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vietnam war

Tall Poppy Review: Loyalties Shift in “Garden of Lies”

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In 1943, as the prologue of Garden of Lies (Open Road Media) opens, a young woman named Sylvie succumbs to her first stirrings of true passion—with the handyman, Nikos, instead of her rich, older husband. She soon discovers she’s pregnant. Sylvie prays that the baby is her husband’s, but when the baby looks just like Nikos, she panics. Nikos is long gone—her husband had not been blind to the affair and fired him. So when a hospital fire breaks out and the mother of another infant perishes, Sylvie impulsively uses the cover of the smoky evacuation to swap her infant with that woman’s daughter, who will be easier to pass off as her husband’s. You won’t like Sylvie much for this…

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“Soldiers of a Foreign War:” A Look Inside Daily Life of a Soldier

in Fiction by

I wrote Soldiers of a Foreign War so that people could have a new appreciation for the names on the walls of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. So people could truly connect more personally with the stories of veterans.  Charles McNair served as an operating room technician in Vietnam, and though it has been many years since his service finished, he thinks of the war every day. Soldiers of a Foreign War meshes McNair’s own experience from the medical side of the war, exposing the stark consequences and brutality of America’s occupation in Vietnam while crafting a thoroughly researched and engaging tale that intersects the lives of many other soldiers of his own creation. The novel follows a variety of characters including men…

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‘Yonkers Yonkers!’: Patricia Vaccarino’s New Book Explores Racial Tensions and Friendship during Woodstock

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Author and PR specialist Patricia Vaccarino’s new book, YONKERS Yonkers! A Story of Race and Redemption, is an enriching and beautiful narrative of friendship, breaking social boundaries, and music. In the time of Woodstock, the Vietnam War, the Rolling Stones and more, YONKERS Yonkers! looks at social and racial conventions of a tumultuous and changing time period. Concetta Mary Bernadette Colangelo, aka Cookie, is not your typical protagonist. Small-time drug dealer, and big-time trouble, she may be a self-described gangster, but there’s nothing she wants more than to go to Woodstock and meet Alan ‘Blind Owl’ Wilson from the band Canned Heat, whom she thinks she looks like, and believes will understand her in a way no one else can. With a mentally ill mother,…

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BookTrib Q & A with Marcelino Truong, Author-Illustrator of Graphic Novel ‘Saigon Calling’

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Marcelino Truong, a self-taught illustrator who works on graphic novels, has been growing as an artist for years and wants to share his growth with us. In this exclusive interview, we learn more about some of his recent works, taboo subjects, and his take on the media.  BookTrib: You’re a self-taught illustrator, and the images you have in both graphic novels are very particular, and sometimes deal with very heavy subject matter, which is reminiscent of MAUS. Did your artistic abilities grow organically in the media of drawing for graphic novels, or did you start off drawing, or designing somewhere else first? Marcelino Truong: Both my graphic novels are the result of many years of experience as a self-taught illustrator…

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‘No Good Reasons At All’: A Literary View of the Full Implications of War

in Fiction by

Reckless saber-rattling with an unstable despot and growing nuclear power in North Korea, sixteen years of fighting in Afghanistan, insurmountable issues in the Middle East, irrational bigotry and hatred consuming far too many, an enemy power’s blatant interference with the sovereignty of our electoral process, terrorism both domestic and foreign, indiscriminately striking every corner of the world, American soldiers dying in far away places we didn’t even know we had a presence, an administration neither aware or concerned with the potential implications of entering into war and by all appearances far too eager to do so – all issues that take place in our country. We live in challenging times. Given the implications of modern warfare, if we make a…

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Interview with Sam Lightner, Jr., Author of ‘Heavy Green’

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Experienced climber Sam Lightner, Jr. talks with BookTrib about his latest book, Heavy Green. Heavy Green focuses on a little known CIA operation that could shift the outcome of the Vietnam War. Expertly researched, Heavy Green is a historical novel that shows a different side of the conflict at the time. In this interview, Lightner shares why that is and offers a new trajectory in how we should begin looking and discussing that period in our nation’s history.

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Walt Gragg Turns Realities of War into a Work of Fiction in ‘The Red Line’

in Fiction by

One of the questions I’m frequently asked about my World War III epic The Red Line, a novel about a major conflict between Russia and the United States, is – Why a war novel and why Russia? The answer is not a simple one. First let me say my hope is you find this is a story unlike any you have experienced. The Red Line is not just another techno-thriller intent on glorifying war and reveling over the latest military technology. The intent of the book is to focus on the only thing that matters in war – the people who find themselves facing it. This is an edge-of-your-seat story about ordinary people caught in extraordinary circumstances. There are no…

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Vietnam Operation Babylift’s 40th celebrates second chances

in Nonfiction by

On April 30, 1975, Saigon was mere days from falling. The communists were coming and it was a race to escape. In the midst of the turmoil, thousands of Vietnamese orphans, many of whom were fathered by American servicemen, were at risk until President Gerald Ford answered the pleas of international children’s organizations  and ordered the evacuation of nearly 3,000 children. Now, 40 years later, those who participated in the initiative celebrate the anniversary and reflect on the frantic days when saving children became a top priority. Perhaps most compelling is the story of flight attendant Jan Wollett, who was aboard the World Airways DC-8 cargo plane that delivered the first round of orphaned children to the United States. She…

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