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Ike and Kay a World War II Passionate Love Affair

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There are some stories we hear and dismiss as just rumor… and then there are others that are too good to ignore. This is exactly what led critically acclaimed historical fiction author James MacManus to discover the incredible story of the love affair between Dwight Eisenhower and Kay Summersby, his wartime aide and driver. Ike and Kay (Overlook Press) sees a love story between two people amid the carnage and the horrors of the Second World War in Europe and North Africa. The affair between Eisenhower and Summersby was fragile but passionate, made stronger by the support she offered to him throughout the difficulties of war.  Though Eisenhower returned to his wife, there’s no doubting they were genuinely in love.…

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Pretty Little Liars’ Sara Shepard on Her Latest Adult Thriller, “The Elizas”

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One of the books at the top of our must-read list for this year was The Elizas (Atria Books), which just seemed to have every element you want out of a thriller: a narrator who isn’t quite sure what’s going on but whom no one will believe; a case of identity confusion; a beautiful location; and last, but perhaps most important, a writer who really knows what she’s doing. Sara Shepard has a talent for writing some of the most complex and layered plots to ever hit the page, but she does so with what seems like little to no effort, and manages to explain everything out in the end in a way that has you berating yourself for not seeing it before.…

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Ten’s Gretchen McNeil: How to Make Serial Killers Fun

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Gretchen McNeil is not only an incredibly talented author, she’s also a professionally trained opera singer, a natural performer, and one of the nicest people we’ve ever met. The hit YA author is probably best known for her book Ten, which won numerous awards before being turned into a Lifetime original movie. Then, just to cement her place in our hearts as the reigning queen of YA horror, she came out with with the two book Don’t Get Mad series, with Get Even being released in 2014, and the follow-up Get Dirty in 2015. Now, she’s back with a new YA horror novel, #MurderTrending. But this one’s doing something new, which is showcasing McNeil’s natural affinity for comedy. While we all know that comedy and horror together can…

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Caged: A Serial Killer Novel With a Difference

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Caged is not your typical serial killer novel. “A few years ago,” says Ellison Cooper, “I was looking for something to read and jokingly told my partner that I wished there were a crime thriller that incorporated neurology, archaeology, and dogs. It was like being struck by lightning. I couldn’t boot up my computer fast enough.” The book features an FBI Special Agent named Sayer Altair, a woman with the FBI’s Critical Incident Response Group, responsible for investigating such events as school shootings, random gunmen, and serial killings. But her interest in the latter is very particular – she is also a neuroscientist studying the neurology of violence. Is it possible to pinpoint something specific in the brain? Is there any way to predict…

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Riley Sager on Summer Camp and Stephen King

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Last year, there was one book at the top of everyone’s must-read list: Riley Sager’s Final Girls, which was so good, Stephen King himself called it “The first great thriller of 2017.” If that’s not proof enough that Sager knows his way around the thriller, then just know that his follow up to Final Girls has been lauded by the likes of The Woman in the Window‘s A.J. Finn, The Last Mrs. Parrish‘s Liv Constantine and The Perfect Stranger‘s Megan Miranda, just to name a few. The Last Time I Lied, Sager’s latest novel, was just released today, so make sure to carve out some time for yourself so you can head down to your local bookstore to pick up a copy. Not only does The Last Time I…

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Tara Isabella Burton’s Debut and Deadly Relationships

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This year, we’ve seen a lot of books that seem to just raise the bar on what we can expect from literature in terms of mesmerizing plots, spellbinding characters and twists no one ever saw coming. But debut novel Social Creature, with its eye-catching cover that stops you in your tracks may just have raised the bar above all the others. Equally hypnotic and provocative, the novel focuses on the friendship between two women: Louise living on her own, barely making rent with no real relationships with anyone, not even her own family; and Lavinia, living in an apartment on the Upper East Side, funded by her parents, and taking part in everything the high life in New York has to offer.…

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Sarah MacLean on Wickedly Weaving Scandal & Privilege

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. If you’re looking for an addicting summer read, you can’t go wrong with Sarah MacLean’s Wicked and the Wallflower, the first book in her Bareknuckle Bastards series. The story follows the electric romance between Lady Felicity Faircloth, who is trying to recover from a recent scandal, and Devil, who hopes to use Felicity to get revenge on his brother. This is one of our top romance picks of the season, so we were delighted to have the opportunity to sit down with MacLean to talk about this exciting new series. Here MacLean shares how James Joyce inspired the book’s theme of consent, and her plans for smuggling booze into 19th-century London. Bookish: Lady Felicity Faircloth appeared in The Day…

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Debut Authors Amy Brewer and Patty Carothers on Collaboration and Writing a Happy Ending

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Rarely nowadays do we find books in the Young Adult genre that aren’t filled with death, murder, bullying, depression, and more. While books with these themes do hold an important place in literature, the market, after the success of books like 13 Reasons Why, has become saturated – if not over-saturated – with similar narratives and themes. Which is why reading the debut novel of friends and writing collaborators Patty Carothers and Amy Brewer feels like something of a breath of fresh air. Their debut work, Texting Prince Charming, as hinted at in the title, reads like a fairy tale – with a twist. After a tragic car accident, Shelby Ryan lost more than just her entire family – she’s also left…

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Harwood-Jones’ Journey Filled With LGBTQ Life Lessons

