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Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Here’s Why Edgar Allan Poe Still Matters

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Celebrating the death rather than the birthday of the master of the macabre, is only fitting. On this day October 7, 1849 Edgar Allan Poe died at the age of 40 after he was found in a gutter on a side street in Baltimore, Maryland. Some people say he died from an opium overdose, others say it was alcohol poisoning, some believe it was pneumonia, or murder? No one knows. The circumstances surrounding his death intensifies his mystique. It’s eerie and strangely perfect at the same time that a man famous for composing the scariest stories ever would die under a shadow of mystery and suspicion. I had the fortune of being introduced to Poe when, at 9 years old, I…

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These Emmy Award Nominees Exist Thanks to 6 Amazing Books!

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The 68th Emmy Awards are right around the corner! Television is pretty easy to love, but it’s even easier to love when it comes attached to a little reading material. Plus, you know that here at BookTrib, we are completely obligated to only root for shows that are based on books (sorry Mr. Robot). So, without further ado, here are our favorite shows up for an Emmy (and the books they’re based on)!   A Game of Thrones, George R.R. Martin (Bantam Reprint, 2011) This first one is no secret. In fact, the divergences between HBO’s hit show and Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire book series have caused alternating bouts of outrage and curiosity from fans of the…

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You’re Not Fooling Anyone: Book Bromances That Should Totally Just be Romances

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Ever read a book and wonder why the main characters who are best of friends aren’t just dating each other? Sometimes, if they’re lucky, they will fall in love by the end of the story. However, in many cases, friendship doesn’t always lead to love; which is why we simply call it a bromance. However, let’s step outside of the heterosexual box and take a look at a few literary friendships that, let’s face it, would totally work better as just plain romances. Here, Matt and Katie from the BookTrib staff pick their top three bromances they pretty much consider a relationship: Matt’s Top 3: Frodo and Sam: The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkein (Mariner Books, 2005) Frodo Baggins and Samwise Gamgee are…

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5 Audiobooks Perfect for Your Long Summer Drives

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audiobooks in the car

As you pull out of the driveway, everyone is excited. You’re heading out for one of those meticulously planned, ideally memorable vacations that you’ll talk about for years. You will return refreshed and energized, carrying smartphones and digital cameras chock full of memories. This vacation will go down in history as one of the greatest ever! But you have to get there first. Once you hit the highway, everyone in the car starts to realize that many hours must pass before the memories can begin. Well, good memories, at any rate. Who enjoys memories from an eight-hour car ride? Amidst all the planning, you’ve overlooked the critical travel element, which is all too common. Don’t despair, though; there’s a cure for the…

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6 ways to get your Sherlock fix while waiting for the new season

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It’s been a long time since the brainy bromance of Benedict Cumberbatch’s Sherlock Holmes and Martin Freeman’s John Watson graced our television screens. And, unfortunately, the world’s most famous detective and his long-suffering assistant/best friend/partner in crime(-solving) won’t be back until, at the very earliest, the end of 2015. Filming is underway for a Sherlock holiday special that’s rumored to air on the BBC this Christmas, but for us poor Americans (unless, like the similarly festive Doctor Who episodes, it’s simulcast around the world), we probably won’t see any new exploits until next year. There is, of course, always Elementary on CBS, another contemporary take on the Holmes and Watson duo. Beyond the obvious fact that the two leads are…

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The everlasting detective: When gumshoes return from the grave

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We take fictional deaths hard. From classic literature (we’re still coming to terms with Lennie’s death in Of Mice and Men and Jay Gatsby’s demise in Fitzgerald’s masterpiece) to modern bestsellers (we won’t spoil it for anyone, but X’s death in Mockingjay and Y’s death in Allegiant shook us up), readers mourn for figments of an author’s imagination. But sometimes dying isn’t the last page of the story. Some heroes are resurrected—to readers’ mixed reception. In several instances, it’s the choice of the author to bring a seemingly dead character back to life (Sherlock Holmes and “The Reichenbach Fall,” anyone?). Other times, the resurrection comes long after the original author’s death. Putting aside the larger issue of whether the dead…

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Holmes, our game is now afoot

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“Eliminate all other factors,” that most famous of detectives once said, “and the one that remains must be the truth.” Sherlock Holmes first appeared over 125 years ago and, a federal judge recently ruled, he’s here to stay. In fact, he could even stay at your house and you could write a story about it. The rights to the great logician, his loyal chronicler Dr. John Watson, and the villainous Moriarity are now in the public domain, meaning that the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Estate may no longer demand a licensing fee should you want to write a book about Holmes solving the disappearance of your puppy. According to U.S. copyright law, the fifty stories and novels Doyle published before…

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