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To Kill a Mockingbird

1,000 Books To Read Before You Die: A Life-Changing List

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If you visit the BookTrib.com website primarily for book discovery, we’re here to tell you about a book that can only be described as the consummate book discovery source. What’s so much fun about 1,000 Books to Read Before You Die: A Life-Changing List (Workman Publishing) is you can start reading it on any of its almost 900 pages, and you don’t even have to finish it to thoroughly enjoy it. Want more BookTrib? Sign up NOW for news and giveaways! It took author and veteran bookseller James Mustich 14 years to compile and write 1,000 Books, which leads to an obvious question: why only 14 years? Understand up front this was not conceived as a book of the 1,000 Greatest Hits…

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“Booth” Sci-Fi Writer Pellegrini Wins Indie Author Poll

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Booth, (Amazon Digital Services) Jason Pellegrini’s latest page turner, is presented as the winner of Just The Right Book’s Indie Author Poll. Booth tells the story of a death row inmate as he reflects on his life on the day of his execution. The Long Island native who beat out 23 other independent authors to become the winner of JTRB’s previous indie author poll also discusses his decision to self-publish, and his admiration for Stephen King. Buy Jason’s book Booth! Other books in this episode: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King The Never Enders by Michael Sonbert Want more BookTrib? Sign up NOW for news and giveaways!

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How To Judge A Book By Its Cover: 18 Famous Books

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Have you ever stopped to think about how your favorite books’ covers were conceptualized? The Grapes of Wrath cover artist, Elmer Hader, made a living illustrating children’s books with his wife, and that’s how John Steinbeck discovered his work. The stories behind some of the most iconic book covers are truly fascinating, and this infographic from Invaluable highlights some of the most recognized throughout history. Check out how each designer brought their visions to life!   Want more BookTrib? Sign up NOW for news and giveaways!

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Now Trending: Could New J.D. Salinger Books Be on the Horizon?

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J.D. Salinger has been in the spotlight in recent weeks – something the famously reclusive author would probably have hated. But between the September biopic, Rebel in the Rye, and a recent New York Times article about possible new books from the author, he’s getting more attention than ever. It begs the question: how would Salinger feel about all of this renewed interest in his life and art? About a week ago, The New York Times ran an article titled, “So Where Are the New J.D. Salinger Books We Were Promised?” In it, they wonder at the presence of new work by the author, who, according to several sources, kept writing long after his final authorized publication in 1965. A…

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Biloxi Blues: School District in Mississippi Bans ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’

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This past weekend, the film Marshall opened in theaters starring Chadwick Boseman. Marshall chronicles one case in the early career of former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.  The case, prior to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education case Marshall presented before the high court and won, saw him defending a black man (played by Emmy winner and breakout star of ‘This Is Us’, Sterling K. Brown) falsely accused of raping a white woman in Connecticut in 1940. Watching this little-known case in Marshall’s career play out on film, one cannot help but to recall how similar cases of false rape accusations of black men by white women have been portrayed in film (Rosewood comes to mind) and in literature. While rape…

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J.D. Salinger and Other Reluctantly Famous: 5 Authors Who Stayed Out of the Public Eye

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From Stephen King to J.K. Rowling, there are plenty of recognizable authors who regularly interact with both the press and the public. But what about the ones who aren’t quite as willing to step into the limelight? More than a few authors have chosen to eschew the fame completely, sometimes even living in solitude instead of engaging with the world. The most well-known of these reclusive authors is easily J.D. Salinger, who also happens to be the topic of the recently released Rebel in the Rye. Salinger wrote 5 books over the course of his career, as well as dozens of short stories. He’s most famous for Catcher in the Rye, of course, his coming-of-age novel about angsty teen Holden…

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The Mockingbird’s Voice is Stilled: Harper Lee Dies at 89

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Book lovers sensed Harper Lee’s secret—she was a fellow reader. In a way, her life after the astonishing overnight success of To Kill a Mockingbird was a reader’s dream. She kept a quiet existence dividing her time between her small Southern town and tiny New York City apartment, which must have allowed plenty of time to devour books without needing to interrupt a good story with such nuisances as a day job. The author, whose fame arose from what has been called the most important book of the 20th century, has passed at the age of 89. In 2006 she shared her love of books with Oprah Winfrey and readers of her magazine, O. She recalled her earliest reading experience:…

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American Masters’ Filmmaker Discusses Harper Lee Documentary on PBS

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If you want to take part in the unprecedented literary celebration that is the release of Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman (Harper, July 14), the “parent” novel of her classic To Kill a Mockingbird, you don’t even have to leave your home—it’s coming to a television and computer near you. As part of the Watchman festivities, THIRTEEN, New York’s flagship public television station, is presenting “THIRTEEN Days of Harper Lee,” an on-air and online collection of programming celebrating the author and her work. One of THIRTEEN’s special programs will be an airing of an updated version of Harper Lee: Hey, Boo, a documentary by Emmy award-winning filmmaker Mary McDonagh Murphy. The airing will take place on THIRTEEN’s American Masters…

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Five authors whose fame rests on a single great novel

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“When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow.” And so begins Harper Lee’s seminal 1960 novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, where we’re introduced to young Jean Louise “Scout” Finch, her brother and protector, Jem, and their father, the wise attorney and champion for justice Atticus Finch. Equal parts coming-of-age tale, Southern Gothic, and social commentary, Mockingbird—this is the pre-Katniss Everdeen version featuring the bird—is one of the most beloved novels of the 20th century. In 2006, in a poll conducted in Britain, librarians ranked it as the book every adult should read (it came in ahead of the Bible). The themes—racial inequality, rape, loss of innocence—are as resonant today as they were…

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Ten most memorable lines from literature by female authors

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In this second installment of BookTrib’s continuing series that aims to bring you, dear reader, 50 of the most memorable lines in literature, you’ll have lots of fodder for those late-night trivia sessions at the bar. Or just some pithy responses to everyday questions. How do you work classic literature into your daily life? And, as always, we welcome your suggestions in the comments. Books and the literary lifestyle thrive when shared. As an added bonus, since 2014 is the Year of Reading Women, this week’s installment offers ten brilliant gems from women writers.   1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Advice as easily applicable as to writing as it is to how we live our lives, Atticus…

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Live Interview with Wiley Cash, Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author

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The critically acclaimed author of the New York Times bestseller A Land More Kind Than Home—hailed as “a powerfully moving debut that reads as if Cormac McCarthy decided to rewrite Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird” (Richmond Times Dispatch)—returns with a resonant novel of love and atonement, blood and vengeance, set in western North Carolina, involving two young sisters, a wayward father, and an enemy determined to see him pay for his sins.   WILEY CASH March 18, 2014 at 1:00 PM (ET) This Dark Road to Mercy After their mother’s unexpected death, twelve-year-old Easter and her six-year-old sister Ruby are adjusting to life in foster care when their errant father, Wade, suddenly appears. Since Wade signed away his legal…

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Need a date (or want to stay single)? Open a book.

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Literature is rife with romantic prospects, as well as those people your mother would tell you to avoid at all costs. When you’re sitting at home, staring at your bookshelf this Valentine’s Day, consider these fictional characters who would arguably make a better (or infinitely worse) date than that one you’re either preparing (or wishing) for. There’s someone here for everyone. Let’s start with the ones in the plus column.     Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy (Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice): Everyone’s (or at least most people’s) favorite eligible Austen man, Mr. Darcy is the one you want if you’re into hate-at-first-sight that eventually blossoms into love.         Count Dracula (Bram Stoker’s Dracula): A less obvious choice, but…

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