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War

“Ohio” by Stephen Markley Introduces New Voice(s) in American Fiction

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Ohio by Stephen Markley (Simon & Schuster) deserves to be only the first of a series because its characters are worth more than one book, and the story of their America is worth more than one look. This sprawling, spiraling novel begins one summer night in 2013, as four former high school classmates are about to meet again in New Canaan, their Rust Belt Ohio town. Each is traveling from far corners, each bearing memories that must be obeyed and secrets that will be revealed. The book is narrated from each of their viewpoints in a gripping saga that slowly builds into a symphony that hits all the right notes. New Canaan is a snapshot of so many places in…

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Jewish History is Revisited in Martha Hall Kelly’s ‘Lilac Girls’

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If you missed the release of Lilac Girls, now is the time to buy the paperback. It is historical fiction based on true and harrowing events during World War II. For me, the Holocaust has always been mostly about how the Jews were prosecuted; a devastating time in our history across the world. But of course the Jewish people were not the only ones who were affected. Author Martha Hall Kelly gets up close and personal with Kasia, a young Polish girl with Jewish ancestry who is completing secret missions for the underground anti-war efforts and is captured by the Gestapo with her sister and her mother. One of these unforgettable characters is Herta, an out of work, German doctor…

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‘No Good Reasons At All’: A Literary View of the Full Implications of War

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Reckless saber-rattling with an unstable despot and growing nuclear power in North Korea, sixteen years of fighting in Afghanistan, insurmountable issues in the Middle East, irrational bigotry and hatred consuming far too many, an enemy power’s blatant interference with the sovereignty of our electoral process, terrorism both domestic and foreign, indiscriminately striking every corner of the world, American soldiers dying in far away places we didn’t even know we had a presence, an administration neither aware or concerned with the potential implications of entering into war and by all appearances far too eager to do so – all issues that take place in our country. We live in challenging times. Given the implications of modern warfare, if we make a…

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Elliot Ackerman Has Endless Inspiration for ‘Dark At the Crossing’

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Here is an author whose fiction cannot be separated from his life, or, if you indulge me, whose novels are based on his life. Once a marine, with an impressive five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, Elliot Ackerman is now a journalist based in Istanbul, from where he has been covering the Syrian Civil War since 2013. Dark at the Crossing, Ackerman’s sophomore novel, after his much-heralded debut novel, Green on Blue, like its predecessor, deals with characters trapped in the middle of a brutal conflict. The conflict here is not just the obvious Syrian debacle, but also the one of a failed marriage. Ackerman comments on the genesis of the novel as an insight he had while…

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Gaynor and Webb’s ‘Last Christmas in Paris’ Mixes Relationships and Tragedy

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At BookTrib, we are constantly searching for the best ways to connect readers with writers, opening their eyes and worlds to fresh ideas! This is how we came across a wonderful group known as the Tall Poppies, who are not only avid readers, but extremely talented writers as well! This week’s Tall Poppies review of Last Christmas in Paris relays a beautifully crafted story love and dreams in the wake of war human tragedy. War changes everything–individuals, relationships, priorities, dreams– so it’s not surprising that stories set in wartime are so popular and, in this case, so engrossing. In Last Christmas in Paris, best friends Will and Tom head off to fight the Germans, leaving behind Will’s sister, Evie, and, soon…

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When Hollywood Comes Knocking: Turning a Thriller Into a Major TV Event

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Now that my military thriller The Red Line has reached the bookstores and people are becoming aware, Hollywood is working on turning it into a major television event.  Since then, I’ve been frequently asked: ‘what gives a thriller the potential to become a great movie or television series? From what I can see, the answer is actually a simple one— the same thing that makes it a novel people can’t put down. Relentless, edge-of-your-seat action and interesting, compelling characters are what draw in reader; the same will also draw in viewers. Fortunately, at least according to the critics, that’s exactly the book we’ve written.  The Red Line contains characters you fall in love with and exceptionally visual action that never stops. So we’re…

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Trailblazing Author Mike Bond Answers One Question about ‘Assassins’

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Mike Bond writes with an urgency few other authors have been able to maintain. Mailer was able to do it to some degree. Tom Wolfe and Hunter Thompson had their ears to the ground. But Mike Bond has assumed this mantle for the 21st century. His writings have covered the most war-torn corners of the world to the familiar, rugged shores of Maine. Assassins (Mandevilla Press, December 8, 2016) covers a war that continues to define generations and it’s his most ambitious novel yet. With the Middle East being a melting pot of complicated strife, Bond maps a decades-long war through a military and cultural lens over several generations and characters. For our ‘One Question and Answer’ series I asked…

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Video: Missed It? Interview with Mike Bond, Author of HOLY WAR

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Special offers brought to you by Enjoy HOLY WAR in eBook format provided by bookshout! at a special discount of 99 cents for BookTrib members. This discount is available for a limited time. You can access your eBook on the web, from your smartphone or tablet.  For a direct link,  text HOLYWAR  to 67076. Texting is within the US only. HOLY WAR The Battle of Beirut is worse than Hell, an irrational maelstrom of implacable hatreds and inconceivable suffering, of screaming bombs and exploding shells, crashing buildings, sniper battles, and deadly ambushes. Neill, a war correspondent on a secret mission for Britain’s MI6 intelligence agency, is trying to find Mohammed, a Hezbollah terrorist leader who may be willing to stop the slaughter and…

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Correspondent Mike Bond asks: Can we war less?

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Lebanon was a paradise when I first arrived there as a young man. The golden sun and brilliant sea, the ancient streets, the hubbub of cultures, the food and wines, the tanned and sensual young women, the perfume of many million flowers, the pine hills and cold white peaks, all imbued it with a near-sacred substance. This, I felt, is a place where all peoples come together, vibrant with history, wisdom, lust, and delight. Civil war soon turned Lebanon into a battlefield of smashed buildings and bloody streets. Syria was one of the loveliest places on our planet. Damascus, Homs and other cities so old that every handful of dust was thick with centuries of human flesh and blood. Iridescent…

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So, what is it really like to serve in Afghanistan?

in Non-Fiction by

Through glossy photos, pull-out literature, and writings by Steven Hartov, readers start from the outset of servicemembers’ deployment and finish not only with the service members’ heartfelt return, but with a deeper understanding of their experience in Afghanistan. Robert Cunningham’s high-gloss, high-definition photographs will inspire readers through his portrayal of what our brave servicemembers feel and see every day, on and off the battlefield. With detail, emotion, and conviction, the narrative illuminates everything from the tears left on the tarmac as a service member deploys, their downtime, life beyond the protection of the base, iron horses (helicopters, planes, and armored trucks), the military chaplain, what happens to wounded soldiers, how fallen service members are brought home, and other aspects of…

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