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Immigration

BookTrib Q&A: Contemplating Immigration and Morality with Acclaimed Author Ayelet Gundar-Goshen

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When Ayelet Gundar-Goshen, the Israeli author, screenwriter and psychologist first published One Night, Markovitch a few years ago, it was one of the most compelling works of literature to be translated from Hebrew into 13 different languages. Now, with her latest novel, Waking Lions, Gundar-Goshen brings readers another compelling story, this time about Dr. Eitan Green, an Israeli doctor who, while speeding at night in his SUV on a deserted road, fatally wounds a refugee with his car. What happens next is something we all hope never to deal with: how to react in a crisis where one decision can mean life or death for ourselves or another. The doctor chooses to leave the body, and pretend it never happened, but when the…

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Review: Xhenet Aliu’s ‘Brass’ is Absolutely Fearless

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We all know that reading offers an escape, whether that escape is to explore different worlds and cultures, or just to get away from your job for a few hours. But there are some books out there that juts perfectly embody our sense of wanderlust and Brass, by Xhenet Aliu is one of them. Beautifully written, Brass encompasses the personal, if at times painful bonds between mothers and daughters, while capturing the longing of wanting to leave home and explore the world. As a waitress at a diner in Waterbury, Connecticut, Elsie has big dreams of getting out and hopes that the tips she makes will be enough to do that. In the meantime, she starts getting to know Bashkim, the married line-order cook,…

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‘Odd Child Out’: A BookTrib Conversation with Gilly MacMillan

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The saying “art imitates life” rings true in particular for Gilly MacMillan’s detective thriller, Odd Child Out. Her latest novel has the heavy matter of dealing with immigration and refugees, two subjects that are heavily featured in politics and the news across the globe on a daily basis. Yet, MacMillan takes these controversial topics home, having them play out in the friendship between two boys. Students of one of Bristol’s elite private schools, Noah and Abdi are inseparable, best friends since day one. They share a love of the same things, despite their wildly different backgrounds: one is the son of a photographer, with a privileged upbringing, and the other is a refugee from Somalia, attending school on a scholarship. But then…

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‘A Nation of Immigrants’: The International Emmys Shines a Spotlight on Immigration in America

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“No human being is illegal. That is a contradiction in terms. Human beings can be beautiful, they can be right or wrong, but illegal? How can a human being be illegal?” ~Elie Wiesel, Nobel Prize winner, Holocaust survivor, Author of Night  and Presenter at the 28th Emmy Awards The International Emmys will take place this year in November with Maz Jobrani hosting. Jobrani is a comedian whose new special Immigration premiered on Netflix in August. He is one of many in entertainment to draw attention to the plight of immigrants in our country. Entertainers such as Daddy Yankee, Demi Lovato, and Khalid have lent their voices in support of immigrants, as have a number of writers. With DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals)…

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DIY MFA Radio Episode 132: Capturing Diverse Experiences on the Page — Interview with Shanthi Sekaran

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This week Gabriela Pereira interviews Shanthi Sekaran about her new novel: Lucky Boy. This moving story is about two unforgettable women in California: an undocumented Mexican woman and an Indian-American wife, both of whom love the same child but can’t have him. The novel beautifully weaves together the themes of motherhood, immigration, infertility, adoption and minority life in America. It is a must-read in our current political environment. For more detailed show notes, visit DIYMFA.com/132.

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Leon Wildes Answers One Question About ‘John Lennon vs. The U.S.A.’

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John Lennon was and continues to be an icon in music, counterculture, popular culture, fashion, and self-expression. But would you guess that he was also the face of the most high-profile deportation case in U.S. history? Yep, me neither. The Nixon administration hated the countercultural movement, or as WASPs called them: “hippies.” In Tricky Dick’s cloud of paranoia, he sought out anyone who could bring about an upheaval. John Lennon was foreign, anti-war, had a large platform with his music and wasn’t afraid to speak out. A dangerous combination. Nixon saw him as Public Enemy No. 1 and tried to kick him out of the country. Leon Wildes intimately knows the case because he was Lennon’s lawyer! Finally giving his…

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Author Imbolo Mbue Answers One Question about “Behold the Dreamers”

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The white picket fence with a rose garden out front; a four-bedroom home with 2.5 children and a quarter-acre backyard, including enough room for a swing and a grill; A stable job with a 20-minute commute into town and enough to pay off the mortgage. To many, this is the “American Dream.” To others, like myself, I think of the opening scene of David Lynch’s Blue Velvet. It might seem hunky-dory but there’s something festering and just not right underneath. I’m not knocking people if they have those aspirations — I’m simply saying they’re imperfect. Imbolo Mbue takes the nature of the American Dream to task in her debut novel, Behold the Dreamers (Random House, August 23 2016). Two families are…

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