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Autism

Interview with Maxine Rosaler, Author of “Queen for a Day”

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It is bold work to invite us into the world of children who are eligible for special education—and their long suffering parents. Maxine Rosaler does this in her novel, Queen for a Day, through her main character, Mimi Slavitt and her young son, Danny. We, the audience, are alongside Mimi as she attempts to accept and comprehend her autistic son’s world. In the process, Mimi — and so we the readers — are introduced to the other mothers and their children, whom she encounters along the path, and the social system that provides aid. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2015-2016, 6.7 million students between the ages of three and 21 received special education services. Among the…

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Interview with Benjamin Ludwig, author of ‘Ginny Moon’

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Watch our author video interview, “15 minutes with… Benjamin Ludwig,” now! Here, we talk about his debut release, Ginny Moon, how his daughter was a big inspiration for the book and what Ludwig wants to write next! You don’t want to miss this interview brought to you by NetGalley, Meryl Moss Media and BookTrib.com. See the world differently. Ginny Moon is a recently adopted teenager with autism. She has a new home, new parents, and a new last name. Before Ginny arrived at her new house, she spent years living in danger with her birth-mother. Her world is a much better, safer place now, and everyone tells her that she should feel happy. But Ginny is stifled. Her voice is pushed down. Silenced. Bottled…

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YA Author Claire LaZebnik Wants Autistic Characters to be the Star of the Show

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content, including this article written by Claire LaZebnik, author of Things I Should Have Known (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for Young Readers, March 28, 2017). Author Claire LaZebnik has written both adult and YA novels, as well as educational and parenting books for those with a child or teen on the Autism Spectrum. Her most recent novel, Things I Should Have Known, dives deep into the lives of those living with autism and the development of relationships with the ones closest to them. Claire LaZebnik‘s latest young adult novel, Things I Should Have Known, follows two sisters as they navigate high school. One is autistic and one is not. When LaZebnik’s son was…

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Embracing the Obstacle of Autism: Do You See Me Out of Order?

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In our world, everyone faces obstacles and overcomes difficulty. The top neuro-psychological doctor told my parents when I was two years old, “Your son has autism, and will never be able to read, write or communicate.” My parents made the right decision to find the best resources around for children who have autism. People who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have difficulty understanding abstract concepts and communicating with the world around them. There was a notion in the last decade that if one had a mental or learning disability, they were considered stupid. Many citizens fight for the rights of people with learning disabilities. We are just like everyone else — and can do anything we set our minds to.…

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Video: Interview with Marguerite Elisofon and My Picture Perfect Family: What Happens When One Twin Has Autism

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On December 26th, 1990 Marguerite Elisofon gave birth to premature twins: Samantha and Matthew. Marguerite and her husband soon noticed their daughter lagged behind her brother in ways that scared them. Samantha, they learned, was on the autistic spectrum. Most “experts” weren’t optimistic about her chances for leading a normal life and prepared the Elisofons for the worst. But Marguerite and her family refused to accept these limitations. Twenty-three challenging years later, Samantha graduated from Pace University . . . cum laude! In My Picture Perfect Family, Marguerite tells her family’s courageous story. At the end of the twentieth century, when the current supports for children on the autistic spectrum did not exist, Marguerite and her family pioneered their own…

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PODCAST: Authors Marguerite Elisofon and Ann Martin Talk ‘Rain Reign’ and Autism Awareness

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Author of the memoir My Picture Perfect Family (Central Park Publishers, 2016) Marguerite Elisofon chronicles the true story of raising twins in New York City and the journey that takes place following their daughter’s diagnoses on the Autism Spectrum. She sat down in with novelist Ann Martin to talk about her book Rain Reign (ALA Notable Children’s Books, 2014), in which the story is narrated by a young girl on the spectrum.   About the Authors About Marguerite Elisofon: Marguerite Elisofon is a New York City writer and the author of My Picture Perfect Family, a memoir about how her family navigated life with a child on the autistic spectrum before the internet and support groups existed. She also blogs about parenting young adults and disability…

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Rupert Isaacson’s ‘The Long Ride Home’ Follows an Autistic Boy’s Journey Around the World

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One year after Rupert Isaacson, founder of The Horse Boy Foundation, and Autistic son Rowan met with a shaman in Mongolia in the hopes of somehow helping Rowan (a story you can read about in Isaacson’s first book, The Horse Boy), Isaacson started to notice that his son’s behavior was regressing, despite the significant improvement he showed after leaving Mongolia. It was clear that something was missing, and then Isaacson recalled the shaman telling him Rowan would need to experience three other healing journeys. In The Long Ride Home (Horse Boy Press, March 3), Isaacson shares the life-changing trek from Africa to Australia and back to the United States that changed not only Rowan’s life but the entire family’s life as well. Chock-full of…

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Video: Missed It? Interview with Rupert Isaacson and The Long Ride Home

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When his son Rowan was diagnosed with autism, Rupert Isaacson feared they might never communicate. But when he discovered Rowan responded to horses, they traveled to Mongolia–the spiritual home of the horse–where shaman banished the tantrums, the incontinence, and the hopeless isolation. A year later, Rowan started regressing. Only then did Rupert remember the shaman had told him that they must make three more healing journeys. So they went: to the Bushmen of Namibia and Australia’s coastal rainforests, and to America’s Navajo reservation, discovering new ways of connecting with autistic children using nature, movement, and animals, unlocking children from their most severe symptoms and developing two internationally known programs: Horse Boy Method and Movement Method. The Long Ride Home is…

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Actress Samantha Elisofon Talks Representation by Actors on the Autism Spectrum

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If you haven’t yet heard of Keep the Change, a love story written for and starring actors on the Autism spectrum, then I urge you to give this short film your full attention. It follows David (Brandon Polansky), a wealthy young man who meets a sheltered young woman, Sarah (Samantha Elisofon), at a support group. The two head off on a journey around New York City as they learn about each other and even themselves. Can David give up his “playboy” ways? And will Sarah get him to open up and see that “normal” may not be the only way to live. It’s beautiful, heartwarming and has won the Columbia University Film Festival’s Focus Features Best Film Award, as well as the Alumni Award,…

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What Ron Suskind learned from his autistic son about using experiences to shape our story

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“The amazing part of this whole journey is what we all learned,” says author Ron Suskind reflecting on his family’s long journey that started in 1993 after his youngest son, Owen, was diagnosed with autism. The quote applies equally well, though, to anyone who reads Suskind’s book about the experience. Suskind is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and the author of five books of creative non-fiction dealing with topics ranging from race and class in America, to the Bush administration, the war on terror, and the American economy. In his latest book, Life Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism (Kingswell), he turns his journalist’s eye on his own family, detailing the turbulent years after Owen was diagnosed with autism…

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A spectrum of creativity: the intersection of art and autism

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Instead of narrowing down and defining autism and the art created by those who live with the disorder, in Drawing Autism (Akashic, March), behavior analyst Jill Mullin embraces the full range and spectrum of autism and artistic expression. The rich and varied images she selects show the multiplicity of perspective, processes, media, themes and experiences of the artists, both young and old, offering a view of complexity, individuality, and ultimately a better understanding that good art, whether made by autistic artists or not, offers a unique yet universally accessible perspective and deeper understanding of how we are all connected. Some of the artists chosen for the book sell their work, are represented by galleries, and are professional artists. But others are…

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