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Shel Silverstein

All the Feels: The First Book That Made You Cry

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Whether or not you’re an easy crier, there’s usually one book that manages to hit you straight in the feels. For some of us at Early Bird Books, The Fault in Our Stars was the first to bring on serious waterworks (we’ll never read John Green on the subway again). For others, it was Bridge to Terabithia or Philip Pullman’s The Amber Spyglass. As for our awesome readers, The Red Fern Grows seems to have broken the majority of your little-kid hearts. In fact, other than tragic relationship stories like The Notebook, most of your first-time tearjerkers featured animals of some sort—Charlotte the spider and Old Yeller the dog, for example. And while you probably can’t say you enjoyed mourning…

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Top 5 children’s books for Earth Day

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This Earth Day, consider the power that the spare prose and arresting illustrations of children’s literature have in delivering a message.  Children’s books have the ability to teach us a thing or two about the delicate dance that happens between us and our planet. Here are five of the most visually stunning children’s books to celebrate Earth Day: The Lorax by Dr. Seuss The Lorax combines intense visuals (think bright pink and yellow truffula trees) and lessons that rhyme—a classic tale about saving Mother Earth. I’ll Follow the Moon written by Stephanie Lisa Tara, illustrated by Lee Edward Fodi Awash in images of sea turtles amidst calm and serene blue waters, this story highlights the strong bond between a mother…

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Edamame Salami, or Eat Your Poetry; It’s Good for You!

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“Oh, Mom, we do enough of that in school.” My daughter’s reaction to the news that I’d be leading a poetry jam with her Girl Scout troop was pretty much what you’d expect from a hipster 10-year-old. But our troop leader had loved the idea, so it was a done deal, school poetry lessons or not. When the day arrived, of course we started with a snack. The troop had come straight from school on that May afternoon, and being fifth graders, they were as famished as if they’d just come from a 10-mile trek. Because poetry was the theme of the day, we’d have a “poetic” snack. First on the menu was Edamame Salami, which I had invented for…

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