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Mysteries & Thrillers

Whodunit? These Brash publishers solve the mystery of the great crime thriller

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Two authors-turned-book publishers are poised to shock mystery fans the world over when Brash Books, a company specializing in mysteries, police procedurals, thrillers and spy novels launches in September. The company is the brainchild of Lee Goldberg, a writer and producer of many successful television series and the author of more than 40 books; and Joel Goldman, a former trial attorney who went on to write a number of highly successful and award-winning thriller book series. Before founding Brash Books, the two had enjoyed success in self-publishing original and backlist titles for years. “We both entered the self-publishing arena about the same time,” said Goldberg, “and between the two of us over the last 3-4 years, we’ve sold about 800,000…

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The case for place: fall mystery reads where location is key

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Now that summer’s over, it’s a good time to catch up—courtesy of a great new mystery or thriller—on all that traveling you never got around to. BookTrib has sifted through the plethora of fall books and chosen four featuring fascinating locales, be they a broken-down Detroit, a World War II-era Los Angeles or an English seaside village. When you’re finished with these must-reads, you might be less likely to kick at a pile of autumn leaves during your travels—there could be a corpse underneath. Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes (Mulholland, Sept. 16. 2014) Set in a contemporary, crumbling Detroit, Beukes’s fourth novel (following her breakout 2013 hit The Shining Girls) plunges readers into a terrifying mix of crime and the…

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Kira Peikoff discusses how a life-changing event inspired her latest novel

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When I was 7 years old, my father had a heart attack. Not one that killed him, thank God. He was rushed to the hospital in time for doctors to clear his blocked artery. No one was all that surprised. My dad had smoked three packs a day for 30 years—that’s over 650,000 cigarettes—before quitting. Even though he’d stopped long before I was born, the damage to his body increased his risk for another heart attack, especially as he aged. And therein lies the rub: My dad’s the oldest dad around. He was born in 1933, the same year Hitler came to power. He’s of the same generation of most of my friends’ grandparents. I wasn’t too aware of this…

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Christopher Brookmyre on sinking or swimming with titles

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by Christopher Brookmyre For the first time in my career, I find myself having to publish a novel in the US under a title different to the original. Bred in the Bone, the third book in my Jasmine Sharp trilogy (after Where the Bodies are Buried and When the Devil Drives), was published in the UK under the title Flesh Wounds, but an alternative was required by Grove Atlantic because they already have a novel of that name on their list. This is a relatively rare problem for me, and when you consider that my previous novels have included Attack of the Unsinkable Rubber Ducks, One Fine Day in the Middle of the Night and A Big Boy Did It…

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Video: Missed It? Live Interview with Andrew Gross, Author of Everything to Lose

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  “The reader will develop an emotional attachment to the heroine and hope she finds a way to save herself…very clever.” — RT Book Reviews   “Heart-stopping climax.”  — Publishers Weeky    “Andy Gross is a master of no-nonsense, good, old-fashioned suspense” —  Steve Berry, New York Times bestselling author   “If there are tricks of the trade, Gross has learned them all. He writes with seeming ease, offering no fancy stylistic tics, no overwrought prose, no melodrama, just a menacing tale with effective twists, perfect pacing, intriguing characters, and heart-gripping suspense.” —  Library Journal ANDREW GROSS is the author of New York Times bestsellers Reckless, The Blue Zone, The Dark Tide, Don’t Look Twice, Eyes Wide Open, 15 Seconds…

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Dreaming of kidnapping: Hilary Davidson’s BLOOD ALWAYS TELLS

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I must confess: I have a strange relationship with kidnapping stories. In my teens there was this author who wrote a series of novels involving a series of pretty (but still accessibly clumsy or insecure) women who often found themselves whisked away against their will by dark, dangerous (but still ruggedly handsome) men. I don’t want to spoil it for you, but they all ended up in love. Every. Single. One of them. And man, did I eat these novels up. I tore through them, one after another. I couldn’t get enough. It never once occurred to me that being taken by force was maybe not the best way to start a romantic relationship. Then I went to college and…

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Tragic loss, which most everyone has endured, has haunted Rick Mofina’s fiction

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By Rick Mofina Some of the most heartbreaking moments I’ve ever faced were during the years I worked as a news reporter. I was often parachuted into the lives of people at the most difficult times in their lives. I’ll never forget a grieving mother showing the press a postage-stamp-sized school photo of her son taken the day before he was killed in a hit-and-run accident. And I’ll always remember interviewing a mother hours after she’d watched her toddler daughter get run over by a car. She told me her faith would help her, that her little girl had chased a butterfly onto the road, that God was calling her. Tragic loss, which most everyone has endured, has haunted my…

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A scandalous mystery that rocked the nation in 1930

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For most of us, February means the last pass through winter, highlighted by Groundhog Day, the Superbowl, and Valentine’s Day. But otherwise, as C.S. Lewis said, “Always winter but never Christmas.” So how can we beat the winter blues that inevitably set in this time of year? With a great story. And at She Reads this month, we’ve got one for you, and by one of our own no less! THE WIFE, THE MAID, AND THE MISTRESS is a romp through New York in 1930. Populated by gangsters and crooked politicians, society ladies and dancers, this story is nothing like your day-to-day life and yet… you will find the three women mentioned in the title strangely recognizable. At the center of this book…

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Spinning whale vomit into gold

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by Elisabeth Elo The first seed of North of Boston was planted when I read an article about ambergris – whale excrement or vomit that floats in the sun, washes up on beaches, and eventually becomes a substance that was highly prized in ancient times for its healing and aphrodisiac qualities and that was—and in some cases, still is—used as a base of perfumes.  I loved the paradox, the fusion of opposites.  To think that something so disposable could be transformed through natural processes into something so valued.  Yet its essence was the same. It reminds me of the fairytale Rumpelstiltskin. (I digress, I know, but isn’t that a writer’s prerogative?)  The heroine is given the impossible task of spinning…

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THE NEVER LIST – It Will Have You Turning Pages Late Into The Night

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“As gripping as last summer’s Gone Girl—but darker, and with an eerie timeliness—Koethi Zan’s debut novel . . . is this year’s edge-of-your-towel beach reach.” —Elle “This fast-paced, disturbing thriller boasts a chilling premise as well as a layered first-person narrative full of shocking twists and turns.” —Library Journal “Zan’s first novel is a haunting depiction of the emotional scars left on women held in captivity.” —Kirkus “It will have you turning pages late into the night.” —BookTrib Review Crew, Mary H. Ward When Sarah and Jennifer were young, Jennifer’s mother is killed in a car accident. She grows up with a father that ends up in prison and moves in with Sarah and her family. Sarah and Jennifer create The…

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