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Happy Pride Month! June was chosen as Pride Month to celebrate and commemorate the Stonewall riots in 1969, when the police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar, and sparked what turned into days of clashes and riots between the police, and members of the LGBTQAI community. The riots are largely considered to have been the defining moment that brought the fight for gay rights into the modern era. Pride parades, first started in 1970, the year after the riots, now take place across the world. Because at BookTrib we’re all about books and literature, we have one of our favorite interviews to share with you this month! Markus Harwood-Jones is coming out with two companion books this August: Romeo for…

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Interview with Maxine Rosaler, Author of “Queen for a Day”

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It is bold work to invite us into the world of children who are eligible for special education—and their long suffering parents. Maxine Rosaler does this in her novel, Queen for a Day, through her main character, Mimi Slavitt and her young son, Danny. We, the audience, are alongside Mimi as she attempts to accept and comprehend her autistic son’s world. In the process, Mimi — and so we the readers — are introduced to the other mothers and their children, whom she encounters along the path, and the social system that provides aid. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2015-2016, 6.7 million students between the ages of three and 21 received special education services. Among the…

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Sally Koslow on Fitzgerald’s Love Affair with Sheilah Graham in Her New Book, “Another Side of Paradise”

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It is always intriguing when an author shifts genres and offers us something very different – especially when the latest project captures our attention immediately and we declare ourselves followers of the writer. Sally Koslow, having written popular novels including The Late, Lamented Molly Marx, The Widow Waltz and Little Pink Slips that take place in real time, falls into this category. With the release of her first historical fiction novel Another Side of Paradise, Koslow engages her readers, drawing us into a memorable time in America for romance and female agency. From the moment we open this new work, we are transported into the life of Sheilah Graham, a woman born into poverty in England at the turn of the 20th…

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Joanna Cantor on Her Debut Novel, Yoga, and Writing About Grief

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This year, we’ve had some pretty standout books that have been published across the genres, but debut author Joanna Cantor’s novel Alternative Remedies For Loss has become one of the most talked about and beloved books, even though it was released just a few weeks ago. Though this is her debut, Cantor’s novel actually tackles some of the hardest things to write about clearly: the contradiction of life in your early 20s, where everything seems to be standing still yet happening too fast and all at once; grief and the feeling of permanent loss; and recovery, acceptance of our lives the way they are. And she manages to do all this effortlessly. Alternative Remedies For Loss focuses on 22-year-old Olivia, who, when…

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Jeremy Finley Debut Journeys into the Unimaginable

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Jeremy Finley is a hard-nosed professional. As the chief investigative reporter for the NBC-affiliated television station in Nashville, he’s spent more than 15 years exposing corruption, financial abuse, and criminal activity, and won some of the highest honors in journalism, including multiple Emmys, Edward R. Murrow awards, and IRE (Investigative Reporters and Editors) awards. It’s also led him down some very unexpected paths: “My day job is so rooted in proof – in verifying facts and seeking documentation of everything – I’m a bit obsessed that we still haven’t been able to come to a true conclusion about alien abductions and strange lights in the sky. And the Loch Ness monster. And Bigfoot. This is why I don’t sleep at…

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Charlie Donlea’s Fictional Answer to Crime Docu-Dramas

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Over the past few years, podcasts and television shows like Serial and Netflix’s Making A Murderer have taken over the country, if not the world. Thousands of people tune in every day to find out what happened next in these real-life cases where the question of did they or didn’t they pervades throughout the entire trial and beyond. Now, in a thriller unlike any other out there, Charlie Donlea has provided us with the book we didn’t even know we could have. Don’t Believe It is basically the literary answer to those true crime dramas: Sidney Ryan is a filmmaker, whose on-going docu-drama The Girl of Sugar Beach has taken over the country. Ten years previous in St. Lucia, Grace Sebold was arrested and convicted…

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Comic Thriller “Death and Taxes” Pits an IRS Repo Squad Against the Mongolian Mob, Radioactive Cows and a Murderous Eunuch

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Mark Douglas is an IRS accountant, a former Marine content to hide out in his cubicle and audit suspicious tax returns. His latent thirst for action is satisfied by occasional forays into the field, armed with tear gas, a bull horn, and a rental truck to haul in whatever pays the back taxes of the most egregious evaders. Life is good for Mark. After long days at the office courting carpal tunnel syndrome, he joins his co-workers at their local watering hole to relive past glories deciphering fraudulent tax returns, ponder unexpected consequences of tax loopholes, and ogle busty barmaids. Mark’s boss, Lila, is a beautiful and sexy tax prodigy. One day, she discovers “odd jiggles” in three seemingly unconnected…

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Maurene Goo Dishes on Food Trucks, Frenemies, and The Way You Make Me Feel

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. Maurene Goo’s The Way You Make Me Feel contains all of the perfect ingredients for a great summer read. There’s a blossoming romance, a heartfelt enemies-to-frenemies-to-bffs plot, and it’s all centered around a food truck whose menu will leave your mouth watering. Here, we chat with Goo about her favorite literary friendships, her love of Los Angeles, and the surprising character readers are crushing on. Bookish: In many ways, this book is a love letter to Los Angeles—the food, the people, the culture, the music. How have your own experiences growing up and living in LA influenced your writing? Maurene Goo: A lot of reviews of my books mention the “natural diversity” of my characters and this is…

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