Author

Tracy Manaster

Tracy Manaster has 5 articles published.

Tracy Manaster is the debut author of the new novel, YOU COULD BE HOME BY NOW, which will be published this winter by Tyrus Books. A graduate of Wesleyan University and The Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she has lived in twelve of the fifty states and intends to stick with Oregon, where she lives with her husband and twin daughters, for the foreseeable future.

Kathryn Miles reveals our weather security crisis in Super Storm

in Non-Fiction by

Kathryn Miles’ Super Storm: Nine Days Inside Hurricane Sandy is a gripping book on an enormous scale, offering a moment-by-moment look at the storm and its ongoing fallout. BookTrib spoke with Miles about the storm that was and the storms that are yet to come. BookTrib: SUPER STORM is an edge-of-year-seat read, yet it’s also quite grounded in scientific detail. Can you talk a bit about your approach in presenting so that laypeople find it compelling? Kathryn Miles: Part of it first was getting educated myself. Luckily, the meteorologists at the National Hurricane Center and the National Weather Service (as well as professors and private meteorologists) were incredibly generous with their time. I had unfettered access to [both agencies] and…

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Books that made me lose sleep. WIN: Horrorstor by Grady Hendrix

in Fiction by

I may have outgrown candy corn and those weird caramel apple chews that seem to only exist in October, but I hope I’ll never lose my taste for books that keep me up till midnight, tossing, turning, and worrying about what, exactly, lurks under my bed. In fourth grade, my whole class was terrified—haunted, even—by Mary Downing Hahn’s Wait Till Helen Comes. Sure, there was an aspect of performance involved (culminating with a fake swoon from Anna W that I still envy) as we read and re-read the story of a step-family’s fragile happiness threatened by a centuries-old drowned ghost. But there was genuine, satisfying unease along with our posturing: the ghost in question is fueled by loneliness, making Helen…

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Culture shock, cliches and a (possible) wedding: up close with mystery maven Leslie Meier

in Fiction by

Autumn is upon us and there’s a chill in the air—what better time to cozy up in your favorite easy chair with a warm drink and a cozy mystery? For those unfamiliar with the genre, cozy mysteries (sometimes known simply as “cozies”) are murder mysteries in which sex and violence are downplayed in favor of a lighter, more humorous tone. Think more Miss Marple than Sam Spade. A great new cozy mystery is French Pastry Murder, the latest in the Lucy Stone series from author Leslie Meier. In the book, Meier’s heroine visits the City of Lights to be recognized for her charitable works. But Lucy has to rely upon her sleuthing skills when her vacation turns deadly.  Recently, BookTrib…

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Solving the mystery of Tana French; one of fall’s most eagerly awaited novels

in Fiction by

When I was a kid, my parents had a thing for Murder, She Wrote. We’d watch every week, competing to guess whodunit, how, and why. And somehow, one Sunday, it clicked for me: the culprit was always the extra person, the one whose absence (minus that PG offing in Act I) would have minimal repercussions for the rest of the story. I started winning, wowing my family with an unprecedented run of spot-on guesses. I like to win, and the “extra person” hack helps me do it. I’ve beat Miss Marple to the solution on several occasions. I don’t win when it comes to the works of Tana French. (As a solver of mysteries, I mean; as a book-lover, French…

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The book you wish you had read as a teen: Laini Taylor’s Dreams of Gods and Monsters

in Fiction by

You probably have a list of books that you were never quite the same after reading; I know I do. Stories that were just what you needed at a specific point in your life, novels that, had you read them at another time, you would have liked well enough but that would not have had that same kind of absolute, lifelong resonance. I liked Laini Taylor’s Dreams of Gods and Monsters well enough. I liked her whole Daughter of Smoke and Bone series a lot, actually. But what I really wanted, reading it, was to send it—as if in some kind of reverse time capsule—to my adolescent self, knowing that she would find it formative and essential  instead of  just…

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