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Rachel Carter has 518 articles published.

Rachel Carter grew up surrounded by trees and snow and mountains. She graduated from the University of Vermont and Columbia University, where she received her MFA in nonfiction writing. She is the author of the So Close to You series with Harperteen. These days you can find her working on her next novel in the woods of Vermont.

Why NBC’s ‘The Good Place’ is Our New Fave Show

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Guys, I’m obsessed. Which, admittedly, isn’t news: as a true TV lover, I tend to find myself getting obsessed with a new show almost every week. But this time it’s different, I swear. Because I literally cannot stop watching NBC’s The Good Place. When it first aired last year, I thought the NBC comedy was cute and funny, but probably wasn’t going to last. I mean, a high concept comedy about the afterlife? It sounds like the kind of thing that almost always dies on network television. But the more I kept watching, the more I was charmed by both the writing and the performances. And, oh man, are the performances good. The show stars Kristen Bell as Eleanor Shellstrop, a…

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‘Craving’ Chrissy Tiegan’s Banana Bread? We Have the Recipe!

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It’s always exciting to hear about the secret talents of your favorite celebrities, especially when those talents include making delicious meals. Whether it’s Chrissy Teigen‘s home-style recipe for banana bread or Patti Labelle’s mouthwatering desserts, we can’t get enough of celebrity cookbooks these days. Sprinkled with intimate stories and culinary adventures, these cookbooks are a great way to learn more about your favorite stars, and to get some awesome new ideas for the kitchen. Here are 6 of our favorites: Cooking with Zac, Zac Posen (Rodale Books, October 10, 2017) It turns out Posen isn’t just a designer of clothes, he also knows how to make it work in the kitchen. Cooking with Zac combines sophisticated recipes with more homey…

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Season 4 of ‘The Flash’ Premieres Tonight! We Have Spoilers You Won’t Want To Miss

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Warning: Slight Spoilers Ahead! 2017 is shaping up to be the year of the superhero. Not only are movie superheroes setting records and dominating at the box office (we’re still obsessed with Wonder Woman!), but they’re taking over fall TV as well. From new shows, like The Gifted and Marvel’s Runaways, to some old returning favorites like Jessica Jones, masked heroes are all over the small screen. And we’re not complaining. There’s nothing we love more than watching our favorite TV stars save the world again and again. This week, all FOUR of CW’s superhero shows are returning, finally giving us some answers after all the cliffhangers they left dangling last spring. They’re also planning another major crossover event, bringing all…

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J.D. Salinger and Other Reluctantly Famous: 5 Authors Who Stayed Out of the Public Eye

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From Stephen King to J.K. Rowling, there are plenty of recognizable authors who regularly interact with both the press and the public. But what about the ones who aren’t quite as willing to step into the limelight? More than a few authors have chosen to eschew the fame completely, sometimes even living in solitude instead of engaging with the world. The most well-known of these reclusive authors is easily J.D. Salinger, who also happens to be the topic of the recently released Rebel in the Rye. Salinger wrote 5 books over the course of his career, as well as dozens of short stories. He’s most famous for Catcher in the Rye, of course, his coming-of-age novel about angsty teen Holden…

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Nicole Krauss’ Forest Dark, Celeste Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere and Other Awesome Reads by Female Authors

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We fell in love with author Nicole Krauss as soon as we read her 2005 novel, The History of Love. Since then, she has only continued to impress us with her thoughtful, heartfelt stories that grapple with real life issues. Her latest book, Forest Dark, came out on September 12th with Harper, and we’ve been thinking about it ever since. Forest Dark tells the story of two lost individuals who both end up in Tel Aviv, Israel, seeking some larger understanding about their lives. One is Jules Epstein, a retired lawyer who travels across the world after both his parents die and his marriage ends. The other is a young, well known novelist who’s trying to find her muse, as well as…

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Dan Brown’s Origin and New October Releases from the Biggest Names in Books

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Dan Brown’s new book Origin is among the biggest names in literature that have returned with new books sure to spice up your October.  Bestselling authors in every genre have something new to offer this month.  Here are 10 books you can’t afford to miss in what Vox calls “prestige book season”: Origin, Dan Brown (October 3, 2017) The author of The Da Vinci Code returns with a new Robert Langdon book. This time Langdon is at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao in Spain, for the unveiling of a major scientific breakthrough by one of his former students. But when things go terribly wrong, Langdon finds himself on another quest filled with symbols, puzzles and clues that only a mind as…

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‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’: Why We’re Mourning Tom Petty

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Legendary rocker Tom Petty died earlier this week of cardiac arrest at the age of 66. Since the ‘70s, Petty and his band The Heartbreakers have been putting their own unique spin on classic rock, producing hit after hit, including songs like Last Dance with Mary Jane and Into the Great Wide Open. Most of us have been moved by Petty’s music at some point in our lives. Just try and listen to Free Fallin’ without singing along to every line. Over the years he’s been writing and performing, Petty has cemented himself as one of the greatest rockers of his generation. We’re pretty devastated over the news of his death, though we’re trying to take comfort in the fact that…

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Say Farewell to Scandal, The Middle, New Girl and Mindy Project: Books to Remember Our Favorite Departing TV Shows

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It’s always bittersweet to say goodbye to our favorite TV shows, especially after spending years falling in love with the characters and their lives. And while we hate to see one get canceled (#StillBitterAboutDeadwood), it’s also not easy to watch a beloved show come to an end by choice. At least they get to do it on their own terms though, giving us all a sense of much needed closure. This year we have to bid farewell to some great ones. These shows have been with us season after season, introducing us to quirky heroines, offbeat families, and kickass powerhouses. We’re definitely sad to see them go, and we’re already searching for a way to fill the void. For us…

