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Sherlock Holmes

BookTrib Q&A: Father-Daughter Duo Charles Veley and Anna Elliot on Their New Sherlock Holmes Narrative Series

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Accomplished authors in their own right, father-daughter duo Charles Veley and Anna Elliott have been teaming up to bring a whole new take to the Sherlock Holmes stories. Shaking up the typical narrative is the introduction of Lucy James, a headstrong, independent American actress – who also turns out to be Holmes’ daughter. Together with the stabilizing presence of the ever-faithful Watson, they become partner sleuths, navigating their way through the worst crimes, facing down archenemies, and unraveling mysteries. BookTrib caught up with Charles Veley and Anna Elliot to talk about creating the daughter of Sherlock Holmes, the resurgence of Holmes in pop culture, and working together.   BookTrib: Lucy James is such a fantastic character, and she’s been so…

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Lyndsay Faye on Mystery Writing and the Love of Sherlock Holmes

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Lyndsay Faye

BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content, including this article by Lyndsay Faye, talking about her release, The Whole Art of Detection and the love of Sherlock Holmes. Mystery author Lyndsay Faye has made it her business to know what other people don’t know about Sherlock Holmes. Her latest, The Whole Art of Detection, imagines Holmes and Dr. John Watson in a variety of new and dangerous adventures. This makes her the perfect person to ask: Just what is it about this British detective that keeps readers fascinated? Why do we crave more stories about this intelligent crime solver? Here, Faye explores the many reasons why a Victorian detective remains relevant in our modern world. Sherlock Holmes.…

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Here’s Why Edgar Allan Poe Still Matters

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Celebrating the death rather than the birthday of the master of the macabre, is only fitting. On this day October 7, 1849 Edgar Allan Poe died at the age of 40 after he was found in a gutter on a side street in Baltimore, Maryland. Some people say he died from an opium overdose, others say it was alcohol poisoning, some believe it was pneumonia, or murder? No one knows. The circumstances surrounding his death intensifies his mystique. It’s eerie and strangely perfect at the same time that a man famous for composing the scariest stories ever would die under a shadow of mystery and suspicion. I had the fortune of being introduced to Poe when, at 9 years old, I…

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You’re Not Fooling Anyone: Book Bromances That Should Totally Just be Romances

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Ever read a book and wonder why the main characters who are best of friends aren’t just dating each other? Sometimes, if they’re lucky, they will fall in love by the end of the story. However, in many cases, friendship doesn’t always lead to love; which is why we simply call it a bromance. However, let’s step outside of the heterosexual box and take a look at a few literary friendships that, let’s face it, would totally work better as just plain romances. Here, Matt and Katie from the BookTrib staff pick their top three bromances they pretty much consider a relationship: Matt’s Top 3: Frodo and Sam: The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkein (Mariner Books, 2005) Frodo Baggins and Samwise Gamgee are…

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The game of love is afoot: time to don your “dear-stalker” hat

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Thank goodness we’ve managed to put another Valentine’s Day behind us. Yes, I know it’s supposed to be the holiday of love and flowers and chocolates and all things satin and lacy. But once you manage to shove your way through all the cherubim fluttering around your head in a perfumed haze, you start to realize that this holiday is really all about disappointment. And not just because those irresistible three-pound boxes of discount truffles hammer the final sticky-sweet nail into the coffin of your New Year’s resolutions or because you can’t find a greeting card with message that doesn’t make your molars ache. No, I mean deep romantic disappointment. Let’s face it, whether you’re single, dating, married, divorced, or…

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Holmes, our game is now afoot

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“Eliminate all other factors,” that most famous of detectives once said, “and the one that remains must be the truth.” Sherlock Holmes first appeared over 125 years ago and, a federal judge recently ruled, he’s here to stay. In fact, he could even stay at your house and you could write a story about it. The rights to the great logician, his loyal chronicler Dr. John Watson, and the villainous Moriarity are now in the public domain, meaning that the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Estate may no longer demand a licensing fee should you want to write a book about Holmes solving the disappearance of your puppy. According to U.S. copyright law, the fifty stories and novels Doyle published before…

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