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United States

One-Man Wrecking Ball Picks Up Vince Flynn Legacy

in Thrillers by

Kyle Mills opens his fourth Mitch Rapp thriller (since taking over the series following the passing of Vince Flynn in 2013) Red War (Atria) with Russian President Maxim Krupin standing in his Kremlin office looking down at the protestors filing into Red Square. The growing backlash and constant threat of being overthrown is annoying to Krupin, but it’s the inoperable brain cancer that he was secretly diagnosed with that proves most troubling. At first, Krupin’s symptoms are fairly minor and easy to hide. However, as the cancer worsens, so too do the neurological issues plaguing him, forcing him to rely on more drastic methods in order to conceal his rapidly declining health from the many threats he faces both at home…

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‘The Eves of Our Destruction’: Can Citizens be Ignorant and Free at the Same Time?

in Non-Fiction by

As authors, we tend to specialize in writing fiction or nonfiction. A few writers are able to successfully write both entertaining fiction and erudite nonfiction but in a terrible irony, increasingly, our society seems to be so easily manipulated in blurring the distinction. In 1816 in a letter to John Adams, Jefferson wrote, “bigotry is the disease of ignorance, of morbid minds; enthusiasm of the free and buoyant.” I have been wondering lately if it is possible to be free and ignorant at the same time. This is very troubling to me because in the last few years and particularly this year, what counts for knowledge and facts has been so blurred, I don’t think we can know the difference.…

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Walt Gragg Turns Realities of War into a Work of Fiction in ‘The Red Line’

in Fiction by

One of the questions I’m frequently asked about my World War III epic The Red Line, a novel about a major conflict between Russia and the United States, is – Why a war novel and why Russia? The answer is not a simple one. First let me say my hope is you find this is a story unlike any you have experienced. The Red Line is not just another techno-thriller intent on glorifying war and reveling over the latest military technology. The intent of the book is to focus on the only thing that matters in war – the people who find themselves facing it. This is an edge-of-your-seat story about ordinary people caught in extraordinary circumstances. There are no…

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Sherman Alexie’s ‘Hymn’ Touches on Politics, Popular Culture and Pain

in Potpourri by

BookTrib is partnering with Early Bird Books to bring you more great content, including this poem by Sherman Alexie, which addresses the current climate of injustice plaguing the United States.  “Hymn” Why do we measure people’s capacity To love by how well they love their progeny? That kind of love is easy. Encoded. Any lion can be devoted To its cubs. Any insect, be it prey Or predator, worships its own DNA. Like the wolf, elephant, bear, and bees, We humans are programmed to love what we conceive. That’s why it’s so shocking when a neighbor Drives his car into a pond and slaughter– Drowns his children. And that’s why we curse The mother who leaves her kids—her hearth— And never returns. That kind…

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Going South: 3 Books That Explore Life Below the Mason-Dixon Line

in Non-Fiction by

In The World’s Largest Man: A Memoir author Harrison Scott Key tries to explain the southern United States: “The South is a strange place, one that can’t be fit inside a movie, a place that dares you to simplify it, like a prime number, like a Bible story, like my father.” For our latest round of Shelfie picks, we return to our friends at Square Books, located in the historic town square of Oxford, Mississippi and boasting three separate buildings and its own café. Back in September, they gave us three great books to keep you up past your bedtime. This week manager Lyn Roberts is focusing on the rich tapestry of the South. South Toward Home: Travels in Southern…

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D-Day plus 70: A World War II veteran looks back

in Non-Fiction by

In 1944, US Army Signal Corps Cpl. Herbert F. Geller was serving as a radio repairman attached to the Eighth Army Air Force in Burtonwood, England. This is his reminiscence of D-Day. D-Day, the Allied invasion of France was no military secret in England before the real D-Day. We all heard on the radio and read in the British and American newspapers that a huge Allied invasion being organized in England was going to take place in June 1944. How could anyone in England not know that this was going to happen very soon? Anyone driving on M-1, the main highway through central England to the Channel, could see that one lane of the highway was blocked by hundreds or…

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