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Daphne du Maurier

Peter Swanson on What Makes a Heart Pounding Thriller

in Thrillers by

There are good psychological thrillers, and then there are great psychological thrillers – the ones that leave your heart pounding, and your breathing just a touch too fast. While sometimes it can be hard to sort between the two, now you don’t have to: Peter Swanson, author of Her Every Fear has just come out with his latest contribution to the genre. All the Beautiful Lies is a twisted tale, equally as beautiful as it is thrilling. Taking place on the coast of Maine, Harry Ackerson returns home just days before his graduation from college when his stepmother Alice calls to tell him that his father has died and the police think it’s suicide. There, he promises himself that he will discover the truth…

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10 Thriller Classics Perfect for a November Night

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This month a host of new thrillers will hit the big screen in time for the day-after-Thanksgiving movie going crowd. A few of these, including Roman J. Israel, Esq., starring Denzel Washington, are sure to become classics we will want to revisit over and over again. Until, these films are in theaters (some starting tomorrow), we thought we’d share some our favorite thriller classics that are perfect to watch on a cold, rainy November evening. The Shining   Who could ever forget Jack Nicholson in The Shining? The film is heralded as one of the greatest movies ever made, with the famous “Here’s Johnny!” scene down in history as one of the most famous movie scenes of all time. The film was…

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Books that made me lose sleep. WIN: Horrorstor by Grady Hendrix

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I may have outgrown candy corn and those weird caramel apple chews that seem to only exist in October, but I hope I’ll never lose my taste for books that keep me up till midnight, tossing, turning, and worrying about what, exactly, lurks under my bed. In fourth grade, my whole class was terrified—haunted, even—by Mary Downing Hahn’s Wait Till Helen Comes. Sure, there was an aspect of performance involved (culminating with a fake swoon from Anna W that I still envy) as we read and re-read the story of a step-family’s fragile happiness threatened by a centuries-old drowned ghost. But there was genuine, satisfying unease along with our posturing: the ghost in question is fueled by loneliness, making Helen…

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I dreamt I went to Manderley again. Or was it Miss Havisham’s house?

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The time is ripe for backstories and sequels. We can’t get enough of extending a beloved story as far as possible. No, not the latest Hobbit movie, or the long-heralded return of the Star Wars saga in 2015; I’m talking about the perennial draw of literary updates. There are many fraught questions to consider when modernizing a classic: how true will this be to the original when it comes to chronology, voice, incident, and character? Will it be history, future story (sequel), or deeper, contemporaneous story? How much is invented, and are any additions warranted? Is the new interpretation relevant, contemporary, and believable? In sum, is this new version necessary? In my view, it must either add something to the…

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