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W.W. Norton

Summer Reading Extravaganza: WIN 15 Fabulous Books!

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Do we really need an excuse to give away a big pile of books? We definitely do not! So since we’re overflowing with books in the BookTrib office, we wanted to share the wealth and keep your summer reading going strong. From Young Adult, to thriller, to historical romance and everything in between we’ve got you covered! So ENTER HERE to WIN this awesome pile of books!                                                     ENTER TO WIN!

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Literary Crushes: The Romantic Leads in Books Who Are Worthy of Your Affection!

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It’s no secret that a bunch of the books we consider uber-romantic are actually kind of creepy. Tweens found Edward Cullen irresistible, despite the fact that he has an over 100 year age difference from his 17-year-old girlfriend. Grown women find Mr. Rochester’s Byronic shtick super sexy, even though he literally locked his wife in an attic for years and dressed up like a creepy “gypsy fortune-teller” to trick his new squeeze into revealing her feelings for him. While we as readers can’t help who we’re desperately attracted to, a lot of the time even the romantic leads who aren’t bad boys still have glaringly problematic issues that I just can’t get over. So, here are some options for literary…

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Heat Index: 5 Hot New Books All About the Heart of the Matter

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In the fast-paced society we live in today, sometimes we forget to slow down and enjoy what life has to offer us. But there are times that we’re reminded of the important things in life like family, friends and love. Whether you’re single, dating or completely off the market, these five hot new books may be just what your heart needs right now. Date-onomics: How Dating Became a Lopsided Numbers Game, Jon Birger (Workman Publishing, August 2015) “The author…provides fascinating evidence to show how and why dating and mating culture in America has changed in the 21st century.” —Kirkus Reviews Heat Index: There’s a perfectly good reason as to why you haven’t met the man of your dreams yet and Date-onomics has…

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The Meal You’ll Want to Cook Tonight from Dinner for Two

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Since moving in with my carb-loving other half, I may have overestimated our appetites. To be fair, I’ve been known to put away an entire meatball parm in record time, and he’s recently acquired the nickname “the compactor” due to his ability to crush meals. However, this doesn’t mean that we can keep up with all the leftovers. It’s just too much for two people and heating up last night’s dinner gets old fast. During the busy work week, I often find that the leftovers are no longer all that fresh when I finally get around to freezing them. And I won’t even mention the mysterious mold factory you find a week later. Instead, we want easy recipes with zero…

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Review: The Mad Feast is This Year’s Fun and Frantic Cookbook

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Matthew Gavin Frank’s previous book was about the discovery of the giant squid, and he has also written memoirs of working at a marijuana farm and an Italian vineyard. Given that unconventional publishing history and his background—he spent 20 years in the restaurant industry but is also a poet and creative writing teacher—it’s no surprise that his new book about America’s signature foods is no straightforward, one-genre affair. Instead, Frank describes The Mad Feast (Liveright; November 9, 2015) as a “spastic, lyrical anti-cookbook cookbook of sorts that also may be a fun and digressive revisionist take on U.S. history.” Indeed, it is the off-the-wall blend of memoir, travel, history and fiction that makes the book unique. This is the cookbook…

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Sisters Tackle the Surprisingly Simple Desserts in Sweet Envy

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In my opinion, the best part of dinner is always dessert. I would eat dessert first, if it was socially acceptable. I am essentially addicted to sugar. I’m the type of person who will go to the convenience store at night in my pajamas for a package of Oreos or some gummy worms. Even though I love sweets, I can barely make brownies from the box. It is quite unfortunate. But, to my delight, my younger sister will soon be studying baking and pastries at culinary school. So, I bake vicariously through my little sis. In Seton Rossini’s new cookbook Sweet Envy: Deceptively Easy Desserts, Designed to Steal the Show (The Countryman Press; October 5, 2015) she offers recipes that…

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Fear the Walking Dead Prep: Snacks to Survive the Zombie Apocalypse

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Hungry people in zombie shows have been doing it all wrong. I’m often shaking my fist at these fictional characters and yelling at the TV, wondering why Carl from The Walking Dead is so excited about acquiring a stinking can of chocolate pudding. He probably almost had his arm chewed off just to get it, not to mention that those food runs they’re constantly making are dangerous and produce nothing but boring processed foods. They probably should have just been making jerky all along. I’m not sure how they spent their time pre-zombie apocalypse, but if they were smart, they could get ahead of the game by churning out sweet and salty, perfectly-preserved meats. Now that AMC’s spin-off, Fear the…

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Coming of age on the road to rapture

in Fiction by

It’s hard to convince a thirty-something woman to willingly revisit the teenage experience, even another girl’s story and especially with the added complexity of today’s technology. A thirty-something woman knows too well what awaits her in those pages—self-doubt, self-wonder, and lack of foresight to start; the fine balance between limitless possibility and assured impossibility; the question of sexual attractiveness; smart phones. (Thank goodness those weren’t an option in 1996.) But despite whatever implications a coming-of-age story might suggest, veteran short story writer Mary Miller has managed to portray hers in a way that is pleasantly prickly and not at all expected, in this thirty-something’s opinion. In her debut novel, The Last Days of California (Norton/Liveright, January), Miller delivers a succinct, page-turning…

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