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art

“On Color” Prompts Us To Think About What We See

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David Scott Kastan, a  George M. Bodman Professor of English at Yale University and Stephen Farthing, an artist and elected member of the Royal Academy of Arts in London and Emeritus Fellow of St. Edmund Hall, the University of Oxford, have collaborated on this beautiful, and educational book about the history of color and how it plays out in the world through art, politics, perceptions and more. On Color (Yale University Press) encourages us to think about what we see, what each color symbolizes  and how it makes us feel.     According to the authors, scientists believe there are more than 17 million different colors.  Red is known to be the color of roses, yet is the rose red or does…

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How To Judge A Book By Its Cover: 18 Famous Books

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Have you ever stopped to think about how your favorite books’ covers were conceptualized? The Grapes of Wrath cover artist, Elmer Hader, made a living illustrating children’s books with his wife, and that’s how John Steinbeck discovered his work. The stories behind some of the most iconic book covers are truly fascinating, and this infographic from Invaluable highlights some of the most recognized throughout history. Check out how each designer brought their visions to life!   Want more BookTrib? Sign up NOW for news and giveaways!

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Poet, Social Activist and Storyteller Cleo Wade Talks from the Heart

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The Cut called her The Millennial Oprah,  Fast Company named her one of the country’s 100 Most Creative People of 2017, and with featured articles and photoshoots in Elle, Time, and Entertainment Weekly, it is clear: Cleo Wade is not your average “Instagram poet.” A self-proclaimed social activist, poet, artist and storyteller, Wade isn’t just an online personality who wrote a book to cash in on her celebrity.  For her, this comes from the heart and her words of inspiration and advice are anything but run-of-the-mill; they’re art that speaks to both your mind and your soul. Heart Talk: Poetic Wisdom for a Better Life (Atria/37 INK), Wade’s first book, is a poetry collection that reads more like you’re having a personal…

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‘You Must Change Your Life’: Award-winning Author Rachel Corbett on Rodin and Rilke

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Rachel Corbett has made an art of writing history. The author, art journalist and editor won the 2016 Marfield Prize for her book You Must Change Your Life: The Story of Rainer Maria Rilke and Auguste Rodin. The book documents the relationship between Rilke and Rodin, the former a famous poet and novelist, the latter a French sculptor known for his works like The Thinker, and The Gates of Hell. The unlikely pair first met when Rilke traveled to Paris in 1902 to write a monograph on Rodin, and became friends instantaneously. After reading a French translation of Rilke’s book, Rodin even hired him as his secretary. The relationship between the two was one that has to be read about to be believed, and Rachel Corbett…

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The Body Beautiful: Marjorie Goodson Turns Her Love of Dance into Art in ‘MG’

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Marjorie Goodson is the daughter of famed game show producer Mark Goodson (Family Feud, The Price is Right, Beat the Clock). She began at the prestigious School of American Ballet when she was only eight. This experience sparked an enduring love of ballet and dance that would sustain her for the rest of her life. Goodson has always loved using her body artistically. With her new book, Goodson hopes to inspire other women by letting them know they, too, can find their passion and confidence at any age. BookTrib recently spoke with Marjorie about her book, MG, advice for empty nesters and, of course, her passion for dance. BookTrib: The book is beautiful. What made you decide to do this…

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The Face: Fornasetti’s Unique Vision Lives On

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It’s rare for an artist’s work to transcend time, speaking to each new generation regardless of changing trends. But that’s exactly the case with the work of Piero Fornasetti, an Italian artist whose graphic and imaginative designs feel just as relevant today. Fornasetti lived from 1913 to 1988, creating thousands of pieces of art. And he didn’t just do prints either; he put his whimsical images on plates, chairs, lamps and more, turning household items into priceless works. It’s estimated that he produced more than 11,000 different pieces, surrealistic visions that bridged the gap between high art and useable, everyday objects. And his vision was certainly unique. Known for his bold use of black and white and dreamlike images, Fornasetti…

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Review: Dive Into Psychological Mystery on Peregrine Island

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Tolstoy said that every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. Diane B. Saxton, the debut author of Peregrine Island (She Writes Press, August 2, 2016), would probably agree. Her new novel dives into a memorably dysfunctional family, the Peregrines, living on the titular private island on Long Island Sound. Three generations of women live there: Winter, the calculating matriarch, her rebellious adult daughter, Elsie, and her child daughter, Peda. The novel alternates between these three very distinct viewpoints – giving readers the impression of an isolated family wrapped up in years of internal angst. This serves to heighten the sense of mystery when the main story comes into play. It’s hard to describe what’s going on in Peregrine…

