadley. Regret filters through when he speaks of their tender years together. So much so that I wondered if writing it could have been his way of telling her of his regret. But above all, as a gastronaut, I found the descriptions of food and drink…

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Springtime (and sex!) in Paris

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Springtime—which we all have to believe is approaching—is a good time to go to Paris and fall in love. And of course the next best thing to traveling to the City of Love is to read about someone else’s life there. Whether you’re looking ahead to your own trip, or hoping to live vicariously, we’ve found two new memoirs that should satisfy your craving for all things French. In Inside a Pearl (Bloomsbury, February), author Edmund White shares stories from the fifteen years he spent living in Paris starting in the early 1980s. White—a prolific author of fiction, memoir, and nonfiction, and a cultural critic—was already a well-known writer and interpreter of gay culture when he moved abroad, and his…

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What’s a Parisian maman-to-be to do? Cara Black on Paris and motherhood

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by Cara Black It’s never easy for Parisienne Aimée Leduc, especially with a baby bump in the humid summer when World Cup Fever overtakes Paris in 1998. Not only is Aimée attracted to bad boys, her ankles swell and she’s scaling down to kitten heels instead of her Louboutins. Then there are her cravings for cornichons and kiwis and finding the perfect crème to prevent stretch marks. What’s a Parisian maman-to-be to do? Like many in her condition, it’s time to think ahead to balancing a bébe, work, and how to childproof a 17th-century apartment with archaic plumbing, and electricity last updated at the turn of the 1900s. Time for her find another place to store her Glock—she’s a licensed…

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