Author

Carole Claps

Carole Claps has 13 articles published.

has been in the business of show business for more than 25 years having been the go-to person for press and marketing at leading regional theaters and for independent producers of stage and screen, including the late 20th Century Fox producer, Henry Weinstein. Claps was the on-air theater critic for local cable television, and senior arts editor for 10 Connecticut newspapers for which she was the recipient of numerous national and regional awards for her writing and layout design. Having spent the better part of the last decade working in New York City for Fortune 500 companies, she is glad to be back home, working locally and volunteering at area nonprofit arts organizations.

October is National Cookbook Month – Get Cooking!

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It’s fall and in most regions it’s beginning to get a little chilly in the evenings. Sweaters are starting to come out of the mothballs they’ve been resting in all summer long, blankets are being tucked into beds once again, decorative throws are being tossed on sofas, and logs from outside are being brought in for a crackling evening fire in the fireplace or wood-burning stove. If all this coziness is making you want to grab a cookbook and experiment with a new recipe for a hearty soup or stew, pot roast, chili (meatless or otherwise), steaming, in-season vegetables such as kale, butternut squash, turnips, brussels sprouts or broccoli, you are not alone. If you love to cook, as I…

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‘What Happened’ When BookTrib Attended Hillary Clinton’s Book Signing in Brookfield, CT

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“…I was up on a wire without a net. Now I’m letting my guard down.”                      ~ Hillary Rodham Clinton Whether you voted for her or not, like her or don’t like her, the fact remains that Hillary Rodham Clinton is a part of the fabric of our American history. A cultural icon, former First Lady, New York Senator and Secretary of State, Clinton also became the first-ever woman to be nominated for President of the United States by a major political party. Though she may have not shattered that glass ceiling as many had hoped, she sure put a gazillion cracks in it.  And, except for former President Barack Obama, Clinton received more votes – 65,844,610 – than any other presidential…

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Are You Living the Oola Lifestyle? You should be!

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oola life dave braun troy amdahl

The Oola Life 1 BUS. 2 GUYS. 50 STATES. 1 MILLION DREAMS. Rolling into a city near you! Ever heard of the book, Chicken Soup for the Soul®? It’s one of the world’s most recognized titles of all time. Well, Oola is being called the “Chicken Soup for the Next Generation.” As a matter of fact, Jack Canfield, co-creator of the Chicken Soup for the Soul® series, said, “Oola for Women is the success formula for a new generation…Dave Braun and Troy Amdahl will change the world with Oola.” That’s a pretty great endorsement don’t you think? So, how do I get Oola? Good question! First you need to know what Oola is. According to Troy Amdahl (@OolaGuru) and Dave…

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Who’s Whispering Sweet Nothings in the President’s Ear?

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In Dr. Lauren A. Wright’s latest book, On Behalf of the President: Presidential Spouses and White House Communications Strategy Today (Praeger, April 18, 2016), she argues that first ladies are far more than a decorative political spouse, but rather an essential team player who is mobilized to enhance the public reputation of a presidential candidate and their policy agenda and, according to her data, they make a profound influence on public opinion. No first lady better typifies this than Michelle Obama who made more speeches and public appearances in her first six years than any other presidential spouse in history. The book also documents the growing presence of the presidents’ wives in the communications strategies of the last three administrations (Clinton, Bush…

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Recognizing the Political Importance of the President’s Spouse

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The Popularity of America’s First Ladies: First ladies have become as influential in American politics as elected officials. More than any other time in history, the first lady now bears responsibilities tantamount to a high-ranking cabinet member. In her new book, On Behalf of the President: Presidential Spouses and White House Communications Strategy Today, Lauren A. Wright, Ph.D., delves into the debate about what makes presidents and presidential candidates likable, what draws public support to their agendas, and why spouses appear to be more effective in these arenas than other surrogates, or even the presidents themselves. Read Dr. Wright’s interview with Parade magazine as she discusses the popularity of our country’s first ladies. What Melania’s Absence Says About Trump’s Campaign:…

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VIDEO: Watch Greg O’Brien in NOVA PBS’ ‘Can Alzheimer’s Be Stopped?’