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Unique Adult Coloring Books to Keep You Busy on #NationalColoringBookDay

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Adult coloring books are everywhere, it’s seriously the new craze and no longer just for kids! Whether you want to color in or out of the lines is now a decision that people of all ages are making. Let’s face it, life can be hectic for us adults and sometimes you just need some quiet time to settle down and relax. So grab a pencil sharpener, and hey, even a glass of wine, and get coloring because August 2 is National Coloring Book Day! We’ve even got four unique coloring books that you won’t have to share with your kids: Calm the F*ck Down: An Irreverent Adult Coloring Book, Sasha O’Hara (CreateSpace, January 2016) This title is pretty self explanatory. When you’re feeling…

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TED Talk: Safwat Saleem Urges You to Find Your Voice — Plus, a Helpful Book List

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Finding a voice to fit your identity is never easy. However, artist, designer and animator Safwat Saleem, had a particularly difficult time, struggling with anxiety about his childhood stutter. In this thought-provoking, heartfelt and adorably animated talk from TED 2016, Saleem describes how he overcame his struggle to incorporate his voice into his artwork, not only through childhood, but in the face of rude YouTube commenters who ridiculed his Pakistani accent as an adult. Instead of letting ill-mannered commenters keep him from using his own voice in his work, Saleem rather unpacks the reasons behind those comments: differing definitions of “normality” that lead to preconceived notions. Saleem resolves to use his art to challenge those preconceived notions, which is about…

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TED Talks: Candy Chang Discusses Her Before I Die Project

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Art has the power to create inspiration from hardship, the power to bring emotional clarity to difficult times, and the power to make people laugh like idiots. Artist Candy Chang, in this week’s TED Tuesday pick, describes her Before I Die project, where she took a blank public wall and created a community art piece that is as charmingly funny as it is deeply contemplative. Her experiment in public participation, with the goal of turning “a neglected space into a constrictive one” as she puts it, has grown into a global movement. Chang’s emotional and stirring talk proves that visual art has the power to heal, amuse, and bring people together in unexpected ways. Recommended Reading: Before I Die, Candy…

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Adult coloring books are the new craze

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Remember that feeling you had as a kid during rainy days, when you would bust out your box of Crayolas and your favorite coloring book and create a dazzling work of art? Millions of people around the world are still enjoying that experience—and these days, many of them are adults. In fact, coloring books for grown-ups have become one of the hottest niches in publishing, and new titles featuring amazing and elaborate artwork are popping up everywhere. The trend started in 2013, with the release of Secret Garden: An Inky Treasure Hunt and Coloring Book (Laurence King Publishing) by Johanna Basford. The book, 96 pages of intricate black-and-white drawings of flowers, trees, birds, and other garden-related objects, became an instant…

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A spectrum of creativity: the intersection of art and autism

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Instead of narrowing down and defining autism and the art created by those who live with the disorder, in Drawing Autism (Akashic, March), behavior analyst Jill Mullin embraces the full range and spectrum of autism and artistic expression. The rich and varied images she selects show the multiplicity of perspective, processes, media, themes and experiences of the artists, both young and old, offering a view of complexity, individuality, and ultimately a better understanding that good art, whether made by autistic artists or not, offers a unique yet universally accessible perspective and deeper understanding of how we are all connected. Some of the artists chosen for the book sell their work, are represented by galleries, and are professional artists. But others are…

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Oodles of Doodles: Which type are you?

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I knew from a very young age that I was a doodler—in fact, I was a repeat offender. Any time that I had to focus in class, my pen would instantly begin to move across the margins of my three-ring notebook: a flourish of spirals here, a cascade of words and phrases there. It didn’t matter what I drew; it always helped me take in whatever was going on around me. I usually doodled random words or nature scenes but I never really considered why I chose the doodles I did. To this day, I still doodle during work meetings. My mother is also a chronic doodler. Every time she is on a phone call that requires concentration—or even just…

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What’s so great about writing by hand?

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For most of my young life, I hated my own handwriting. The other girls in my class wrote with such beautiful, rounded loopy script and I envied them, even the ones who dotted their i’s with little hearts. My scratchy letters always came out flattened, each one drooping ever closer to the line as if they’d all lost the will to stand straight. My sentences invariably seemed to need a good, long nap. I wish I could say that a lifetime of writing had molded my script into something that resembled the graceful lilt of the other girls, but I’m afraid it’s still relatively unpretty and largely unreadable by the untrained eye. I’m sure I’m not alone. With the advent…

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