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‘Battle of the Sexes’: Books Inspired by Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs

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When Billie Jean King trounced Bobby Riggs in the legendary 1973 tennis match now referred to as the “Battle of the Sexes,” she wasn’t just winning a game, she was staking a claim for female athletes everywhere. The story of that iconic match – and what it meant for females players – is at the heart of the new Emma Stone and Steve Carrell film, Battle of the Sexes. Premiering on September 22nd, Battle of the Sexes dives into the lives of both Bobby Riggs and Billie Jean King, and how much was at stake for both of them during the match, despite the over-the-top spectacle that surrounded the events. Not only did 55-year-old Riggs taunt King and all female…

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‘How to Get Away With Murder’: Books That Keep You Guessing Who’s Next

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Soapy and twisty, one of our favorites, How to Get Away With Murder, is everything you could want out of a Shonda Rhimes-helmed show. Complicated defense attorney Annalise Keating is the glue that holds it all together as she kicks ass in the courtroom, deals with her crazy and meddling students, and tries not to crack under the pressure of all those murders. Played by Davis, Annalise is the type of character we don’t quite fully like (or hate), but who we’re still rooting for anyway. Season 4 airs tonight on ABC and we’re already taking bets on just who might end up murdered this year. Davis was nominated for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series for this year’s 69th Emmy…

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The Latest Trend: 8 Book Trends from 2017 You Absolutely Can’t Miss!

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It’s one thing to write a popular novel, but it’s another thing for a novel to hit ‘trending’ status. Whether it’s due to a scandal or strong word-of-mouth, these are the books that create so much online buzz that it drives readers straight to the bookstore. We’re definitely interested in what makes something trend, which is why we’ve rounded up 8 of our favorite ‘trending’ books from 2017: Norse Mythology, Neil Gaiman  With 2.6 million follows on Twitter, Gaiman certainly has a large fanbase. So when he announced that he was releasing a new book that dealt with the Norse gods and their stories, his readers went wild. It doesn’t hurt that the book has echoes of American Gods, Gaiman’s…

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John Green’s ‘Turtles All the Way Down’ is Finally Here!

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OMG, it’s happening! Fans have been waiting 5 years for young adult author John Green to publish a new book, and now that wait is finally over. His new novel, Turtles All the Way Down, comes out October 10th (with Dutton Books for Young Readers), and it’s already dominating all the pre-order charts. Green’s last book, The Fault in Our Stars, became in international sensation and a hit movie starring Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort. About teens falling in love as they struggle with life-threatening cancer, the novel reached the kind of popularity that most authors only dream of. But Green is used to fame – in addition to being an award-winning author, he’s also one half of the crazy popular…

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How to Get Away With Murder: 5 Reads on Annalise Keating’s Fictional Bookshelf

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It’s time for another fictional bookshelf, where we imagine the books our favorite characters might have lining their shelves. Since it’s also Emmy week here at Booktrib, we wanted to pick an Emmy-nominated performance we’re most definitely rooting for. The choice was easy – Viola Davis’s Annalise Keating from ABC’s smash hit, How to Get Away with Murder. Soapy and twisty, HTGAWM is everything you could want out of a Shonda Rhimes-helmed show. Complicated defense attorney Annalise Keating is the glue that holds it all together as she kicks ass in the courtroom, deals with her crazy and meddling students, and tries not to crack under the pressure of all those murders. Played by Davis, Annalise is the type of…

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‘Paving the Way’: Historical Emmy Firsts

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The 69th Emmy Awards air this Sunday, September 17th on CBS, and we’re already predicting the winners. There are a lot of first-time nominations this year, including big names like Reese Witherspoon for Big Little Lies, and Robert De Niro for The Wizard of Lies, as well as some relative newcomers, like Shannon Purser for Stranger Things (or, as you probably know her, Barb). We have no idea who will end up taking home prizes on the big night, but all these new nominations have got us thinking about Emmy firsts – those few stars who have paved the way for so many others by being the first to win the coveted award. The very first ever Emmy winner was Shirley Dinsdale, a…

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Top 5 Reasons to Binge Watch Emmy Nominated ‘The Handmaids Tale’ This Week

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Hulu‘s adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s iconic novel, The Handmaid’s Tale,  premiered on April 26 and Elisabeth Moss, who plays Offred, is nominated for an Emmy in the Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series category.  Alexis Bledel (known for her role on Gilmore Girls) won her first Emmy in an early award’s presentation for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series. You may remember Atwood’s book from your high school English class, or simply because it’s still one of the best books ever written. While some of our standard required reading tomes feel dated, The Handmaid’s Tale is a fresh and relevant story that cautions against a horrifying totalitarian future. Despite being written over 30 years ago, it still feels distressingly…

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Still Winning at 50!: Longevity in Literature and Film

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What makes a book have that kind of longevity? For some, film or TV adaptations have managed to keep alive stories that might otherwise have become lost over the years. Others are award winners, or repeatedly taught in schools, being reintroduced to new readers every year. But all of these stories share at least one quality: they’re moving and inspiring, capturing some kind of magic that never seems to fade. It’s rare for a book to be printed more than once, and even rarer for a story to last multiple generations. But, there are definitely certain books that we all turn to again and again, speaking to readers regardless of the era. In honor of these books with longevity, we’re…

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