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Watch as “investigators untangle the cause of Alzheimer’s and race to develop a cure.” Alzheimer’s disease strikes at the core of what makes us human: our capacity to think, to love and to remember. The cause of Alzheimer’s ­ and whether it can be stopped ­ is one of the greatest medical mysteries of our time. Alzheimer’s ravages the minds of over 40 million victims worldwide, stripping them of their memories and often their dignity on a poignant march that can lead to death. Join investigators as they gather clues and attempt to reconstruct the molecular chain of events that ultimately leads to dementia, and follow key researchers in the field who have helped to develop the leading theories of the…

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Greg O’Brien: Learning to Live, and Not Die, with Alzheimer’s Disease

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There’s hardly a family in America that hasn’t been touched by Alzheimer’s disease. More than 5.4 million people live with the disease and 500,000 die from it each year. Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging and without being able to cure or prevent it, in the next 15 years it is expected to exceed heart disease and cancer as the leading cause of death. This could bankrupt Medicare. Public awareness of Alzheimer’s—a balance between science, medicine and faith—needs to change dramatically in anticipation of the looming Alzheimer’s epidemic that is headed for the baby boomer generation. This is why November has been designated as National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month. Begun in 1983 by President Ronald Reagan, who would wage his…

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War Photographer Robert Cunningham Honors our Veterans

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Few civilians have captured the service of our active military and veterans as vividly as embedded war photographer Robert L. Cunningham. He has worked throughout Afghanistan, primarily beside the U.S. Army’s 1st Infantry, 10th Mountain, and 101st Airborne Divisions. He recently returned from his fourth embedment in Afghanistan and was there during the recent outbreak in the North. “No greater honor will I ever have than walking outside the wire with our troops,” says Cunningham referring to the military term for being on the front lines. Cunningham’s work has taken him aboard an underway US Navy submarines, into zero-gravity in low-earth orbit, and to more than 450 cities in 25 countries. His work also appears in multiple libraries and museums. He…

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Thanking the mothers who serve

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When a Mom kisses her children goodbye, it’s usually to reassure them all is well. She’s only going away for a little while; it might be a short business trip, a quick run to the market, or a night out with her friends. It’s hard to think about Mom leaving home for a year or more—perhaps never to return—because she’s going off to fight a war in some far-away part of the world. Most of us can don’t even want to imagine it. She’s not there for the glory. She’s there fighting for the freedoms and democracy we all enjoy and sometimes take for granted. She’s risking her life to ensure a safe future for her children and those of…

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Four star-studded books, connected by the glitzy thread we know as Hollywood

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As screenwriter Raymond Chandler once said, “Anyone who doesn’t like Hollywood is either crazy or sober.” The history of Tinseltown as it is known, with all its worship of youth and beauty, is linked to the nation’s history. In some ways, not much has changed since the first silent motion picture was put up on the silver screen at the dawn of the 20th century. Now come four star-studded books, all connected by the glitzy thread we know as Hollywood. Different in theme and tone, each will add some glamour and pizzazz to your reading. In Tinseltown: Murder, Morphine, and Madness at the Dawn of Hollywood (Harper, October 2014), William J. Mann brings one of the most infamous Hollywood homicide…

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Joan Rivers: The tart-tongued trailblazer was also a bestselling author

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Joan Rivers was bawdy, obnoxious, loud, sometimes crude, and always irreverent. Love her or hate her, no one can deny she was a true original. With her acerbic wit and signature New Yawker raspy voice, she pushed the boundaries of comedy like no other female comic before her or since, and opened doors for others like Roseanne Barr, Whoopi Goldberg, Sarah Silverman and Kathy Griffin. The iconic comedienne, actress, writer, director and talk show host, who was also a bestselling author, passed away on September 4 in New York City at the age of 81. From her first appearance in 1965 on The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson, to her last stand-up gig the night before she went into cardiac…

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Hollywood Makeup Artist: makeup counter to Oscars

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Do you ever stay for the credits at the end of a film? Most don’t, but I do. And for one very good reason. My younger sister, LuAnn Claps. When she was a young girl, and unbeknownst to me at the time, she would go into my bathroom after I had left for a date and play with my makeup, which I sloppily left spread out on the vanity. She was, and is still very neat and organized, so I never had a clue that those sweet little fingers of hers where actually making their way into my private stash and on to her beautiful face while I was out for the evening. I should have realized something was up…

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Heeeere’s Oscar!

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I have not been nominated for an Academy Award this year. Or last year. OK, never. But I could have been. If only. If I had been given a film to star in, had the looks of Cate Blanchett, the body of Jennifer Lawrence, and the talent of Meryl Streep. That could be me on the red carpet. Sigh. Instead, come Sunday night, I’ll be home, sipping my Diet Coke, sitting starry-eyed in front of the TV in my sweats (does Kohl’s count as designer wear?) wrapped in my favorite blanket waiting for the beautiful people to arrive. I’ll have stellar company—approximately 50 million people will tune in to ceremony from the Academy Awards—more commonly known as the Oscars—Sunday, March…

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