Tag archive

The Silence of the Lambs

Notes and Texts From Bram Stoker Inspire “Dracula” Prequel

in Fiction by

This story appears through BookTrib’s partnership with the International Thriller Writers. It first appeared in The Big Thrill.  While it may seem that the vampire novel has been drained of every conceivable drop of blood, the truth is, the Undead can rise and walk the earth, becoming more Undead than ever before—in the right authorial hands. Dracul (Putnam’s Sons), co-written by J. D. Barker and Dacre Stoker, infuses the classic story of fighting to defeat a terrifying vampire with a clutch of finely drawn characters and eerie, imaginative scenarios, drawing on little-known facts about the real Bram Stoker. The novel bears little resemblance to high school hangouts or fanged erotica. Using Stoker’s own epistolary device, Dracul sets out chilling mysteries and murders that…

Keep Reading

Diagnosing Literary Characters, One Murderer at a Time

in Fiction by

Murder is contextual. Meaning, the action of killing by itself tells us nothing about underlying motivation. A murder in war, for example, has an entirely different motive than a serial killer’s compulsive, methodical kills. It’s apples and oranges, really: both fruit on the outside, but very different on the inside. If we want to understand the mind of a murderer, real or fictional, we need to understand motivation. Truth is, murderers have motivations for their kills and they usually have a moral code, too. A skewed moral code, but it’s one which makes their kills make sense to them, nonetheless. And hey, when you’re driven to kill, who cares what everyone else thinks. Right? These three fictional villains certainly don’t.…

Keep Reading

Go to Top