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Friendship

Tall Poppy Review: Fragile Friendships in “The Glass Wives”

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In Amy Nathan’s The Glass Wives (Saint Martin’s Press), a devastating end becomes a beginning of sorts for Evie and Nicole Glass. When Richard Glass is killed in a tragic accident, Nicole is a sudden widow. But what does that make Evie, his ex-wife? Financial instability and an unknown future plague both women, and as they are thrust into the unknown they find themselves flailing. Hoping to find some security and longing for family in the midst of such loss, Nicole proposes that she and Luca, her toddler son, move in with Evie and her twins Sam and Sophie. Against her own better judgement, Evie agrees. As unexpected bonds form between the children, Evie and Nicole engage in a cautious…

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School Mom or Sociopath? Harding’s “Her Pretty Face”

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Robyn Harding, author of the dark domestic novel The Party (Gallery/Scout Press), has given us yet another pulse-quickening read, set within a seemingly normal friendship of mothers. In Her Pretty Face (Gallery/Scout Press), Harding follows the overweight, insecure Francis Metcalfe as she struggles to fit in with the other Forrester academy mothers. Francis is miserable and desperate for a friendly face, but her chances dwindle as her son is drawn into an event at school that spells social suicide for him. When the gorgeous, confident, charismatic Kate Rudolph chooses to befriend Francis over all others, Kate cannot believe her luck. As these women grow closer, secrets are revealed and it becomes clear that one of these women is hiding behind a wall of…

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Why David Duchovny and I Should Be Friends

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I started out being really pissed at David Duchovny. On January 3, 2017, my agent sent the manuscript of my third novel, entitled Miss Subways, out on submission to publishers. On January 9, 2017, the “Publishers Marketplace Daily Deals” e-newsletter announced that David Duchovny’s novel, entitled Miss Subways, had been sold to Farrar, Straus and Giroux for publication in Spring 2018. Come again? I sent an email to my agent asking her if this title hiccup would be a problem. Meanwhile, I swore under my breath at Duchovny for stealing my title, which I realized I wouldn’t get to use despite the fact that my novel was about the historic Miss Subways contest and his wasn’t; it was a supernatural novel, for goodness sake. My agent reassured…

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‘Green’ by Sam Graham-Felsen Explores Friendship and Diversity in 1990s Boston

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It is the 1990s and Dave, son of Harvard educated hippies, is one of only a few white kids in his Boston middle school.  Having a difficult time connecting with the other students, he becomes drawn to Marlon, a black kid from the projects who seems to have similar interests: video games, the Boston Celtics and getting into the better high school.  They become friendly but both are ashamed of their home lives and there is always a distance between them even as they become closer.  Still, they spend hours watching vintage basketball games and have conversations about lots of subjects. I felt compassion for both Dave, as he struggled to fit in, got pushed around on the bus, wanted…

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Friendship is Tested in Hendrix’s ‘My Best Friend’s Exorcism’

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Grady Hendrix always leaves us wanting more with his compelling take on the horror genre, but he really outdoes himself with his novel, My Best Friend’s Exorcism. This is one you won’t be able to put down, even when you’re on the edge of your seat in fear or wishing you weren’t crying from its dramatic flair! Abby and Gretchen have been friends ever since fourth grade in the early 80s, when nobody showed up for Abby’s birthday party. She wasn’t sure what it was – from the quiet way she held herself, to the lost look in her eyes, to the children’s bible she gave her for her present – but there was something different about Gretchen, and it…

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On Writing, Friendship and Healing: One Writer’s Journey to the Center of Self

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I met my friend and co-writer 10 years ago. With every year that went by, our friendship quickly escalated from a simple friendship to a soulmate friendship. We talked about everything and anything and it was easy. We both felt no judgment from the other and it made us feel better knowing we had someone to lean on. We were each other’s rock. Our friendship grew stronger and stronger and as she listened to the stories of my marriage, she kept saying that these stories could become be a book and it has now become a reality. As we jotted down the things that had happened in my marriage, she was shocked that I had gone through so much. We…

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Tall Poppies Review: Laura Drake Takes Sibling Devotion to a New Level in ‘Days Made of Glass’

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“Shared blood defines a family, but spilled blood can too…” ~ Days Made of Glass Buckle up readers, because your emotions are in for a roller coaster ride in Laura Drake’s Days Made of Glass – A gripping story of sibling devotion, mental illness and having to face hard truths about oneself. The symbolism in this story hits from every angle. Shattered glass is the splintering of the illusion of reality. In Drake’s novel the smashed mirrors are a sign of both enlightenment and madness. Shards of glass are everywhere, representing broken dreams, broken promises, broken relationships and broken people. Two sisters—tough-as-nails Harlie (the protector) and her younger sister Angel (the lost soul), have had a rough life. So far Harlie…

