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Virginia Woolf

Happy Birthday Virginia Woolf!: Celebrate Her Life with Previews of Her 10 Greatest Works

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Happy birthday, Virginia Woolf! Born in 1882, the English author, critic and essayist would have been 136 today. Over the course of her life, Woolf wrote some of the best and most inspirational feminist texts to ever be written. A Room of One’s Own written in 1929, was perhaps her best known essay; she argued for giving female writers space, both literally and figuratively, and to make their voices heard in a world where men’s writing was and still is the standard. Woolf’s books remain popular in classrooms, libraries, and on personal bookshelves. Here, in celebration of her life and the movements inspired, we have  previews of her 10 greatest works: Between the Acts To the Lighthouse A Room of One’s Own…

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11 Must-Read Feminist Books from the Past 100 Years

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What does feminism mean to you? Over the years, the definition of the word “feminism” has changed. For the record, that definition, according to Webster’s Dictionary, is: “the belief that men and women should have equal opportunities.” That seems simple enough, but for some, feminism has become a controversial—even unnecessary concept. Whatever feminism means to you, it’s worth taking a look back at how and why the movement developed, beginning as far back as the early 1900s, and the writers and feminist books that continue to influence our lives today—whether we know it or not. With so much feminist literature out there, this list is not exhaustive. Add your go-to feminist book to the comments. Together We Rise, The Women’s March…

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Q&A with David Plante, Author of ‘American Stranger’ and ‘Difficult Women’

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Brought up in a secularized Jewish household on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, Nancy Green knows little about her parents’ past. She knows they were World War II Jewish refugees who were able to escape Germany with precious family heirlooms that are constant reminders of a lost life and a world about which Nancy knows very little. In David Plante’s novel, American Stranger, (Delphinium Books; January 9, 2018) the main character, Nancy, has a longing for some kind of spiritual connection that first leads her into an encounter with a Hasidic Jewish man who, unable to find meaning in his own religion, has taken vows to become a monk. She then becomes romantically involved with Yvon, a Catholic college student in…

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Early Bird Books: 10 of Our Favorite First Lines in Literature

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From Melville to Didion, these first sentences created lasting and notable impressions. Some of literature’s most iconic lines come to us within the first paragraphs of our favorite novels. They are the hooks onto which we latch, and the springboards that launch us further into the narrative. There’s a reason these words make up some of the most quotable lines in literature—readers simply can’t get them out of their heads. Take a look below to see some of our favorite opening lines. While first impressions can be tough, they won us over in just a single sentence. “You better not never tell nobody but God.”  The Color Purple By Alice Walker Set in the 1930s, The Color Purple details the…

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Presenting: The Real Housewives of Classic Literature!

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Everyone loves The Real Housewives! OK, to be fair, not everyone is aware of how magical the Real Housewives can be on occasion. While a lot of people find them irritating, where else are you going to find crazy moments where weird rich women debase themselves like insane animals in a menagerie for we the people to marvel at? No matter what your opinion is on The Real Housewives franchise, it’s hard to deny that they’re a bonafide cultural phenomenon. Love them or hate them, their hilarious quips, wild cat fights and generally unblinking attitude towards affluence are here to stay. So, if we were to cast a new season of Real Housewives, populated by some of the most desperate…

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Happy 134th Birthday to Virginia Woolf

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“Words, English words, are full of echoes, memories, associations…” So spake Virginia Woolf, in a 1937 recording for a BBC radio series called Words Fail Me. On January 25, Woolf’s 134th birthday, it’s curious to listen to the physical voice of an author who gave a voice to the voiceless, helping to give birth to an entire literary movement along the way. The recording, an excerpt of a talk titled “Craftsmanship” uncovered in 2013, sounds hauntingly normal for a woman whose imaginative stream-of-consciousness novels have been read by pretty much every high school student in the United States for the past 50 years. On her birthday, it’s worth listening to her musings on the nature of words, which she was…

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Not afraid of Virginia Woolf? 3 Novels to celebrate her birthday

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Happy birthday, Virginia Woolf! You turn 133 on January 25 (which is funny, because you don’t look a day over 125). How can you celebrate the timeless author’s big day? You can read some of her great works, of course. Or, for something a bit different, you can treat yourself to some novels that feature Woolf as a character. Here are some of our favorites: Vanessa and Her Sister by Priya Parmar Parmar’s second novel brings the Bloomsbury group to vibrant life. Vanessa and Her Sister is Vanessa Bell’s imagined diary, incorporating letters and telegrams. In 1905, the four Stephen children have recently been orphaned. Vanessa, the eldest, strives to keep the family together in their London home while focusing…

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My dear, you SHOULD give a damn

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Lists are everywhere. Books are everywhere. So it makes sense that lists about books are omnipresent. There are lists of the best books ever written, the worst books ever written, the books you should read before you die, the books you should read to make sure you never die (immortal vampires, anyone?), and everything in between. I hate to be the one to break it to you that it is impossible for you to read all the books currently in publication, let alone the thousands coming down the pike. Even with that new-fangled app that purports to let you read a novel in 90 minutes (that’s a gripe for another time), you simply won’t get to turn every page of…

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