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Truman Capote

*NEW COLUMN* Chasing Phantoms: Copenhaver’s Debut, ‘Dodging and Burning’ is an ‘Hommage to Pulp Fiction’

in Thrillers by

One of the things that makes BookTrib special is our commitment to connecting readers to writers, editors and experts in the business of books! That is why we have partnered with the International Thriller Writers (ITW) to help discover debut thriller writers. Our new column features reviews by veteran editor, Neil Nyren. Nyren retired at the end of 2017 as the EVP, Associate Publisher, and Editor-in-Chief of G.P. Putnam’s Sons (a division of Penguin Random House). He is the winner of the 2017 Ellery Queen Award and over the course of his career,  has edited 294 New York Times bestsellers, including books by Larry King, Andy Rooney, Tom Clancy, Senator Harry Reid and Wayne Gretzky. We are thrilled to have Neil bring…

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Hemingway to Capote: Watching Our Favorite Writers Come to Life On-Screen

in Fiction by

Writers have a long history of showing up as characters in films. Sometimes those writers are real people interacting with history (like Hemingway!), and sometimes they’re made up characters, showing us exactly how Hollywood imagines the concept of the writer. Regardless, these writers usually have certain traits in common: they’re often tortured by their art, they prefer to be isolated from society in some way, and they LOVE whiskey. Of course, these are broad generalizations, and sometimes we do see writers who are mentally stable, well adjusted, and finding success without also finding a drinking problem – though it’s admittedly pretty rare. But no matter how a writer is portrayed, we’re always happy to see them on the screen. It…

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Fargo: The Best TV Show You Aren’t Watching

in Fiction by

It may have been easy to miss the Season 2 premiere of FX’s Fargo this past Monday. In a slew of other hotly anticipated autumn premieres over the past two weeks, like The Walking Dead, American Horror Story: Hotel, and Arrow, FX’s anthology series based on the Coen Brothers film of the same name may have snuck by unnoticed. However, a show as utterly flawless as Fargo deserves not only your weekly attention, but your love, your theorizing and every Emmy. Seriously, every single Emmy. There are a few special elements that set Fargo apart from its fall competition. For one, the simple, yet sharp, writing is so darkly hilarious that watching it actually makes you feel smarter. Secondly, there’s…

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The star wore Prada: How great fashion can save a lackluster film

in Fiction by

Any book lover has had the unique experience of watching one of your favorite novels come to life on the big screen. It’s a moment filled with fear that the story will be butchered, forever tainting your view of the book, and awe that you’re finally seeing something you’ve only ever pictured in your mind. I’ve watched some truly awful adaptations of my favorite books (I’m looking at you, The Time Traveler’s Wife) and some truly amazing ones (hello, Princess Bride). But sometimes the beauty of a movie can triumph regardless of what’s happening in the story. A character will put on a certain dress or suit and make a scene pop in a way that didn’t seem possible in…

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Here’s to you, Mr. Mailer

in Fiction by

It’s high praise when Joan Didion declares you the only person capable of writing a particular story. This is a woman who knows from voice. In her review of Norman Mailer’s 1979’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Executioner’s Song, Didion says, “I think no one but Mailer could have dared this book. The authentic Western voice, the voice heard [here], is one heard often in life but only rarely in literature.” Mailer, who died in 2007 at age 84, helped spearhead a movement known as “new journalism,” a term often used to describe the work of Truman Capote and Tom Wolfe, wherein the storytelling techniques of a novel are grafted on to real life. It’s not quite fiction and it’s not…

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