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New ‘A Wrinkle in Time’ Trailer is Meg-nificent

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During the American Music Awards on November 19th, Disney debuted the second trailer for the upcoming movie of Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time. Like our first look at the film, this latest trailer highlights the battle of light vs. darkness that young Meg Murry (Storm Reid) is thrust into while trying to find her absent father. This time around, we also get to hear more from Meg herself and see her fantastic brain and heart in action. RELATED: The Re-Read: A Wrinkle in Time A Wrinkle in Time looks aesthetically stunning, and I’m confident that the movie, like the book, will help young girls realize they can be capable heroes like Meg — always a nice change of pace…

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Disney Pixar’s ‘Coco,’ Not Just for Kids

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For the past few years, Disney has been turning our favorite classic stories into live-action films.  These revivals remind us that sometimes, kids movies aren’t just for kids. In theaters this holiday season is Disney Pixar’s Coco, a beautifully animated film that takes place in Mexico. Lucky for us, the companion book Coco: A Story about Music, Shoes, and Family, has been released for us, as well! Twelve-year old Miguel Rivera just wants to be a famous musician, like his idol Ernesto de la Cruz, the most famous musician and film star in Mexico’s history. But Miguel’s family has a generation-old ban on music, and tell him to focus on the shoe-making shop that family runs, instead. A desperate attempt to prove his musical…

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The Books Are Better: ‘Snowden’ is a Failure, at Least by Oliver Stone’s Standards

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Who would have thought that Oliver Stone would play it safe? I certainly wouldn’t think the JFK and Platoon helmsman would decide to pull back when exploring one of the most important stories of the early 21st century regarding our privacy. But I’m here to tell you, Stone played it too close to the vest. Snowden stars the multifaceted Joseph Gordon-Levitt as the titular Edward Snowden, who at his personal expense exposed how the National Security Agency is able to spy on anyone with a cell phone or internet connection. Many historians think this revelation was more impactful than Daniel Ellsburg’s ‘Pentagon Papers’ revealing the impending failure of the Vietnam War. The movie is based on two books, The Snowden Files (Vintage, 2014) by…

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Live Interview with Laurie Kahn and Love Between the Covers

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PULLING BACK THE COVERS ON A BILLION DOLLAR INDUSTRY About the Film Love stories are universal. Love stories are powerful. And so are the women who write them. Love Between the Covers is the fascinating story of the vast, funny, and savvy female community that has built a powerhouse industry sharing love stories. Romance fiction is sold in 34 languages on six continents, and the genre grosses more than a billion dollars a year — outselling mystery, sci-fi, and fantasy combined. Yet the millions of voracious women (and sometimes men) who read, write, and love romance novels have remained oddly invisible. Until now. For three years, we follow the lives of five very diverse published romance authors and one unpublished…

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5 Incredible Documentaries to Watch on Netflix Right Now

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We love documentaries. Too often seen as the intellectual nerd of the film world, documentaries have been getting wedgies from the spy and superhero flicks for too long. Not on our watch! Documentaries have a mesmerizing power to open minds to new ideas and fresh ways of viewing the familiar. While their subject matter falls under non-fiction, the range of emotions and ideas they explore are as wide—or perhaps even wider—than film fiction. To get you started, here are five documentaries worth watching on Netflix right now. Tell the superdudes to take the night off. Bill Cunningham New York follows Bill Cunningham, the acclaimed yet inconspicuous New York City fashion-photographer, as he rides his bicycle through the streets of the…

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The Night Ends on Elm Street

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I was 5 years old and a man with knives for fingers was telling me to go to hell. But it wasn’t Freddy Krueger – it was my mom’s boyfriend Tim. I’d been woken from a dead sleep in an attempt to terrify me with a reference I neither understood nor appreciated. But that wasn’t the last time Wes Craven’s monsters would invade my cultural landscape. Years later I was home alone on a stormy night when the power cut out. Being from the South (land of actual storms), I was pretty used to this sort of thing and gave it only a passing thought. I was less composed, however, when my cell rang and the raspy voice at the…

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The Cold War Returns in the Man from U.N.C.L.E.

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Ever find yourself pining for the simpler time of the Cold War? Ah, those were the days. There were only two sides: Them vs. Us. Good vs. Evil. Spy vs. Spy. So there’s good news for those of you who liked your war cold: This week (which happens to mark the 54th anniversary of the construction of the Berlin Wall), The Man From U.N.C.L.E hits the big screen. And while the movie—a remake of the popular 1960s TV show—may not be an accurate representation of the world of professional espionage, it does represent a throwback to an era when spies were cool; their martinis were shaken, not stirred; and they all came equipped with awesome gadgets to help them foil…

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Get Your Paper Towns Fix With These Road Trip Reads

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I’m a little bit of a John Green junkie. His quick, witty writing style sucked me in at Looking for Alaska and I haven’t looked back since. Which is why I’m so excited for the movie adaptation of Paper Towns, out July 24th: The movie promises to capture the mysterious, playful feel of the novel, as we follow Quentin on his search for Margo after spending one perfect night together. The story turns into a pretty epic road trip as he searches for clues, and eventually has to confront the reality of the girl-next-door. As far back as On the Road, by Jack Kerouac, road trip novels have become synonymous with coming-of-age tales. There’s just something about a long stretch…

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The Girl in the Spider’s Web Plot Details Revealed

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You know, years later, I’m still wondering how Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo became as popular as it did. But, unlike my usual ponderings on popularity (à la: 50 Shades of Crap), The Millennium Series’ rise to fame baffles me because it’s actually quite good. And, as a contrarian, underground, pseudo-pre-hipster-type guy, I’m not used to things I like being all that popular. But Larsson pulled it off somehow and was, reportedly, prepared to keep pulling it off for at least seven more novels past The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest (2007) before he died unexpectedly of a heart attack in 2004. A lot of people thought the series was as dead as Henrik Vanger, but on…

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