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Book Excerpt! Jessica Teich’s ‘The Future Tense of Joy’

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For a sneak peek of Jessica Teich’s memoir, The Future Tense of Joy, check out the excerpt below. INTRODUCTION Survivors remember the past in pieces. Not necessarily “before” and “after,” which would be easier. It’s more like time melts into Dali-like puddles, or convulses, slamming together faces and events. Psychologists often speak of a distortion in time afterward, as though the trauma occurred only moments before, but some- times the pain is so buried it ceases to exist. Then it springs up suddenly, like an allergy, even when it seems there’s no irritant. Or descends, like a fine but malevolent mesh. That was true for me, but I could never write about my experience as a “survivor.” Even the word seemed…

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The Books on Bridget Jones’s Imaginary Bookshelf

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It’s hard to fully encapsulate the amazingness that is Bridget Jones’s Diary. Helen Fielding’s book is fantastic, and the movie is even better. (Seriously, come at me). Between the most relatable female heroine ever, the objectively least-crazy-most-sensible-while-still-being-attractive leading man, and quite possibly the greatest, least graceful fight scene in movie history, 2001’s Bridget Jones’s Diary is my favorite romantic comedy film. It will never be beaten. It will never be surpassed. It is flawless. The sequel was bitterly disappointing. Let’s not talk about it. However, whether we like it or not, Bridget Jones is having a baby. Preliminary reviews for the new film are fairly positive, which I’m taking as a good sign. It’s being directed by the original film’s…

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Book Excerpt! Allison Gilbert’s ‘Passed and Present’

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Today, April 12, marks the much-anticipated release day for Allison Gilbert’s Passed and Present: Keeping Memories of Loved Ones Alive (Seal Press, April 12). A how-to manual for learning ways to best remember the ones we’ve lost in life, Passed and Present offers a road map meant to help the reader celebrate lost life rather than mourn it. Below is an excerpt from the newly released book. When someone we love dies, we usually benefit from being passive recipients of support. Between the rituals of burial and the recitation of certain prayers, between the wakes and shiva calls, the bereaved, and those who console them, know their role and take their place. But consider the vacuum that happens later. I’ve never met…

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Emily V. Gordon Wants You to Find Your Personal Bat Signal and Superpowers

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Look—up in the sky! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s—the last person in the world you would have suspected of being a super hero. Just who is this amazing being? Who lies behind this hero’s mysterious secret identity? You can answer that question by looking in the mirror, says Emily V. Gordon, author of Super You: Release Your Inner Super Hero (Seal Press; September 29, 2015). In the book, Gordon, a writer, producer, and former couples and family therapist (but no relation to Commissioner James Gordon), shows readers how to reach their full heroic potential. And no, that doesn’t mean that we’ll be foiling bank robberies or fighting off hordes of invading aliens. It means that readers will learn…

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