Tag archive

Black History Month

The Daughter Who Slipped Away: Thomas Jefferson, Race, Class and the Search for a President’s Lost Family

in Fiction by

After 40 years of research by historians that was supported with extensive DNA study, the stories that Thomas Jefferson fathered children with an enslaved woman, Sally Hemings, are now accepted as fact. Now to the family archives comes a new book, Jefferson’s Daughters: Three Sisters, White and Black, in a Young America by Catherine Kerrison, a professor of American history at Villanova University. “Their lives provide a unique vantage point by which to study the complicated American Revolution itself,” said Kerrison at the U.S. National Archives in Washington, D.C., where she recently spoke about her book for Black History Month. Thomas Jefferson—Founding Father, author of the Declaration of Independence, and third president of the United States­­­­—had six children with his wife,…

Keep Reading

Kicking Off Black History Month with Vashti Harrison, Author of ‘Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History’

in Non-Fiction by

To kick off Black History Month, we are sharing a Q&A with Vashti Harrison, author of The New York Times Bestseller, Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History.  The book debuted at number three and was one of the most anticipated books of 2018 with a number of well know celebrities and dignitaries, like Chelsea Clinton, sharing their love for the book and its author on social media. This week, it was announced that Vashti Harrison will be illustrating the book series, Hair Love, written by filmmaker and former NFL player Matthew A. Cherry. The UK version of Harrison’s Little Leaders will be released next month featuring some new additions, including Claudia Jones, Anna Julia Cooper, and Sister Rosetta Tharpe. In addition…

Keep Reading

TED Talks: Bryan Stevenson on Identity and Injustice

in Non-Fiction by

Black History Month ends in just a few days, so this week’s installment of TED Talks Tuesday is one of the most elegant examinations of race in America ever given on the TED stage. Human Rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson’s moving talk from TED 2012 paints a hard picture of America’s criminal justice framework – but he does more than illustrate the obvious problems with our current system. Stevenson urges people to become more aware of what he calls “the dark and difficult things” in today’s society, and argues that history judges societies by how they treat their most disenfranchised populations. It goes beyond the political, and moves into the realms of morality and cultural self-awareness with a grace, courage and…

Keep Reading

End Black History Month with some great lit-inspired movies

in Fiction by

It is no secret that this Bookish Diva (as well as her fellow members of the Nerd Squad) loves a good book-to-movie adaptation. And with Black History Month coming to a close, what better time to watch some great films highlighting portions of the black experience. But don’t limit them to one month a year—they’re great entertainment anytime. Lady Sings the Blues (1972; R; 144 min) based on Lady Sings the Blues by Billie Holliday and William Duffy Glamorous tragedy doggedly followed Billie Holiday, as played by Diana Ross. Not afraid to put the demons that haunted her on display, Lady Sings the Blues captured the triumphs and calamities of one of Black America’s most revered icons.   Cotton Comes…

Keep Reading

Children portray Black History Month icons in Because of Them, We Can

in Non-Fiction by

Today we are giving you a dose of cuteness for a cause.     The Because of Them, We Can campaign was born from photographer Eunique Jones Gibson’s desire to share the rich history of black people as well as the limitless future potential by using photographs that challenged negative stereotypes.     This is bigger than taking pictures of cute children dressed as influential people of African descent. It is about empowering children, giving them a sense of worth based on their shared history, letting them know that they can do all that their predecessors did and even more.     To learn (and see) more, visit Because of Them, We Can.    

Keep Reading

Ellen Oh discusses why we need diverse books

in Non-Fiction by

If you’re a frequent Twitter user, then you’ve probably already heard of We Need Diverse Books. The phenomenon hit social media last year, shortly after BookCon announced a panel, “Blockbuster Reads: Meet the Kids’ Authors That Dazzle,” which only featured white men. A few YA authors, including popular fantasy author Ellen Oh, refused to take this sitting down. Along with 22 other authors, publishers and bloggers, she organized a campaign designed at bringing diversity and awareness to children’s literature. From May 1 to 3, 2014, readers, authors, and concerned citizens were encouraged to take action, including holding up cue cards completing the sentence: “We need diverse books because…” The response was immediate: #WeNeedDiverseBooks went viral, with thousands of users posting…

Keep Reading

Go to Top