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children’s book

The Harrowing Journey That Led Debut Author Tamara B. Rodriguez to Write ‘Hair to the Queen!’

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Introducing new children’s book, Hair to the Queen!, by first-time author, mother and cancer survivor, Tamara B. Rodriguez. Rodriguez shares her writing journey below. As nearly everyone knows, October is recognized as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month by the media and cancer survivors, alike. So, why is a first-time author and career-long accountant like me debuting a children’s book about cancer in November? It’s a long story. My relationship with my breasts has been an emotional roller coaster, starting from my days as a busty teenager to becoming relatively flat-chested after I stopped breastfeeding my two daughters. At 34 years-old, I remember standing in front of the full-length mirror and nostalgically recognizing how much my body had changed over the…

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From Bruce Springsteen to Megyn Kelly: A Big Week for Celebrity Book Deals

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In the ever-escalating celebrity book deal game, it’s hard to keep track of what great books we have to look forward to these days. Today, high-profile book deals seem to be the next step in further developing a celebrities brand. So in the spirit of helping all of you celeb memoir gobblers stay organized, here’s a quick roundup of book deals that were nailed down in the past week! On February 11, New Jersey rock god Bruce Springsteen nabbed a $10 million deal with Simon & Schuster to pen his autobiography. The book, perfectly titled Born to Run, will feature Springsteen’s recollections on growing up and the rise of the E Street Band. “Writing about yourself is a funny business,” wrote Springsteen…

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Jane Hissey creates cuddly lessons in imagination and acceptance

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A book by Jane Hissey is like a favorite stuffed animal, a well-worn security blanket, a tattered box of mismatched crayons and colored pencils. In other words: comfortable, reassuring, bursting with color and creativity—and essential to any child’s room. If you have a young child, odds are you have a Jane Hissey book in your collection and may not even know it. Why is that? Because her books have such a timeless look and feel that transcends the personality of the author—as if they’d always been there, existing alongside the fairy tales and lullabies. Beginning with Old Bear (her most well-known) and the 20 or so other children’s books that followed, Jane Hissey’s illustrations bring to life all the soft…

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The Magic Repair Shop will cast a spell on your middle-grade reader

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Reading is fundamental. Anyone who watched television in the 1980s remembers RIF’s PSA encouraging young people to read. The biggest hurdle to getting children to read is finding something that they actually want to read. There are many iterations of this quote, but the message is the same regardless of the attribution—if you don’t like to read, you haven’t found the right book. So what is an adult to do when confronted with a reluctant reader? Take solace in recent Kids & Families Report that found 70 percent of kids want to read something that makes them laugh and 54 percent want to read books that let them use their imagination. Isn’t that amazing? Who would have thought that kids…

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A Little Women Christmas beautifully illustrates the season’s good will

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I recently took a copy of A Little Women Christmas (Simon & Schuster, 2014) to read with my Reading Buddy, Heidi. Author Heather Vogel Frederick took the story of Mr. March’s surprise homecoming from Louisa Mae Alcott’s classic, Little Women, and adapted it for 4-7 year olds. Who better to review a book than someone it was written for? Heidi is in kindergarten, so we usually spend time working on learning letters and beginning sight words, but I asked Heidi if, that day, she would help me read a new book.  I pulled the book out of my bag and as I told Heidi a little about Little Women, I could see the girl at the table behind us listening,…

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David Biedrzycki on bears, dragons, broccoli–and how to pronounce his name

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David Biedrzycki (pronounced… well, see below) grew up on 1960s TV shows, worked in advertising for a lot of years, and then became a children’s book author and illustrator. His published work includes the Ace Lacewing: Bug Detective series, the Me and My Dragon books, and a couple of books about Santa. His latest is called Breaking News: Bear Alert. David was kind enough to answer some questions about how he got his start in children’s books, how dragons are like dogs, and how to pronounce his surname. BookTrib: First off, how do you pronounce your last name? Whenever I read to my 5-year-old, he wants me to read EVERYTHING, including the author’s/illustrator’s name. We’ve been having fun guessing, but…

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Author Tanya Lee Stone celebrates her 100th book — by starting her 101st!

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What do 100 books look like? For author Tanya Lee Stone, who just recently finished her 100th book, it includes a wide variety of titles—from picture books to nonfiction to young adult novels. Color Has No Courage, her nonfiction account of America’s first black paratroopers, won an NAACP Image Award, while her picture book, Who Says Women Can’t Be Doctors, was an NPR Best Book of 2013. The list goes on and on (and on!). Girl Rising, due in 2016, is officially Stone’s 100th book, and is an adaptation of the movie.  “I am expanding the content of that beautiful film to cover more ground and tell more stories in it than the medium of film would allow,” Stone said…

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Top 5 children’s books for Earth Day

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This Earth Day, consider the power that the spare prose and arresting illustrations of children’s literature have in delivering a message.  Children’s books have the ability to teach us a thing or two about the delicate dance that happens between us and our planet. Here are five of the most visually stunning children’s books to celebrate Earth Day: The Lorax by Dr. Seuss The Lorax combines intense visuals (think bright pink and yellow truffula trees) and lessons that rhyme—a classic tale about saving Mother Earth. I’ll Follow the Moon written by Stephanie Lisa Tara, illustrated by Lee Edward Fodi Awash in images of sea turtles amidst calm and serene blue waters, this story highlights the strong bond between a mother…

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