Tag archive

diversity

Debut Authors Amy Brewer and Patty Carothers on Collaboration and Writing a Happy Ending

in Fiction by

Rarely nowadays do we find books in the Young Adult genre that aren’t filled with death, murder, bullying, depression, and more. While books with these themes do hold an important place in literature, the market, after the success of books like 13 Reasons Why, has become saturated – if not over-saturated – with similar narratives and themes. Which is why reading the debut novel of friends and writing collaborators Patty Carothers and Amy Brewer feels like something of a breath of fresh air. Their debut work, Texting Prince Charming, as hinted at in the title, reads like a fairy tale – with a twist. After a tragic car accident, Shelby Ryan lost more than just her entire family – she’s also left…

Keep Reading

Women Rock! 6 Fictional Heroines Who Look Like Real Women

in Fiction by

It’s Women’s History Month and we are looking forward to all the events and books that celebrate the impact that women have on the world. In addition to bringing you the latest pop culture news and reviews where women are the focus, this month, we are also going to share with you some of the best BookTrib articles of the past that celebrate women and diversity.  Today, we feature this piece from June 17th, 2015 about fictional heroines that actually look like real women.    Fictional Heroines Who Look Like Real Women There is often an assumption while reading that the main characters are going to be thin. Unless otherwise stated, the reader is expected to picture a woman with slim…

Keep Reading

‘Green’ by Sam Graham-Felsen Explores Friendship and Diversity in 1990s Boston

in Fiction by

It is the 1990s and Dave, son of Harvard educated hippies, is one of only a few white kids in his Boston middle school.  Having a difficult time connecting with the other students, he becomes drawn to Marlon, a black kid from the projects who seems to have similar interests: video games, the Boston Celtics and getting into the better high school.  They become friendly but both are ashamed of their home lives and there is always a distance between them even as they become closer.  Still, they spend hours watching vintage basketball games and have conversations about lots of subjects. I felt compassion for both Dave, as he struggled to fit in, got pushed around on the bus, wanted…

Keep Reading

Black, White and (well) Read: Diverse Bookfinder Makes Diversity in Children’s Literature a Priority

in Potpourri by

According to the U. S. Census Bureau, by 2020, “more than half of the nation’s children are expected to be part of a minority race or ethnic group.” Therefore, it will be important for literature, specifically books, to accurately represent the diversity of the population. Growing up as a biracial child, it wasn’t easy for me to relate or identify with anyone. From people I saw on television shows, to the characters in the books, no one looked like me— or, more accurately— I didn’t really look like anyone else. This was something that I struggled with far past childhood, and into college. Even my older sister and I don’t look that similar. She has a darker complexion, despite having…

Keep Reading

‘Welcome to Night Vale’: Chatting it Up with Author Jeffrey Cranor

in Fiction by

When you listen to the podcast Welcome to Night Vale, it doesn’t matter if you were a fan from the beginning, or you became one after listening. Maybe you found it on Tumblr: the thing that becomes immediately apparent from the moment you first hear Cecil’s voice is that this is like nothing you’ve ever heard before. Welcome to Night Vale is funny, sometimes creepy, always fascinating, and you’ve definitely struggled to describe what it’s about to someone before. Now, Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor, the minds behind the podcast, have come out with It Devours! A Welcome to Night Vale Novel, following the 2015 release of their first, Welcome to Night Vale: A Novel. Booktrib was lucky enough to catch up with Jeffrey Cranor for…

Keep Reading

DIY MFA Radio Episode 132: Capturing Diverse Experiences on the Page — Interview with Shanthi Sekaran

in Potpourri by

This week Gabriela Pereira interviews Shanthi Sekaran about her new novel: Lucky Boy. This moving story is about two unforgettable women in California: an undocumented Mexican woman and an Indian-American wife, both of whom love the same child but can’t have him. The novel beautifully weaves together the themes of motherhood, immigration, infertility, adoption and minority life in America. It is a must-read in our current political environment. For more detailed show notes, visit DIYMFA.com/132.

Keep Reading

DIY MFA Radio Episode 111: Writing Middle Grade Fiction – Interview with Erin Petti

in Fiction by

In this episode, Gabriela Pereira interviews author Erin Petti about her debut novel, The Peculiar Haunting of Thelma Bee. They discuss the most important aspects of writing middle grade series and how to build a setting that feels real by using the experiences you have in everyday, real-life places. They discuss the importance of diversity in books for young people. And Petti shares what it’s like being a debut author: the challenges, surprises, and fun parts. For more detailed show notes, visit DIYMFA.com/111

Keep Reading

Romance Writers of America Takes a Stand for Diversity

in Romance by

The folks who love to write about love are taking a stand for inclusivity. The Romance Writers of America released a statement on April 4, 2016 making it absolutely clear where they stand on the subject of inclusivity for members from the LGBTQ community. This is welcome news during a time when civil rights for people who identify as gay or transgender are being eroded in several states. Important Message Regarding 2005 “Definition of Romance” Survey At the November 2015 Board of Directors meeting, one of the issues discussed was an RWA survey conducted in 2005. Though this occurred eleven years ago, the ill effects of that survey still linger for many members. The survey was included in the Romance Writers…

Keep Reading

Ellen Oh discusses why we need diverse books

in Non-Fiction by

If you’re a frequent Twitter user, then you’ve probably already heard of We Need Diverse Books. The phenomenon hit social media last year, shortly after BookCon announced a panel, “Blockbuster Reads: Meet the Kids’ Authors That Dazzle,” which only featured white men. A few YA authors, including popular fantasy author Ellen Oh, refused to take this sitting down. Along with 22 other authors, publishers and bloggers, she organized a campaign designed at bringing diversity and awareness to children’s literature. From May 1 to 3, 2014, readers, authors, and concerned citizens were encouraged to take action, including holding up cue cards completing the sentence: “We need diverse books because…” The response was immediate: #WeNeedDiverseBooks went viral, with thousands of users posting…

Keep Reading

Holiday movies for the rest of us

in Fiction by

Chestnuts roasting on an open fire. Jack Frost nipping at your nose… In the words of my favorite 80’s cartoon character, gag me with a silver spoon. This is the time of year that radio and television stations bombard the citizenry with all things Christmas. Santa Claus, Frosty, Rudolph and sweet baby Jesus rule the airwaves from the day after Thanksgiving until New Year’s Day. (We shall not discuss those radio stations that started playing Christmas carols BEFORE Thanksgiving. There is a special place for people like you.) Like family dinners, with all that is awesome about the holiday season there is bound to be some funkiness. In this case, it’s a (less than) surprising lack of diversity in what…

Keep Reading

Go to Top