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#MeToo

Sarah Jessica Parker On Her Imprint and Empowering Women

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Sarah Jessica Parker who is best known for her iconic role as Carrie Bradshaw is also a producer, designer, and now a publisher, recently launching her own imprint, SJP for Hogarth. In a rare and revealing interview, the Sex and the City star opens up to Roxanne on several hot topics. They discuss not only the imprint, but the series’ impact on the role of women in society, the importance of pay equality for working mothers, and recent movements #MeToo and #TimesUp. Roxanne and SJP were delighted to discover that they had several book interests in common, even swapping book recommendations. Parker says her mother instilled in her the valuable habit of reading at a young age. “You couldn’t leave the house without something…

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Holly Brown’s Strong Female Overcomes Toxic Workplace

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Holly Brown’s ‘How Far She’s Come’  tells the timely story of Cheyenne, a woman with a history of sexual harassment chasing her dream to work at the Independent News Network. To her delight, she is able to secure a job broadcasting for the network. However, to her horror, the modern professional veneer of the network starts to quickly disappear as she is once again subjugated to harassment from her peers. Even more unsettling, a diary is left as a warning for Cheyenne by a previous female broadcaster. As it becomes apparent that Cheyenne is being manipulated into events similar to those in the diary, she must change the power dynamics in a toxic workplace to show everyone she will not…

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Morgan Jerkins’ ‘This Will Be My Undoing’ is Timely Portrait of Womanhood in America

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This year, books pertaining to race, gender, sexuality and feminism are paving the way for some interesting discussions and perspectives on how we view human life in America. One of the most prolific of these to be released this year is Morgan Jerkins’ debut, This Will Be My Undoing: Living at the Intersection of Black, Female, and Feminist in (White) America. Jerkins’ collection of essays is a timely discourse on the treatment and experiences of Black women in this country. Named as the “one of the Most Anticipated Books of 2018” by Esquire, Elle, and Vogue, Jerkins’ book contains a collection of essays regarding topics such as feminism, misogyny, Black history and pop culture. The main question Jerkins answers in her…

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Our ‘Favorite Thing’ About Oprah: Her Love of Books!

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On Sunday night at the Golden Globes, Oprah Winfrey became the first black woman to accept the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement. Her speech not only brought the entire room to their feet, but it was also one of solidarity, giving validation and hope to those who’ve tried to speak and were shut down. While most of the press is talking about a potential Oprah 2020 presidential campaign, here at BookTrib we are talking about the woman and her love of literature! The Original Oprah’s Book Club launched in 1996, and ran for 15 years, ending in 2011— right before the final episode of The Oprah Winfrey Show and the launch of Oprah’s Book Club 2.0, the digital…

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Q&A with David Plante, Author of ‘American Stranger’ and ‘Difficult Women’

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Brought up in a secularized Jewish household on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, Nancy Green knows little about her parents’ past. She knows they were World War II Jewish refugees who were able to escape Germany with precious family heirlooms that are constant reminders of a lost life and a world about which Nancy knows very little. In David Plante’s novel, American Stranger, (Delphinium Books; January 9, 2018) the main character, Nancy, has a longing for some kind of spiritual connection that first leads her into an encounter with a Hasidic Jewish man who, unable to find meaning in his own religion, has taken vows to become a monk. She then becomes romantically involved with Yvon, a Catholic college student in…

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The Gift of Gab: How Actress Gabrielle Union’s First Book Inspired Conversations across College Campuses

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Recently, hashtags such as #MeToo have sparked conversation and allowed sexual assault survivors to stand in solidarity with one another and share their experiences without shame. Last month, college students from schools in the Atlanta University Center (AUC)— which houses Spelman College, Morehouse College and Clark Atlanta University, created the hashtag #WeKnowWhatYouDid to bring attention to rape in the AUC and call out those who got away assaulting other students. The hashtag started after several students posted the names of alleged rapists across the three campuses in hopes of forcing AUC administrators to take action against the accused.  Signs bearing the phrases, “No More Secrets,” “Morehouse Protects Rapists” and “Spelman Protects Rapists” were also posted, but were later removed by campus police. Rape and assault at…

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The Silence Breakers: 5 Books Inspired by Time’s Person of the Year

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The 2017 Time Person of the Year was announced last week and it could not have gone to anyone more deserving: the silence breakers. For the past few months, more and more women (and men!) have come forward, sharing their stories of sexual harassment and assault at the hands of some of the most powerful men in our culture. From politicians to movie producers, these people have continually used their power and clout in ways that pressured and compromised those less powerful than them. In the past, women and men who came forward have been shunned, ignored or silenced. But this year, they’ve managed to start a revolution, unseating men from the most prestigious positions and demanding that they be…

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