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10 Life Lessons From the Peanuts Gang

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On October 2, 1950, the first Peanuts comic strip was published in nine newspapers across the country. And in the more than 65 years since then, Charlie Brown, Lucy, Woodstock, and the rest of the Peanuts gang have been providing us with heartwarming lessons as told by their legendary creator, Charles M. Schulz. With 17,897 comic strips published in total, it is one of the most influential stories ever written. If you’re a fan of Snoopy and the rest of the gang, then you’ll enjoy the mischievous beagle’s hilarious adventures as he discovers some life lessons that everyone can benefit from learning. 1. When the game gets heated, Snoopy learns to be a gracious loser, appreciative winner, and positive teammate.…

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Author Paul Lisicky Answers One Question about ‘The Narrow Door’

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You are your own worst critic, but friends can be a close second. They know you better than most, aside from parents but even that can be up for debate. Going through a particularly rough time as a post-grad living in a new city where I know practically no one, I picked up Paul Lisicky’s The Narrow Door (Graywolf Press, January 19, 2016), a memoir about two relationships: one romantic, the other platonic. Lisicky weaves the narratives of life as a writer alongside his good friend and colleague Denise Gess and his troubled relationship with his ex-husband, poet Mark Doty. I highly recommend this fabulous book that so genuinely depicts the trials and selfish tribulations friendships evoke in us. Given…

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Talking Georgia Clark’s ‘The Regulars’: What’s So Bad about Being…Regular?

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Let’s face it, being a girl is hard. Deciding what to wear and then if that clothing fits your apple or pear body shape is not always enjoyable. Answering the question: do I have too much makeup on or not enough, is typically a rhetorical question, because is there ever really an answer? The list goes on and on. In a world where we are told to “just be ourselves,” there sure seems to be a lot of pressure on us ladies, from the “pretty” Snapchat filter to our Instagram news feeds filled with selfies of contouring celebrities, it’s no wonder where Georgia Clark found her inspiration for her latest witty and sexy novel, The Regulars (Emily Bestler Books, August 2, 2016). In Clark’s debut in adult fiction, Evie,…

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No woman is an island — even on Puffin Island

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Friendship is very important to me and there has rarely been an occasion in my life that hasn’t been enhanced by the presence of friends. They are there to share the celebrations and, if you’re lucky, they’re there in times of crisis. There have been so many times when my friends have stepped in to help when I needed them. When my second son was born seven weeks early as an emergency, it was a friend who left the warmth and comfort of her bed at three in the morning to babysit my eldest child so that my husband could come to the hospital with me, and another friend who stocked up our fridge with food until family arrived to…

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Susan Mallery on how friendship starts

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Finding our one true, romantic love is important, but it’s not the only cornerstone relationship of a happy life. We have just as deep a need for friends. The craving for connection is fundamental and universal, and so we search for our tribe. The infinite variations of friendship fascinate me. How does someone transition from stranger to acquaintance to friend? It’s magic! There’s something in each of us that responds to something in the people who become our closest friends. Often, it’s almost instantaneous. We meet, we click. Other times, it takes a little longer for that deep bond to form. And sometimes, we don’t remember not being friends with this special person because she’s been in our lives since…

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Friendship in Appalachia: Sweet Tea Rosemary Grilled Chicken inspired by Kathryn Magendie’s SWEETIE

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Shy and scientific-minded Melissa is the polar opposite of Sweetie, who finds magic in all she sees and possesses boundless energy and courage. In Sweetie (Bell Bridge Books, 2010), Kathryn Magendie chronicles the adventures and tragedies of these two girlhood friends as they come of age. Melissa’s mother simply doesn’t know what to make of her daughter’s new friend who seems to pop in and out of the thicket near their mountain community on a whim. Wondering about the girl’s seeming lack of supervision, never able to grasp the fact that her name is Sweetie not “Sweet Tea,” Melissa’s mother is unsure if her daughter should continue her friendship with the unusual girl. The devotion Sweetie and Melissa feel for each other, however, outweighs…

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It’s like we were the same person: Colette McBeth on the power of female friendships

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by Colette McBeth I met my best friend on my first day at a new school. We were eight years old. There was a spare seat next to a girl called Helene and my teacher instructed me to fill it. From that moment we slotted in next to each other, like two missing pieces of a jigsaw. Helene taught me things, like how to pretend to be ill to get out of lessons. She would go first, telling the teacher she felt sick. I followed five minutes later. The corridor smelt of damp coats and packed lunches but we were happy sitting there, just the two of us marvelling at our own ingenuity. Until one day we were sent to…

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